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Thread: Philippines Cadet/Developmental Team

  1. #5521
    Senior Member interxavierxxx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ja.he View Post
    Another thing is Korea loves to use 3-2 zone defense. There is also a correlation between defense formation and transition offense. Notice that? When 3-2 zone defense becomes successful, 3 players at the top of the formation can easily run for fast breaks. This is one of korea’s Bread and butter.
    The zone is supposed to be susceptible to offensive rebounds but as our big men are no taller than Korea's (sans Blatche), this disadvantage is nullified.

    We have yet to see a Blatche-led Gilas against Korea.
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  2. #5522
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    Quote Originally Posted by interxavierxxx View Post
    The zone is supposed to be susceptible to offensive rebounds but as our big men are no taller than Korea's (sans Blatche), this disadvantage is nullified.

    We have yet to see a Blatche-led Gilas against Korea.
    Yeah... Korea always lucky that everytime we face us, We don't have Blatche at that time... maybe he will be the difference maker in the match up vs Korea, even w/ Ratliffe.. They always rattled vs Haddadi led Iran, and we all know Blatche always have Haddadi's numbers!!! I hope before Blatche retires for Gilas, I want to see a Blatche led Gilas vs Korea even w/ Ratliffe..

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    Quote Originally Posted by robert0326 View Post
    Yeah... Korea always lucky that everytime we face us, We don't have Blatche at that time... maybe he will be the difference maker in the match up vs Korea, even w/ Ratliffe.. They always rattled vs Haddadi led Iran, and we all know Blatche always have Haddadi's numbers!!! I hope before Blatche retires for Gilas, I want to see a Blatche led Gilas vs Korea even w/ Ratliffe..
    Could it be that Korea always have trouble vs. Iran mainly becoz Iran's defensive ploy isn't to collapse everytime a Korean player penetrates the defense? I mean everytime a korean player drives to the lane, the iranian perimeter defenders would just stay in front of their men & clog the passing lanes instead of collapsing. Hence, the Korean penetrator will have no kick-out option & would be compelled to finish the drive off Hamed Hadadi's towering defense. In short, the Iranians could defend like this becoz they have a 7-foot-2 center who is such an intimidating & imposing rim protector. Mahirap para sa isang penetrator to finish his drive against someone like Hadadi.

    Unfortunately, Gilas doesn't have someone like Hadadi. Blatche may be a good shot blocker but he is no 7-footer.
    "A king may move a man, a father may claim a son, but that man can also move himself, and only then does that man truly begin his own game. Remember that howsoever you are played or by whom, your soul is in your keeping alone, even though those who presume to play you be kings or men of power, when you stand before God, you cannot say, 'But I was told by others to do thus,' or that virtue was not convenient at the time. This will not suffice." - King Baldwin IV

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAMSKIE View Post
    Could it be that Korea always have trouble vs. Iran mainly becoz Iran's defensive ploy isn't to collapse everytime a Korean player penetrates the defense? I mean everytime a korean player drives to the lane, the iranian perimeter defenders would just stay in front of their men & clog the passing lanes instead of collapsing. Hence, the Korean penetrator will have no kick-out option & would be compelled to finish the drive off Hamed Hadadi's towering defense. In short, the Iranians could defend like this becoz they have a 7-foot-2 center who is such an intimidating & imposing rim protector. Mahirap para sa isang penetrator to finish his drive against someone like Hadadi.

    Unfortunately, Gilas doesn't have someone like Hadadi. Blatche may be a good shot blocker but he is no 7-footer.
    probably the key is for them not to make so may three point shots.Make them go for the lay up but there has to be a very good shot blocker (or two) every time, to put things simple, make them miss most of their shots (which is not a simple thing to do of course).The problem now is they have a solid post player in Ricardo Rattliffe.The game plan is always concentrate on defense against Korea and pray that the offensive game will be no problem (frustrate them and outscore them).
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAMSKIE View Post
    Could it be that Korea always have trouble vs. Iran mainly becoz Iran's defensive ploy isn't to collapse everytime a Korean player penetrates the defense? I mean everytime a korean player drives to the lane, the iranian perimeter defenders would just stay in front of their men & clog the passing lanes instead of collapsing. Hence, the Korean penetrator will have no kick-out option & would be compelled to finish the drive off Hamed Hadadi's towering defense. In short, the Iranians could defend like this becoz they have a 7-foot-2 center who is such an intimidating & imposing rim protector. Mahirap para sa isang penetrator to finish his drive against someone like Hadadi.

