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Thread: Fiba Asia Cup 2021 Qualifiers

  1. #3481
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    Quote Originally Posted by barok espinoza View Post
    @ Jamskie

    but the community quarantine will last for a month. the pba will be violating the order if it resumes practice in 2 weeks. what about players from outside the NCR, will they be given a free pass because of this pba declaration? so many things to consider here.

    by the way, this quarantine is only a privilege which the poor do not enjoy, hence, it is not that effective. be that as it may, those who can afford to isolate themselves should not take it lightly as these pocket quarantines buy the scientists and doctors time to make a proper medical response.

    right now, we only have a few thousand kits which are reserved for those patients fighting for their life. the overall strategy is if you're just a patient under investigation and your symptoms are just mild, the DOH will not waste their resources on you but you will be isolated. so testing all the players is a waste of meager resources.
    Ok noted.

    Hope this covid-19 scare simmers down soon.

    Talking about the drastic precautionary measures that everybody has been doing, in the province where I live, the international flights to & from Incheon, South Korea have not been cancelled. This to think that the flights to & from manila have already been cancelled about a week ago. There are only more than a hundred Covid-19 positives in Manila while in South Korea there are already more than 8 thousand covid-19 positives. This goes to show how extremely stupid some of our authorities are.

    Sorry for the OT.
    Last edited by JAMSKIE; 03-16-2020 at 03:39 AM.
    "A king may move a man, a father may claim a son, but that man can also move himself, and only then does that man truly begin his own game. Remember that howsoever you are played or by whom, your soul is in your keeping alone, even though those who presume to play you be kings or men of power, when you stand before God, you cannot say, 'But I was told by others to do thus,' or that virtue was not convenient at the time. This will not suffice." - King Baldwin IV

  2. #3482
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    as previously stated in the other thread, national team practices are nowhere near important at this point.. health safety and protection is the priority..

  3. #3483

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAMSKIE View Post
    Ok noted.

    Hope this covid-19 scare simmers down soon.

    Talking about the drastic precautionary measures that everybody has been doing, in the province where I live, the international flights to & from Incheon, South Korea have not been cancelled. This to think that the flights to & from manila have already been cancelled about a week ago. There are only more than a hundred Covid-19 positives in Manila while in South Korea there are already more than 8 thousand covid-19 positives. This goes to show how extremely stupid some of our authorities are.

    Sorry for the OT.
    what they're not telling us is that it is theoretically possible the philippines has even a higher number of covid cases than SK. the SK government tested 200k citizens for covid-19 and only less than 5 percent of this figure recorded positive (8k+). meanwhile, in ph, we have only tested a few individuals and the ratio is not that encouraging (less than a thousand tests conducted). that's why we really need to acquire those test kits badly so we can have a better approximation of the state of the pandemic in the country. we need a medical response to this problem, not military posturing. remember that the 8k cases in SK have been isolated thus preventing these people from infecting others whereas in the ph, the infected are moving and infecting more people.

    back on topic, if this global crisis does not dissipate soon, we might revert to the old FIBA Asia format where the entire event is played in 1 tournament, if that is even possible. i have no qualms about that as long as it is just for the 2021 iteration.
    Last edited by barok espinoza; 03-16-2020 at 05:07 AM.

  4. #3484
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    Quote Originally Posted by barok espinoza View Post
    what they're not telling us is that it is theoretically possible the philippines has even a higher number of covid cases than SK. the SK government tested 200k citizens for covid-19 and only less than 5 percent of this figure recorded positive (8k+). meanwhile, in ph, we have only tested a few individuals and the ratio is not that encouraging (less than a thousand tests conducted). that's why we really need to acquire those test kits badly so we can have a better approximation of the state of the pandemic in the country. we need a medical response to this problem, not military posturing. remember that the 8k cases in SK have been isolated thus preventing these people from infecting others whereas in the ph, the infected are moving and infecting more people.

