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Thread: NBA Scouts at FIBA Asian Championships

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    Senior Member thugpinoy's Avatar
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    Default NBA Scouts at FIBA Asian Championships

    Through the years NBA is going global, now, with some NBA teams now using the Asian Talents its possible that they will look into this tournament to scout for some new asian prospects who is capable playing for NBA. Talents like El Khatib, Madanly, Alapag, etc. should show their talents while these scouts are looking after them.
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    Last edited by thugpinoy; 03-11-2011 at 12:23 AM.

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    Senior Member daniab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thugpinoy
    Through the years NBA is going global, now, with some NBA teams now using the Asian Talents its possible that they will look into this tournament to scout for some new asian prospects who is capable playing for NBA. Talents like El Khatib, Madanly, Alapag, etc. should show their talents while these scouts are looking after them.
    No man i doubt those players even Fadi el khatib still have the chance to play in the NBA but i think this player(Anton ponomarev) can be scouted by the NBA's manager.
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    What these scouts are looking for are young, talented players with a lot of promise and among Asian cagers. I think Daniab is right, only Anton 'Borat' Ponomarev from Kazakhstan will meet these criteria. . .

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    Norwood's arrival in Asia should have a reason.. he could be a scout's material when he do good in the FIBA Asia. he is decently noticed in USA, since his George Mason University reached the NCAA final 4, but he was only a 6th man there, here in Asia, he could be more.

    *may his papers be ready soon enough
    It's ironic to see limited efforts from players with maximum salary.
    I wish they would apply "sabermetrics" in those financially challenged PBA teams to acquire players who are value for their money.

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    Senior Member viperbravo's Avatar
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    How about Jimmy Alapag, he is small but with a big heart! If Magsi Booges (pls. correct my spealing) and Earl Boykins make it to the NBA, why not Jimmy Alapag.

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    alapag is already in his 30's
    thats why

    but, sarunas jasikevicius of lithuania was 29 i think when he was invited in the nba

    but again, sarunas was playing back then in a high-level of competition in europe and in the olympics

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    Quote Originally Posted by viperbravo
    How about Jimmy Alapag, he is small but with a big heart! If Magsi Booges (pls. correct my spealing) and Earl Boykins make it to the NBA, why not Jimmy Alapag.
    given on what we've seen as basis, it looks like Jimmy is better than Boykins... but on the other hand, given the level of tournament they are playing, Boykins has the upperhand... that's why making to the Olympics will not only make history but it will also tests our players speed and skills against better and bigger opponents... who knows, Jimmy might schooled all the other PG in the Olympics...hehehe
    so even if we can't win a game, scouts will have good impression on him!
    Impossible is Nothing!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by psychopath
    alapag is already in his 30's
    thats why

    but, sarunas jasikevicius of lithuania was 29 i think when he was invited in the nba

    but again, sarunas was playing back then in a high-level of competition in europe and in the olympics
    Alapag is only 28 i think...
    Impossible is Nothing!!!

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    Fil-Am NBA scout, which is also now a Japan Super League Head Coach, Hernando Planells, will be there

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    Quote Originally Posted by FilWelsh
    What these scouts are looking for are young, talented players with a lot of promise and among Asian cagers. I think Daniab is right, only Anton 'Borat' Ponomarev from Kazakhstan will meet these criteria. . .
    Another prospect would be the very shifty 6-9 Forward Yi Li from China. Can shoot the three, handle the ball real well, can drive to the basket...and gets more fouls. hehehe
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    Quote Originally Posted by apiSigbinz
    Alapag is only 28 i think...
    he's born 1977
    and i think helterbrand is also in his 30's

    not a lot of years left for these great RP pointguards

    next to alapag and helterbrand, i cant think of anbody else ready to receive the torch from these two

    not cortez haha
    not now for him

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    Quote Originally Posted by psychopath
    he's born 1977
    and i think helterbrand is also in his 30's

    not a lot of years left for these great RP pointguards

    next to alapag and helterbrand, i cant think of anbody else ready to receive the torch from these two

    not cortez haha
    not now for him
    if that's the case then i think there's no chance that Jimmy can play in the NBA... hehehe maybe Norwood is ready to accept the torch... but isn't it too early to pass on to him... Alapag still have few years left on him...
    Impossible is Nothing!!!