    Unfortunately, Gilas doesn't have someone like Hadadi. Blatche may be a good shot blocker but he is no 7-footer.
    I think Iran just have more practice time that's why they can read the plays of Korea. Especially all the ball screens Koreans do to open their shooters, and what kind of PnR defense should be apply to specific players.

    Remember 2013 Fiba Asia. We didn't have the height but we were scrappy and physical with Koreans. Usually we have Pingris, De Ocampo and Japeth to man the paint. Once again the luxury of having a very long preparation time did us well. They know when to switch does PnR or ball screen plays. We disrupted their passing lanes. Just like Coach Tab, we have a very shifty defense, always on are feet and able to close out on shooters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex07 View Post
    probably the key is for them not to make so may three point shots.Make them go for the lay up but there has to be a very good shot blocker (or two) every time, to put things simple, make them miss most of their shots (which is not a simple thing to do of course).The problem now is they have a solid post player in Ricardo Rattliffe.The game plan is always concentrate on defense against Korea and pray that the offensive game will be no problem (frustrate them and outscore them).
    Of course its always easier said than done. I don't know but it seems its a natural tendency for players/teams that everytime an offensive player drives/penetrates, the defense would collapse, hence the penetrator would have kick-out options in the outer wings or in the outside.

    I'm confident & optimistic that in the very near future with Kai Sotto (& AJ Edu who is showing potential to be a good shotblocker) being elevated in the senior level, we will have a tall rim protector to challenge the Korean penetrators & thus our perimeter defense need not to collapse but instead stay in front of their men to prevent kick-out passes from the penetrators.

    Quote Originally Posted by zairex View Post
    I think Iran just have more practice time that's why they can read the plays of Korea. Especially all the ball screens Koreans do to open their shooters, and what kind of PnR defense should be apply to specific players.

    Remember 2013 Fiba Asia. We didn't have the height but we were scrappy and physical with Koreans. Usually we have Pingris, De Ocampo and Japeth to man the paint. Once again the luxury of having a very long preparation time did us well. They know when to switch does PnR or ball screen plays. We disrupted their passing lanes. Just like Coach Tab, we have a very shifty defense, always on are feet and able to close out on shooters.
    I couldn't agree with you more. Just like offensive plays, defensive patterns also take time to master.

    During the 2013 FIBA Asia Championship, we had 2 solid months of preparation & had training camps & tune-up games in Lithuania & New Zealand. Same with our 2015 FIBA Asia Championship team w/c also had almost the same preparation period & with tune-up games in Europe, Jones Cup & Manila Invitational Tournament. Kita naman natin yung resulta. We won silver medals.

    On the other hand, our 2019 FIBA World Cup-bound team had about 10 days (or even less) to prepare for every window, and as we saw it, we barely made it to the World Cup. Pasang awa.
    "A king may move a man, a father may claim a son, but that man can also move himself, and only then does that man truly begin his own game. Remember that howsoever you are played or by whom, your soul is in your keeping alone, even though those who presume to play you be kings or men of power, when you stand before God, you cannot say, 'But I was told by others to do thus,' or that virtue was not convenient at the time. This will not suffice." - King Baldwin IV

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    https://www.spin.ph/basketball/how-p...e_featured_big

    Pampanga basketball program should be replicated around the country. Here's why

    OVER the past few years, Pampanga has emerged as the hotbed of basketball in the Philippines. The province has produced the likes of Arwind Santos, Calvin Abueva, Ian Sangalang, Jayson Castro, and Japeth Aguilar in the PBA, and, with the way things are going, the well is far from drying up.



    Pampanga natives like Larry Muyang, Justin Baltazar, and Encho Serrano are all making waves in collegiate basketball, while St. Augustine Institute recently made headlines by ruling the Division 2 of the NBTC League national finals, thanks to the heroics of Brianne Angeles.

    The spike in the number of basketball stars emerging from the province is more than just luck, swore Alan 'Jacobs' Trinidad.

    “Ang programa namin, grassroots talaga,” said Trinidad, referring to the talent search and basketball program started more than 25 years ago in the province by Vice-Governor Dennis 'Delta' Pineda back when he was still a councilor in Lubao town.



    Since 1993, the province, Trinidad said, has been holding a summer camp for 250 kids in different age groups, but mostly from poor families. The camp runs for one month and the standouts are recruited to Pineda's stable.

    This year, for example, Trinidad said the kids should be born from 2002 to 2008 (11 to 17 years old) in order to be eligible for the training camp.