    back on topic, if this global crisis does not dissipate soon, we might revert to the old FIBA Asia format where the entire event is played in 1 tournament, if that is even possible. i have no qualms about that as long as it is just for the 2021 iteration.
    How I would like that to happen. Honestly, this "home-and-away" format by FIBA sucks.
    "A king may move a man, a father may claim a son, but that man can also move himself, and only then does that man truly begin his own game. Remember that howsoever you are played or by whom, your soul is in your keeping alone, even though those who presume to play you be kings or men of power, when you stand before God, you cannot say, 'But I was told by others to do thus,' or that virtue was not convenient at the time. This will not suffice." - King Baldwin IV

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    Senior Member TurboCharger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAMSKIE View Post
    How I would like that to happen. Honestly, this "home-and-away" format by FIBA sucks.
    I actually believe that it makes basketball more relevant on a global scale. It reaches the fans. Give it a few more cycle, it will catch up.

  6. #3486
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    top philippine team my 1st ever blog

    Sir Mico Halili
    Mark Caguioa
    Asi Taulava
    The Dean
    Jawo
    Jun Mar Fajardo
    Jay Jay Helterbrand
    2002 Ateneo Blue Eagles
    2007 philippine team
    Ren Ren Ritualo
    Kuya Marcus
    Kuya Dre
    Beau Belga

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    Rest in Peace Boris Stankovic..The father of open basketball

    https://www.spin.ph/basketball/fiba/...ef=home_feed_2

    During that period, Stankovic initiated a move that changed the landscape of world basketball forever.

    In 1989 he changed the FIBA rule that allowed NBA players to compete in the Summer Olympics, and later, in the FIBA World Cup, paving the way for the collection of NBA stars later known as the Dream Team to take the 1992 Barcelona Games by storm.

    The Philippines was among the first to benefit from the rule change as PBA players were finally allowed to play internationally, and in 1990 behind an all-pro team coached by Robert Jaworski, finished runner-up behind China in the Beijing Asian Games.

  8. #3488
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Lee View Post
    top philippine team my 1st ever blog

    Sir Mico Halili
    Mark Caguioa
    Asi Taulava
    The Dean
    Jawo
    Jun Mar Fajardo
    Jay Jay Helterbrand
    2002 Ateneo Blue Eagles
    2007 philippine team
    Ren Ren Ritualo
    Kuya Marcus
    Kuya Dre
    Beau Belga
    Mico Halili is the best national team player better than Alapag

  9. #3489

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    Quote Originally Posted by hmbopbaduwap View Post
    Rest in Peace Boris Stankovic..The father of open basketball

    https://www.spin.ph/basketball/fiba/...ef=home_feed_2

    During that period, Stankovic initiated a move that changed the landscape of world basketball forever.

    In 1989 he changed the FIBA rule that allowed NBA players to compete in the Summer Olympics, and later, in the FIBA World Cup, paving the way for the collection of NBA stars later known as the Dream Team to take the 1992 Barcelona Games by storm.

    The Philippines was among the first to benefit from the rule change as PBA players were finally allowed to play internationally, and in 1990 behind an all-pro team coached by Robert Jaworski, finished runner-up behind China in the Beijing Asian Games.
    ... and before him was the only Asian at the top of FIBA, our very own Gonzalo Puyat II, his long time mentor. Just setting it so people won’t be too much at awe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAMSKIE View Post
    How I would like that to happen. Honestly, this "home-and-away" format by FIBA sucks.
    Agree. the one tournament is much better for me. So there will be no big seperation between games. And to have a crowned champion in fiba asia.