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    young talented players are given a chance to go to the NBA. admit it, china has the factor. but, some players of quatar or jordan have chances. for the phil. players, i think it's just a dream to play although we have chances.
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    not all global nba players are young when they first played in the nba. arvydas sabonis and bateer menk played even they are quite old for a rookie. our not so old talented asian players have a chance. who knows maybe one of your favorite asian player would suit up in an NBA jersey.
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    Last edited by thugpinoy; 03-11-2011 at 12:26 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jovani_pineda
    young talented players are given a chance to go to the NBA. admit it, china has the factor. but, some players of quatar or jordan have chances. for the phil. players, i think it's just a dream to play although we have chances.
    a few years from now, I think Philippines will have an NBA player. . . RP is the largest basketball playing country that still has no NBA player, imagine 90 million Filipinos = 0 NBA player. . . Whereas other basketball crazy countries such as Lithuania (3.5 million) and Serbia (10 million) has 5 and 8 NBA players respectively in 2006 -07 NBA rosters . . . Commercial wise it is advantageous for the NBA to have a Filipino NBA player so as to capture the 90 million potential customers of NBA products. . . If I am the NBA commissioner I would not hesitate to make a move to influence NBA team owners to recruit the 1st Filipino NBA player. . . They already did it with Japan when Phoenix Suns invited Yuta Tabuse. . . What do you think why they do it? is it because Tabuse is exceptional player? I don't think so, there's a lot of players in the States or Asia who are better than Tabuse. They did it because of business, to expand the visibility of NBA in Japan and capture the Japanese market known for its high expenditures of jerseys and other sports merchandise. . . and NBA video games (NBA Live, which features Tabuse in its Japanese edition)

    And who do you think is better player between Tabuse and RP's Norwood? The answer is obvious. . .

    I believe if RP will win Tokushima battle and Norwood will deliver. . . It would not be farfetched that Filipinos will see their FIRST (NORWOOD, though not full blooded but still a Filipino who play in their national team) in NBA next season . . .
    Last edited by FilWelsh; 07-16-2007 at 10:16 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FilWelsh
    a few years from now, I think Philippines will have an NBA player. . . RP is the largest basketball playing country that still has no NBA player, imagine 90 million Filipinos = 0 NBA player. . . Whereas other basketball crazy countries such as Lithuania (3.5 million) and Serbia (10 million) has 5 and 8 NBA players respectively in 2006 -07 NBA rosters . . . Commercial wise it is advantageous for the NBA to have a Filipino NBA player so as to capture the 90 million potential customers of NBA products. . . If I am the NBA commissioner I would not hesitate to make a move to influence NBA team owners to recruit the 1st Filipino NBA player. . . They already did it with Japan when Phoenix Suns invited Yuta Tabuse. . . What do you think why they do it? is it because Tabuse is exceptional player? I don't think so, there's a lot of players in the States or Asia who are better than Tabuse. They did it because of business, to expand the visibility of NBA in Japan and capture the Japanese market known for its high expenditures of jerseys and other sports merchandise. . . and NBA video games (NBA Live, which features Tabuse in its Japanese edition)

    And who do you think is better player between Tabuse and RP's Norwood? The answer is obvious. . .

    I believe if RP will win Tokushima battle and Norwood will deliver. . . It would not be farfetched that Filipinos will see their FIRST (NORWOOD, though not full blooded but still a Filipino who play in their national team) in NBA next season . . .
    hmmm...good point!
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    I believe in 007's observation, but I think our failure to have at least one Filipino player in the NBA is also our fault; well, not ours in a real sense, but our basketball officials. The PBA is one of those who should be faulted for making Philippine basketball a circus act and isolating its best players from the rest of the world. The political in-fighting within the BAP is another culprit. With coliseum attendance going to an all-time low, the PBA needed to shore up its image by giving a sense of relevance and purpose to what it is doing. What better way to do it than support a national cause -- the formation of a strong national basketball team. I was at the Araneta coliseum last week to watch the RP-China tussle and I can't help noticing many patrons leaving as soon as the RP-China game ended, without even waiting for the main event Alaska vs. Talk NText to start. The PBA needs a strong national team, and vice versa. It took too long for the PBA to realize that, but I am just glad it already did.