    About 40 are selected and enrolled in a school in Pampanga where the province spends for expenses such as food, accommodation, and miscellaneous fees.

    “Meron akong budget sa provincial government ng Pampanga for sports development program. May volleyball at basketball pero fino-focus namin basketball,” said Trinidad, who is the province's longtime sports coordinator.

    “’Yung mga makukuha namin, dine-develop namin. We give them free transportation from point of origin and then back to their homes plus free food. Tapos ‘yung mga mapipili namin doon, we send them to one school,” added Trinidad.

    There's a reason why the program gives chances to kids from less-fortunate families, Trinidad said.

    “At saka ‘yung mga pinipili namin, ‘yung mga batang mahihirap talaga na hindi makapag-aral. Kasi minsan, kapag anak mayaman, kapag nahihirapan, uuwi na ‘yan, sasabihin, hindi na niya kaya. Masisira ang programa. Pero dito, lahat talagang pursigido,” he said.


    Those selected undergo rigid training at the Bren Guiao Sports Complex in San Fernando, which has a basketball court and a track oval. They are also tested in several competitions like the Central Luzon Region Athletic Association (CLRAA).

    “Kaya ang mga bata lumalakas. One year ang training namin,” said Trinidad.

    Most of the products are recruited to play for Manila-based schools where they go on to play either in the UAAP or NCAA. Those who stay go to college and play in the Universities and Colleges Athletic Association of Pampanga (UCAAP), a league organized by Pineda.



    Count Arwind Santos among the biggest beneficiaries of the program.

    The wiry forward was one of the illustrious graduates of the training camp. After playing for Far Eastern University where he won two UAAP titles, Santos went on to have a successful PBA career where he has won an MVP plum.

    But more than the basketball training he underwent in the program, Santos said Pineda went the extra mile and took in Arwind who by then was already the family's breadwinner after the death of his father.

    Santos even lived in Pineda’s residence.

    “Ang dami namin. Marami akong nakasabay. Ang kagandahan nito, ako ‘yung isang player na nag-ningning sa mata ni Vice Gov. Ako lang ‘yung pinatira niya sa bahay nila. Nagulat din ako dahil tinuring niya akong parang anak. Kaya ‘yung mga anak niya, para ko na ring mga kapatid,” said Santos.

    “Kinwento ko ‘yung buhay ko kay Delta Pineda na sa akin naka-depende ‘yung pamilya ko. Sabi niya, pagbutihin mo lang at susuportahan niya ako at pangangailangan ko,” the San Miguel star added.

    The success of the program is best reflected in the 13 Pampanga players who are now in the roster of the 12 PBA teams when the 2019 season started - the most from any province, even Cebu (10).

    Aside from Santos, Abueva, Aguilar and Sangalang, Pampanga has also produced other PBA players like JC Intal, Javee Mocon, Lervin Flores, Ronald Pascual, Michael Miranda, Michael Calisaan, Dexter Maiquez, and Russel Escoto, among others.

    Down the line, Muyang has been making an impact with Letran, winning the Rookie of the Year honor in Season 94 of the NCAA while Baltazar, Serrano, and Mark Dyke are mainstays of the La Salle varsity team.

    John Lloyd Clemente is playing for National University, while 6-foot-9 cager Jeremiah Pangalangan is set to suit up for College of Saint Benilde.

    At present, Pampanga is a six-time CLRAA champion and a two-time silver medalist in the Palarong Pambansa. By the way, all of the members of the St. Augustine team that won the Division II title in the NBTC national finals are from the program.

    “Hindi naman ‘yan nakukuha sa edad. Nakukuha sa preparasyon at sa galing. Magtiwala kayo sa sarili niyo, matapang kayo, wag kayo matakot,” said Trinidad.



    Trinidad admitted other local government units (LGUs) have asked about their basketball program, but are surprised to learn the level of support and the finances the province, as well as Pineda, is putting into the program.

    “Tumatawag sa akin Cebu, Cagayan De Oro, kapag sinasabi ko ‘yung programa, (sabi nila) mahirap pala kasi kailangan may suporta sa local government. Aside from local government, may sariling funding rin si Vice Gov,” said Trinidad.

    Trinidad is proud to see the province now considered as the number one source of talent in basketball.

    “Etong year na ‘to, medyo maganda. Kung titignan mo, number of players, Kapampangan against Cebu, mas marami ang Kapampangan. Sa UAAP, NCAA, D-League, PBA lalo, maraming Kapampangan diyan.