  11. #3491
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurboCharger View Post
    I actually believe that it makes basketball more relevant on a global scale. It reaches the fans. Give it a few more cycle, it will catch up.
    Yeah.. and if they back in the old format then we will not see teams like Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Guam, Palestine, etc... to compete, If the old format still exist, teams like Malaysia, Hong Kong will still qualified due to zone qualification format, but honestly eh they have no business to compete in this tournament.. The former are more better than the latter, they are only unlucky because their zones are more tough and only limited slots given to their zones.. take example Guam, how they can qualify if their zone includes Australia and New Zealand? that two teams are world class and they can't pass these two.. But Guam is much better than Hong Kong, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia and Sri Lanka.. or even Taiwan at this point.. So this new format is much better because the competition is much higher and more competitive.. Only strong and deserving teams will only qualified and not minnow teams..

  12. #3492
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    Quote Originally Posted by mathematicianrcg View Post
    Agree. the one tournament is much better for me. So there will be no big seperation between games. And to have a crowned champion in fiba asia.
    No.. would you like to see teams like Hong Kong, Malaysia always qualified because the old format only use zonal qualifications? Guam is more better than them, even Saudi and Palestine, but because their zones are much tougher eh they can't get through main qualifiers and only limited slots only given to them.. This is best format because it will give the competition more tougher and we will see new teams that we don't know eh they are better than we expected..

  13. #3493
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAMSKIE View Post
    With the games of the PBA, PBA D-league suspended indefinitely & it looks like the games would not resume any sooner with Covid-19 threat not expected to go away any sooner (unfortunately), what if we take this opportunity to give our National team some practices/scrimmages? I understand, PBA teams are barred from conducting practices/scrimmages in the next 2 weeks as part of precaution against the Covid-19 threat, but I think after that 2-week period, PBA teams would resume their routine practices & scrimmages. So what if our National team also conducts a twice-a-week practice sessions?

    I think it would not hurt the PBA teams if their National players join the National team practices/scrimmages twice a week while the PBA games are still suspended. The thing is, we don't know when will this Covid-19 scare would cease, so for the meantime while PBA games are suspended, our National team can conduct even a twice a week practices. For instance if the PBA will be able to resume its games in August, and we give the National team a twice-a-week practices, then our National team will have at least 32 practice sessions by August. Imagine the 32 practice sessions our National team could get while everything is not yet back to normal.

    I think we just need to be creative & take advantage of any opportunity that present circumstances present. Nobody wants this Covid-19 scare to happen as it has really brought drastic negative effects on our everyday lives, but we have no choice but to make drastic precautionary measures. But if said precautionary measures open up some opportunities, then we should be creative & alert enough to take advantage of it/them.
    Men!!! How they can practice if we are all under social distancing!! Do you want to see players will defend 6 ft. away to each other? As of now eh we will only wait that the virus will be gone or we will have already vaccine to this virus.. Even light workouts are prohibited because we can't touch some things that still covered by the virus..

  14. #3494
    Senior Member Jay P. Mercado's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam (a.k.a.) Tuwid View Post
    ... and before him was the only Asian at the top of FIBA, our very own Gonzalo Puyat II, his long time mentor. Just setting it so people won’t be too much at awe.
    Unfortunately, Sam, the position of FIBA President in the hierarchy is merely a ceremonial one. A position bestowed to an individual but actually has no power or influence.

    Puyat was elected President in 1976, just about the same time when the PHL was given the hosting chores for the 1978 FIBA World Championship (World Cup now). He stayed on for two terms, relinquishing it by 1984, making "the Spar" even more irrelevant in the domestic and international basketball scene.

    The real power emanates from the Secretary-General position, starting with William Jones of the UK(whose name is used to name the Taiwan tournament every July), Stankovic of Serbia, the late Patrick Baumann of Switzerland, and now Greece's Andreas Zagklis. The FIBA gods used to "sneer" at Puyat because he was both the FIBA and BAP President but doesn't even have control over the state of basketball affairs of his own country. By 1981, Puyat was rendered inutile when Danding Cojuangco became project director for basketball, and was in total command. The MICAA, the one tournament where Puyat had a stake (his family which owns Manilabank was a long-time member of the league) and secured the amateur players in the late 70's to represent the country, disbanded in 1982 and Cojuangco's Philippine Amateur Basketball League (PABL) was created. Puyat only came back to relevance after the EDSA Revolution when ECJ fleed the country, but only made matters worse, the most significant is giving Graham Lim an important position in the basketball echelon.