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    Senior Member saints13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andoks
    I believe in 007's observation, but I think our failure to have at least one Filipino player in the NBA is also our fault; well, not ours in a real sense, but our basketball officials. The PBA is one of those who should be faulted for making Philippine basketball a circus act and isolating its best players from the rest of the world. The political in-fighting within the BAP is another culprit. With coliseum attendance going to an all-time low, the PBA needed to shore up its image by giving a sense of relevance and purpose to what it is doing. What better way to do it than support a national cause -- the formation of a strong national basketball team. I was at the Araneta coliseum last week to watch the RP-China tussle and I can't help noticing many patrons leaving as soon as the RP-China game ended, without even waiting for the main event Alaska vs. Talk NText to start. The PBA needs a strong national team, and vice versa. It took too long for the PBA to realize that, but I am just glad it already did.
    I agree bro! very well said
    It's ironic to see limited efforts from players with maximum salary.
    I wish they would apply "sabermetrics" in those financially challenged PBA teams to acquire players who are value for their money.

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    Senior Member thugpinoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andoks
    I believe in 007's observation, but I think our failure to have at least one Filipino player in the NBA is also our fault; well, not ours in a real sense, but our basketball officials. The PBA is one of those who should be faulted for making Philippine basketball a circus act and isolating its best players from the rest of the world. The political in-fighting within the BAP is another culprit. With coliseum attendance going to an all-time low, the PBA needed to shore up its image by giving a sense of relevance and purpose to what it is doing. What better way to do it than support a national cause -- the formation of a strong national basketball team. I was at the Araneta coliseum last week to watch the RP-China tussle and I can't help noticing many patrons leaving as soon as the RP-China game ended, without even waiting for the main event Alaska vs. Talk NText to start. The PBA needs a strong national team, and vice versa. It took too long for the PBA to realize that, but I am just glad it already did.

    Agree, why before even the main game would be Mobiline vs. Shell ( late 90's ) there is still people watching the game live at the Cuneta Astrodome compare today, many vacant seats during the FINALS?
    Ginebra ( Vince Hizon, Bal David, Jaworski, Locsin ) at the first game, but the people would stay and watch the 2nd game even if its very dangerous there at Libertad ( cuneta astrodome ) at night.
    whats missing today that PBA have during those times?
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    Last edited by thugpinoy; 03-11-2011 at 12:27 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thugpinoy
    Agree, why before even the main game would be Mobiline vs. Shell ( late 90's ) there is still people watching the game live at the Cuneta Astrodome compare today, many vacant seats during the FINALS?
    Ginebra ( Vince Hizon, Bal David, Jaworski, Locsin ) at the first game, but the people would stay and watch the 2nd game even if its very dangerous there at Libertad ( cuneta astrodome ) at night.
    whats missing today that PBA have during those times?

    This is off-topic, but allow me to post my reply.

    I hear a lot of stories from older people that the quality of Basketball today is not as good as it was during the era Jaworski. Some would even claim that they will not watch PBA again because of low-quality games. Another reason is because many are not in favor of Fil-Foreigners. They say the PBA is not about Philippine Basketball. During the time of Jaworski, there were still Fil-Foreigners, only that the media did not make a big deal out of them. Even Jaworski himself is a Fil-Foreigner. These people who claim that Basketball quality is declining only loved basketball, in my opinion, because they had their "Basketball Idols". When these "Idols" retired, they lost interest in basketball. Having our best players not play in major international competitions contributed heavily in the loss of interest in Philippine Basketball. We hear older people say that during their time, Philippine Basketball was very competitive. This was also the time when interest in basketball was at a high. Now that we are, again, sending our best players to international tournaments, interest in Philippine basketball will slowly rise.

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