    “Dati kapag sinabi mong PBA, Cebuano. Ngayon, hindi,” said Trinidad.

  8. #5528
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRodster21 View Post
    https://www.spin.ph/basketball/how-p...e_featured_big

    Pampanga basketball program should be replicated around the country. Here's why

    OVER the past few years, Pampanga has emerged as the hotbed of basketball in the Philippines. The province has produced the likes of Arwind Santos, Calvin Abueva, Ian Sangalang, Jayson Castro, and Japeth Aguilar in the PBA, and, with the way things are going, the well is far from drying up.



    Pampanga natives like Larry Muyang, Justin Baltazar, and Encho Serrano are all making waves in collegiate basketball, while St. Augustine Institute recently made headlines by ruling the Division 2 of the NBTC League national finals, thanks to the heroics of Brianne Angeles.

    The spike in the number of basketball stars emerging from the province is more than just luck, swore Alan 'Jacobs' Trinidad.

    “Ang programa namin, grassroots talaga,” said Trinidad, referring to the talent search and basketball program started more than 25 years ago in the province by Vice-Governor Dennis 'Delta' Pineda back when he was still a councilor in Lubao town.



    Since 1993, the province, Trinidad said, has been holding a summer camp for 250 kids in different age groups, but mostly from poor families. The camp runs for one month and the standouts are recruited to Pineda's stable.

    This year, for example, Trinidad said the kids should be born from 2002 to 2008 (11 to 17 years old) in order to be eligible for the training camp.



    About 40 are selected and enrolled in a school in Pampanga where the province spends for expenses such as food, accommodation, and miscellaneous fees.

    “Meron akong budget sa provincial government ng Pampanga for sports development program. May volleyball at basketball pero fino-focus namin basketball,” said Trinidad, who is the province's longtime sports coordinator.

    “’Yung mga makukuha namin, dine-develop namin. We give them free transportation from point of origin and then back to their homes plus free food. Tapos ‘yung mga mapipili namin doon, we send them to one school,” added Trinidad.

    There's a reason why the program gives chances to kids from less-fortunate families, Trinidad said.

    “At saka ‘yung mga pinipili namin, ‘yung mga batang mahihirap talaga na hindi makapag-aral. Kasi minsan, kapag anak mayaman, kapag nahihirapan, uuwi na ‘yan, sasabihin, hindi na niya kaya. Masisira ang programa. Pero dito, lahat talagang pursigido,” he said.


    Those selected undergo rigid training at the Bren Guiao Sports Complex in San Fernando, which has a basketball court and a track oval. They are also tested in several competitions like the Central Luzon Region Athletic Association (CLRAA).

    “Kaya ang mga bata lumalakas. One year ang training namin,” said Trinidad.

    Most of the products are recruited to play for Manila-based schools where they go on to play either in the UAAP or NCAA. Those who stay go to college and play in the Universities and Colleges Athletic Association of Pampanga (UCAAP), a league organized by Pineda.



    Count Arwind Santos among the biggest beneficiaries of the program.

    The wiry forward was one of the illustrious graduates of the training camp. After playing for Far Eastern University where he won two UAAP titles, Santos went on to have a successful PBA career where he has won an MVP plum.

    But more than the basketball training he underwent in the program, Santos said Pineda went the extra mile and took in Arwind who by then was already the family's breadwinner after the death of his father.

    Santos even lived in Pineda’s residence.

    “Ang dami namin. Marami akong nakasabay. Ang kagandahan nito, ako ‘yung isang player na nag-ningning sa mata ni Vice Gov. Ako lang ‘yung pinatira niya sa bahay nila. Nagulat din ako dahil tinuring niya akong parang anak. Kaya ‘yung mga anak niya, para ko na ring mga kapatid,” said Santos.

    “Kinwento ko ‘yung buhay ko kay Delta Pineda na sa akin naka-depende ‘yung pamilya ko. Sabi niya, pagbutihin mo lang at susuportahan niya ako at pangangailangan ko,” the San Miguel star added.

    The success of the program is best reflected in the 13 Pampanga players who are now in the roster of the 12 PBA teams when the 2019 season started - the most from any province, even Cebu (10).

    Aside from Santos, Abueva, Aguilar and Sangalang, Pampanga has also produced other PBA players like JC Intal, Javee Mocon, Lervin Flores, Ronald Pascual, Michael Miranda, Michael Calisaan, Dexter Maiquez, and Russel Escoto, among others.