    And when open basketball was instituted in 1989 by Stankovic, Puyat pleaded with then PBA Kume Rudy Salud to field an all-pro team to the 1990 Asian Games in Beijing. Had Salud refused, Puyat would have sent the same team that he brought to KL in the SEA Games - the same team that lost the gold medal to the hosts. While he may have facilitated the move to have the PBA reinforce our national team, I'd personally give the credit to Salud and the PBA Board back then (including the Big J who was extremely vocal about participation) as the greater reason why it happened.

    Yes, I'm biased against Puyat. He set back PHL basketball by more than 30 years. We were already the kingpins of Asia and while there was no stopping China from becoming a dominant figure, it was Puyat that triggered nine team owners to put up the PBA to steer clear of Puyat's control.

  15. #3495

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay P. Mercado View Post
    Unfortunately, Sam, the position of FIBA President in the hierarchy is merely a ceremonial one. A position bestowed to an individual but actually has no power or influence.

    Puyat was elected President in 1976, just about the same time when the PHL was given the hosting chores for the 1978 FIBA World Championship (World Cup now). He stayed on for two terms, relinquishing it by 1984, making "the Spar" even more irrelevant in the domestic and international basketball scene.

    The real power emanates from the Secretary-General position, starting with William Jones of the UK(whose name is used to name the Taiwan tournament every July), Stankovic of Serbia, the late Patrick Baumann of Switzerland, and now Greece's Andreas Zagklis. The FIBA gods used to "sneer" at Puyat because he was both the FIBA and BAP President but doesn't even have control over the state of basketball affairs of his own country. By 1981, Puyat was rendered inutile when Danding Cojuangco became project director for basketball, and was in total command. The MICAA, the one tournament where Puyat had a stake (his family which owns Manilabank was a long-time member of the league) and secured the amateur players in the late 70's to represent the country, disbanded in 1982 and Cojuangco's Philippine Amateur Basketball League (PABL) was created. Puyat only came back to relevance after the EDSA Revolution when ECJ fleed the country, but only made matters worse, the most significant is giving Graham Lim an important position in the basketball echelon.

    And when open basketball was instituted in 1989 by Stankovic, Puyat pleaded with then PBA Kume Rudy Salud to field an all-pro team to the 1990 Asian Games in Beijing. Had Salud refused, Puyat would have sent the same team that he brought to KL in the SEA Games - the same team that lost the gold medal to the hosts. While he may have facilitated the move to have the PBA reinforce our national team, I'd personally give the credit to Salud and the PBA Board back then (including the Big J who was extremely vocal about participation) as the greater reason why it happened.

    Yes, I'm biased against Puyat. He set back PHL basketball by more than 30 years. We were already the kingpins of Asia and while there was no stopping China from becoming a dominant figure, it was Puyat that triggered nine team owners to put up the PBA to steer clear of Puyat's control.
    Perspectives truly depend on where you sit Jay. Back then, before the birth of the PBA, Lito Puyat was the main man.. the Philippine basketball Moses, the overall good guy... you can ask elders about that if you were too young then.... then came Salud and the PBA, unseating the old league, MICAA, having all the best players of the land except the Crispa superstars, suddenly they managed to reduce the old BAP into a paper and “toothless” basketball organization. Then PBA uprising came to a total success after the Danny Floro owned Redmanizers finally joined the fold a few conferences later.

    https://www.manilatimes.net/2020/03/...-puyat/704633/

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    ^^^ hope thoughtful people read the Manila Times link above and recharge their Pinoy hoops history.

  17. #3497
    Senior Member Jay P. Mercado's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam (a.k.a.) Tuwid View Post
    Perspectives truly depend on where you sit Jay. Back then, before the birth of the PBA, Lito Puyat was the main man.. the Philippine basketball Moses, the overall good guy... you can ask elders about that if you were too young then.... then came Salud and the PBA, unseating the old league, MICAA, having all the best players of the land except the Crispa superstars, suddenly they managed to reduce the old BAP into a paper and “toothless” basketball organization. Then PBA uprising came to a total success after the Danny Floro owned Redmanizers finally joined the fold a few conferences later.

    https://www.manilatimes.net/2020/03/...-puyat/704633/
    True, we look at things from different viewpoints. Eddie Alinea may have meant well and may be describing Puyat correctly, but from my perspective, it was also under his watch when the PHL's esteemed and lofty position in basketball collapsed. There are two ways to view this: one, it's the PBA's fault for putting up a pro league, preventing the top players to suit up for the national team. Two, Puyat didn't have a national development program for the sport, which led to the BAP's mendicant ways of getting players from the commercial MICAA teams. The teams were the ones paying for the salaries of the players - even if they were supposedly amateurs.

    I chose to look at things from the second. Had Puyat been creative enough to churn in one talent after another that will equally benefit the MICAA teams, there would've been no need for the owners to put up a pro league. By then, it was the commercial teams that were scouting for top talents in the collegiate level - Crispa was practically monopolizing the UE varsity players, YCO had a hold on the San Beda Red Lions cagers, Solid Mills had a lock on the FEU guys, while SMC's pipeline came from the Cebu league. It wasn't like Puyat was responsible for bringing these guys to fore.

    Even when ECJ left, the easiest way to do things was to retain the NCC program. He didn't, and discarded everything almost immediately, forcing Still, Moore and Engelland to leave and the team disbanding. And of course, he made Graham Lim relevant, which, for me, was one of his biggest faults.

  18. #3498

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay P. Mercado View Post
    True, we look at things from different viewpoints. Eddie Alinea may have meant well and may be describing Puyat correctly, but from my perspective, it was also under his watch when the PHL's esteemed and lofty position in basketball collapsed. There are two ways to view this: one, it's the PBA's fault for putting up a pro league, preventing the top players to suit up for the national team. Two, Puyat didn't have a national development program for the sport, which led to the BAP's mendicant ways of getting players from the commercial MICAA teams. The teams were the ones paying for the salaries of the players - even if they were supposedly amateurs.

    I chose to look at things from the second. Had Puyat been creative enough to churn in one talent after another that will equally benefit the MICAA teams, there would've been no need for the owners to put up a pro league. By then, it was the commercial teams that were scouting for top talents in the collegiate level - Crispa was practically monopolizing the UE varsity players, YCO had a hold on the San Beda Red Lions cagers, Solid Mills had a lock on the FEU guys, while SMC's pipeline came from the Cebu league. It wasn't like Puyat was responsible for bringing these guys to fore.

    Even when ECJ left, the easiest way to do things was to retain the NCC program. He didn't, and discarded everything almost immediately, forcing Still, Moore and Engelland to leave and the team disbanding. And of course, he made Graham Lim relevant, which, for me, was one of his biggest faults.

    These two scenarios can easily be tagged

    Scenario 1 as reality and Scenario 2 as abstract.

    scenario 1 is reality— this actually happened and was the narrative of those times.. the equilibrium of the time’s existing basketball organization then was disrupted via a coup d’etat of sorts by which a majority number of participating commercial teams bolted out of the Manila Industrial and Commercial Athletic Association (MICAA) to form a new league, the PBA. With this development for the premier basketball league of the land marked a classification shift from amateur to professional status in basketball, which rendered players of the new league, the PBA, an outright disqualification from participating in any FIBA sanctioned and or any amateur basketball competition.
    Common sense gives reason enough to suggest that without turning professional via this coup, Philippine basketball would not have suffered through continuous participations at very minimal strength in any of its FIBA dates that thereby eventually signaled its systemic decline in status.