    Down the line, Muyang has been making an impact with Letran, winning the Rookie of the Year honor in Season 94 of the NCAA while Baltazar, Serrano, and Mark Dyke are mainstays of the La Salle varsity team.

    John Lloyd Clemente is playing for National University, while 6-foot-9 cager Jeremiah Pangalangan is set to suit up for College of Saint Benilde.

    At present, Pampanga is a six-time CLRAA champion and a two-time silver medalist in the Palarong Pambansa. By the way, all of the members of the St. Augustine team that won the Division II title in the NBTC national finals are from the program.

    “Hindi naman ‘yan nakukuha sa edad. Nakukuha sa preparasyon at sa galing. Magtiwala kayo sa sarili niyo, matapang kayo, wag kayo matakot,” said Trinidad.



    Trinidad admitted other local government units (LGUs) have asked about their basketball program, but are surprised to learn the level of support and the finances the province, as well as Pineda, is putting into the program.

    “Tumatawag sa akin Cebu, Cagayan De Oro, kapag sinasabi ko ‘yung programa, (sabi nila) mahirap pala kasi kailangan may suporta sa local government. Aside from local government, may sariling funding rin si Vice Gov,” said Trinidad.

    Trinidad is proud to see the province now considered as the number one source of talent in basketball.

    “Etong year na ‘to, medyo maganda. Kung titignan mo, number of players, Kapampangan against Cebu, mas marami ang Kapampangan. Sa UAAP, NCAA, D-League, PBA lalo, maraming Kapampangan diyan.

    “Dati kapag sinabi mong PBA, Cebuano. Ngayon, hindi,” said Trinidad.
    Just my opinion, I think it is much better for stable to handle even the professional career of their player, so the they have source of fund to finance the training of up coming talents

  9. #5529
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marlon View Post
    Just my opinion, I think it is much better for stable to handle even the professional career of their player, so the they have source of fund to finance the training of up coming talents
    No need for additional funds as the Vice Gov Delta Pineda haa the Jueteng money at his disposal, claimed to earning around 10 Million as day due to its operation in Region 3, and even in other Luzon provinces...Though of giving back the money that they got from the poor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sajubeads View Post
    No need for additional funds as the Vice Gov Delta Pineda haa the Jueteng money at his disposal, claimed to earning around 10 Million as day due to its operation in Region 3, and even in other Luzon provinces...Though of giving back the money that they got from the poor.
    Not just in pampanga, but even from other provinces, like stakeholders in cebu so they have source of fund for the training of their recruit

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marlon View Post
    Not just in pampanga, but even from other provinces, like stakeholders in cebu so they have source of fund for the training of their recruit
    If you're a college team would you be comfortable in dealing with known gambling lords?

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    Quote Originally Posted by thatweirdguy View Post
    If you're a college team would you be comfortable in dealing with known gambling lords?
    No one argue about being gambling Lord of pineda or from illegal gambling the source of fund of pampanga talent, my point is, training is expensive and need steady source, so instead just any one posed as manager, off course they have cut from salary of their talent, stable is the one should manage the career of their talent so they have source of.fund for the training of their up coming talent

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    Quote Originally Posted by thatweirdguy View Post
    If you're a college team would you be comfortable in dealing with known gambling lords?
    more comfortable than a drug lord or a war lord...And they can give you tips for a "good windfall". Dont get me wrong I just comparing underworld persons..

    You dont want to deal with people who guns and goons to control power...
    To becomes Asia's Best, we need to compete against the World's Best..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marlon View Post
    No one argue about being gambling Lord of pineda or from illegal gambling the source of fund of pampanga talent, my point is, training is expensive and need steady source, so instead just any one posed as manager, off course they have cut from salary of their talent, stable is the one should manage the career of their talent so they have source of.fund for the training of their up coming talent
    Aren't they doing that already? Anyway I don't think they're at risk of running low on funds. Business is booming if you know what I mean.

    Off topic: Our local allegedly narco politican has a very good basketball team composed of former college and dleague players. They're demolishing every local leagues back in my province. I also heard that pushers are really active during games.

    I'd rather not deal or watch games with such shady individuals. You don't know what kind of "crowd" they bring in during games.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thatweirdguy View Post
    Aren't they doing that already? Anyway I don't think they're at risk of running low on funds. Business is booming if you know what I mean.

    Off topic: Our local allegedly narco politican has a very good basketball team composed of former college and dleague players. They're demolishing every local leagues back in my province. I also heard that pushers are really active during games.