    scenario 2 is abstract, cause easily during that time no basketball nation had a basketball program that had the features of the NCC of Danding Cojuangco, it was “revolutionary” at the time, and was well still over 5-10 years before existence.
    One certainly could not fault Lito Puyat for not having thought of such a novel basketball program for simply, without being dealt a bad hand with the PBA coup, there was no need to think tank for such a program... such a unicorn program, even the NBA, the only professional league at that time didn’t have one to offset their inability to tap resources from their professional league.

    Lito Puyat’s name speaks only of achievements for Philippine basketball, IMO, but there is always a Waterloo to contrast Austerlitz, and for Lito Puyat, it is when he, with the capacity as the head of BAP, failed to sustain the gains of the NCC program in place of Danding Cojuangco, who after EDSA was no longer capable to do so, had he been blessed with the wisdom to shoulder such endeavor during that time frame, would have been the great inward to holding our lofty spot in FIBA Asia.
    Last edited by Sam (a.k.a.) Tuwid; 03-22-2020 at 05:44 PM.

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    Kudos to Sir Jay and Sir Sam for this very informative piece of information about why Philippine basketball is still in the doldrums nowadays because of what transpired during those early days..it's very unfortunate though that Philippine basketball as a whole was still influence/run by people who is very much fascinated with the 60's,70's, 80's and 90's vibes, that is why our technology, approach and philosophy are still 30 years(?) behind compared to those Europeans, Americans, Australians, NZ among others with Japan now quickly adapting this culture, thanks to coach Llamas for bringing this stuff to the Land of the Rising Sun. Even the NBA(today) as whole is now shifting/adapting to this new mantra, thanks to GSW of coach Steve Kerr, the early 2000 edition of the Phoenix Suns of coach Mike D' Antoni and Dallas Mavericks of the Nash\Nowitzki era among others who introduce a different kind of basketball during those times.

    As you may see majority of the coaches and trainees from HS up to collegiate levels are still very much influenced by these old-school approach, some foreign coaches also noticed this everytime they watched any of the games, their impression is that it's like watching the 70's, 80's and 90's NBA games and they somehow find it very amusing because somewhere in their past, they also implement the same philosophy during the early part of their coaching career. Now with coach Tab of Ateneo and coach Dickel of San Beda(?) running the show, we could expect some sort of a Dynasty for those two teams(nangyayari na nga sa Ateneo eh) and a regular fixture in the Championship series for UAAP and NCAA respectively, unless those jurassic minded coaches tried to implement new basketball technologies then I would say that Philippine basketball is now moving towards a new culture.

  20. #3500
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam (a.k.a.) Tuwid View Post
    These two scenarios can easily be tagged

    Scenario 1 as reality and Scenario 2 as abstract.

    scenario 1 is reality— this actually happened and was the narrative of those times.. the equilibrium of the time’s existing basketball organization then was disrupted via a coup d’etat of sorts by which a majority number of participating commercial teams bolted out of the Manila Industrial and Commercial Athletic Association (MICAA) to form a new league, the PBA. With this development for the premier basketball league of the land marked a classification shift from amateur to professional status in basketball, which rendered players of the new league, the PBA, an outright disqualification from participating in any FIBA sanctioned and or any amateur basketball competition.
    Common sense gives reason enough to suggest that without turning professional via this coup, Philippine basketball would not have suffered through continuous participations at very minimal strength in any of its FIBA dates that thereby eventually signaled its systemic decline in status.

    scenario 2 is abstract, cause easily during that time no basketball nation had a basketball program that had the features of the NCC of Danding Cojuangco, it was “revolutionary” at the time, and was well still over 5-10 years before existence.
    One certainly could not fault Lito Puyat for not having thought of such a novel basketball program for simply, without being dealt a bad hand with the PBA coup, there was no need to think tank for such a program... such a unicorn program, even the NBA, the only professional league at that time didn’t have one to offset their inability to tap resources from their professional league.

    Lito Puyat’s name speaks only of achievements for Philippine basketball, IMO, but there is always a Waterloo to contrast Austerlitz, and for Lito Puyat, it is when he, with the capacity as the head of BAP, failed to sustain the gains of the NCC program in place of Danding Cojuangco, who after EDSA was no longer capable to do so, had he been blessed with the wisdom to shoulder such endeavor during that time frame, would have been the great inward to holding our lofty spot in FIBA Asia.
    Perhaps, and I won't say you're wrong. But the circumstances back then would've allowed for a so-called "revolutionary" program to be put in effect, especially since the MICAA team owners already were incessantly complaining of the BAP's continued raiding of the players in their teams during the middle of the tournament. It wasn't like the owners unilaterally left the MICAA without notice - they've been voicing their plight to Puyat and company since the late 60's but nothing came out.

    And this can be substantiated by Puyat's own inactions after EDSA. It came to a point when even the PBL went up against the BAP and Puyat was forced to coalesce with the MBA founders in the late 90's (Jalasco was President but Puyat was still running the show). No program, no direction. Puyat was merely there to warm the seat and get the accolades for victories (that hardly came) and make the PBA the scapegoat for every debacle.

    When Martial Law came about in 1972, Puyat was retained as head of PHL basketball - a position he has been occupying since 1968. Prior to him, it was the late, Honorable Senator Ambrosio Padilla, who was BAP President and it was under him when the real success of the country's basketball program was achieved. Padilla's last major accomplishment was in 1967 when the PHL beat South Korea in the FIBA-Asia (then ABC) at the latter's homeground. Note that the PHL lost the ABC title only once in 1965 when we lost to Japan, 71-65.

    When Puyat came in, we lost the FIBA-Asia in 1969 and 1971 against SK and Japan, respectively. Fortunately, we were able to regain the title when we hosted the 1973 staging, but that was it. The decline of PHL basketball started not when the PBA opened but when Puyat assumed the position of BAP President.

    Going back to Martial Law, Puyat had all the power and authority in the world to scout and develop players in the countryside and make them available for both the national team and the commercial teams. The team owners would not have to spend to look for players in the provinces had the BAP not slept on the job. The BAP will scout for players, the commercial teams will benefit by getting these players, but under condition they'll be made available for the national team. But the reality was - the commercial teams were the ones looking for the players. SMB was the reason why we have topnotch talents like Ramon Fernandez, Estoy Estrada, Yoyong Martirez, Manny Paner, Dodie Miego, and later on, Biboy Ravanes, Arnie Tuadles and Marlowe Jacutin. Compare that with the BAP under Padilla and the foremost Cebuano player, Jake Rojas, who played for University of Visayas after being discovered by BAP officials through their Cebu ties - and went on to suit up for Yutivo and later, Ysmael Steel and Mariwasa, before signing up by Toyota to a PBA contract.

    Most sporting events back then were government-supported, if not, government-initiated. The Palarong Pambansa was the primary source of major talents from the provinces and Puyat could've easily secured the talents from all over the country. He had the funding from the government to run a solid grassroots recruitment program but never did. In the absence of such, how would you expect the team owners to respond?

    That's the reason why for more than 2 decades now, I've been harping for the NCC program. And it's the one program that will be mutually beneficial for team owners and the national sports association. The PBA's best years in terms of popularity happened when the NCC products joined the league. Those who also benefited from the program indirectly, the likes of Alvin, Benjie, Jolas, Glenn, Ato, etc., came in a year or two after and the PBA hit an all-time high. When the Gilas 1.0 players joined the PBA in 2011, the PBA also found renewed success after doldrum periods in the previous seasons. Everybody happy!

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