    I'd rather not deal or watch games with such shady individuals. You don't know what kind of "crowd" they bring in during games.
    Wow. Politics is very much intertwined with basketball here in the Philippines and Rafe Bartholomew incredibly described it in his book Pacific Rims. Since politics is dirty and sourcing money is hard, funding for advocacies like this tend to be an opportunity for Patrons of illegal activities to showcase goodwill. A strategy to temper peoples negative reactions to their good fortunes from the perceived immorality.

    And yes, schools are comfortable dealing with allegedly scrupulous patrons because first and foremost there is no solid evidence of their alleged illegal activities. That is why many opportunists in power and politics prefer for us to remain poor or at least retain the status quo in order for them to take advantage of our limitations and for them to be our redeemer.

    Many politicians in our country lack the economic aptitude and those in position tried to get rich by either graft or corruption because they don't know how to do business. And if ever they will do business, they are doing it to clean their money while their business is not earning even declaring bankruptcy and yet they are overly rich. Imagine how can a politician with no college degree (worst are those with higher degrees) neither with experience in running a business is still getting wealthier.

    Whether we like it or not, we are in the Philippines and maybe even supporting politically an immoral candidate or leader. MPBL is very political because of its connection to locality, and just how do you think some of the teams fund their team. What is their source of income? Is it even enough to run a team that continually conduct games outside Metro Manila.

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    Underestimating so called "poor" people, why does pineda earned so big in that small time lottery business, its because people have money to spend for it for leisure...The poorest people are coming from war torn parts of Philippines, workers and peasants for land lords and the ones who force to work and live here in manila without relatives (who lives comfortably in metro)
    To becomes Asia's Best, we need to compete against the World's Best..

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    You don't really need a strong evidence when everyone knows your dirty. It's like an open "secret" that everybody just accepted because there's really nothing anyone can do about it.


    I hate in when someone uses basketball as a vehicle for something sinister like gambling, politics etc. Please stay out of our past time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thatweirdguy View Post
    You don't really need a strong evidence when everyone knows your dirty. It's like an open "secret" that everybody just accepted because there's really nothing anyone can do about it.


    I hate in when someone uses basketball as a vehicle for something sinister like gambling, politics etc. Please stay out of our past time.
    that gambling makes leagues like abl and mpbl alive and kicking..

    And rakes millions of dollars to fiba...

    Some powerhouse sport club dont have real business but why they burn money to these sport teams?

    Sports isnt just a pastime its like cockfighting your being hooked not because its a pastime. its because youre earning from it ..
    To becomes Asia's Best, we need to compete against the World's Best..

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    Quote Originally Posted by reamily View Post
    Underestimating so called "poor" people, why does pineda earned so big in that small time lottery business, its because people have money to spend for it for leisure...The poorest people are coming from war torn parts of Philippines, workers and peasants for land lords and the ones who force to work and live here in manila without relatives (who lives comfortably in metro)
    Insightful. Yes, people might spend some on leisure or vices, however the concern is illegal activities do not pay taxes. Instead of remitting to the government, Politicians incredulously prefer they remit to them in exchange of protection from our government itself. While those in war torn areas have a different dynamic of politics and poverty, imagine a Filipino Billionaire Politician living in one of the poorest province in the country.

    It is true land lords rule in the countryside especially Mindanao and those landlords are the one pushing for the autonomy of their area so that government will have limited intervention. If today with the current political system Landlords are already indispensable, imagine the absolute power they will acquire if given full autonomy. They will monopolize every opportunities from business, education, religion and other human/civil rights. But if you won't agree with them they will just go to war with you because they are fighting for their ancestral land "kuno".

    Imagine if those illegal activities became legal they would be paying taxes to fund other sports while those Landlords will be replaced by progressive thinkers then distribute the province wealth among those in poverty we might see more Barrocas, Amers, and RR Garcias in the future. So for now we are part of the generation who need to be forward thinkers and critically choose leaders who will do more than just uniting us but should be more economically inclined.

    By the way GMA is from Pampanga one of the best economist, yun lang convicted Plunder at House speaker na. Sayang! LoL.

  20. #5540
    Senior Member
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    Oct 2013
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    Country: New Zealand

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    ricci rivero is almost as tall as colin sexton. He had like a second growth spurt lol. Ricci, JGDL and especially Thirdy should all try their luck in the US Summer League/G League. And hopefully even Kobe Paras.

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