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Thread: Philippines Senior National Team Thread

  1. #2161
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinoybrat View Post
    oh really, because for a Filipino-american player needs to secure a Philippine Passport before he turns 16 in order to represent the Philippines. does this rule applies to Puerto Rico?
    there is no such thing as a puertorrican passport
    as long as a player with puertorrican heritage has not represented another country in a FIBA tournament after his 16 birthday, he is elegible to represent Puerto Rico.

    Quote Originally Posted by ak1105 View Post
    we got a lot of talents both in NCAA div 1 whose mother or father (or both) are filipino citizens during their birth but can't play for Philippines because they did not acquire passport before 16..so good luck if your contention only is that they are their grandsons..
    we been lucky for quite some time then. different rules apply.

    And it might surprise most of yall, but Puerto Rico doesnt really have a naturalized player. We have not used a naturalized player for almost 30 years.
    Last edited by J-Mart; 02-09-2014 at 04:37 PM.

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    The thing is, FIBA does not honor a country's law/citizenship. If the player is born outside of the country which he chooses to play for, FIBA requires that the player show proof of citizenship before turning 16 years old. Law of the country is not a proof of citizenship as what FIBA threw at Philippines. It requires physical documents like a passport.

    How about that law on Puerto Rico? How does that satisfy the latest(around 2010?) FIBA rules? Pls clarify this to us. Thanks.
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Mart View Post
    there is no such thing as a puertorrican passport
    as long as a player with puertorrican heritage has not represented another country in a FIBA tournament after his 16 birthday, he is elegible to represent Puerto Rico.


    we been lucky for quite some time then. different rules apply.

    And it might surprise most of yall, but Puerto Rico doesnt really have a naturalized player. We have not used a naturalized player for almost 30 years.
    hi there J-Mart. thanks for dropping by.

    is Puerto Rico an independent country or territory of United States. If it is a territory, what does that mean, Puerto Ricans are also US citizens and US citizens in the mainland enjoy all rights and privileges of US citizens?

    thanks.

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    Dear Leader J-Mart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ador Cruzado View Post
    The thing is, FIBA does not honor a country's law/citizenship. If the player is born outside of the country which he chooses to play for, FIBA requires that the player show proof of citizenship before turning 16 years old. Law of the country is not a proof of citizenship as what FIBA threw at Philippines. It requires physical documents like a passport.

    How about that law on Puerto Rico? How does that satisfy the latest(around 2010?) FIBA rules? Pls clarify this to us. Thanks.
    There is NO puertorrican passport or citizenship, therefore FIBA uses heritage as the method of elegibility for players. Basketball Federation have to prove (via US Birth Certificate) the birthplace of the player, parent or grandparent. If the player has represented another nation after his 16th birthday, then the player is not elegible to compete for Puerto Rico (ex Carmelo Anthony with USA, Kleon Penn with BVI).

    For Puerto Rico to naturalize a basketball player, he must prove 3 years of residence in the island and he must not be a american citizen. The only player to be naturalized is Jorge Bryan Diaz, a son of a ecuatorian and a puertorrican born in NY but raised and developed in the island, the FBPR had to prove to FIBA that he was raised and developed for them to approve him as a special case. He has never played for the Adult team yet and Im not sure if he played for a U-21, U-19 or U-17.

    The difference in the 2010 Rules is that they started allowing grandsons again. FIBA prohibited grandson of Puertorricans in 2001 only allowing sons of ricans.

    Quote Originally Posted by budz17 View Post
    hi there J-Mart. thanks for dropping by.

    is Puerto Rico an independent country or territory of United States. If it is a territory, what does that mean, Puerto Ricans are also US citizens and US citizens in the mainland enjoy all rights and privileges of US citizens?

    thanks.
    Commonwealth of the USA. A colony of the United States. Born american citizens. Heavily recruited by the armed forced. Dont have right to vote for the president of the USA and dont have a vote on the house or senate of the USA. We have our own state goverment subject to the federal goverment of the USA. Right and priviledges of a US citizen? is that a joke?
    Last edited by J-Mart; 02-09-2014 at 05:23 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Mart View Post
    There is NO puertorrican passport or citizenship, therefore FIBA uses heritage as the method of elegibility for players. Basketball Federation have to prove (via US Birth Certificate) the birthplace of the player, parent or grandparent. If the player has represented another nation after his 16th birthday, then the player is not elegible to compete for Puerto Rico (ex Carmelo Anthony with USA, Kleon Penn with BVI).

    For Puerto Rico to naturalize a basketball player, he must prove 3 years of residence in the island and he must not be a american citizen. The only player to be naturalized is Jorge Bryan Diaz, a son of a ecuatorian and a puertorrican born in NY but raised and developed in the island, the FBPR had to prove to FIBA that he was raised and developed for them to approve him as a special case. He has never played for the Adult team yet and Im not sure if he played for a U-21, U-19 or U-17.

    The difference in the 2010 Rules is that they started allowing grandsons again. FIBA prohibited grandson of Puertorricans in 2001 only allowing sons of ricans.


    Commonwealth of the USA. A colony of the United States. Born american citizens. Heavily recruited by the armed forced. Dont have right to vote for the president of the USA and dont have a vote on the house or senate of the USA. We have our own state goverment subject to the federal goverment of the USA. Right and priviledges of a US citizen? is that a joke?
    I was only asking because I did'nt know anything about puerto rico's political situation.

    thanks anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by budz17 View Post
    I was only asking because I did'nt know anything about puerto rico's political situation.

    thanks anyway.
    the land of the free and the home of the brave is the greatest joke I've ever heard. There is no such thing as liberty and the american dream is more overrated than Japeth Aguilar was when u guys found he was a pinoy

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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Mart View Post
    the land of the free and the home of the brave is the greatest joke I've ever heard. There is no such thing as liberty and the american dream is more overrated than Japeth Aguilar was when u guys found he was a pinoy
    Hello new sig.

    We did this to ourselves though. Anyway, good luck to the filipinos. The addition of Blatche and/or McGee will definitely be a help come Spain. Scola had a hard time not getting in foul trouble against us, maybe you can do the same. Croatia hasnt shown they can lose against asian teams, and Greece seems inconsistent this last few years.
    Quote Originally Posted by J-Mart View Post
    the land of the free and the home of the brave is the greatest joke I've ever heard. There is no such thing as liberty and the american dream is more overrated than Japeth Aguilar was when u guys found he was a pinoy
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Mart View Post
    the land of the free and the home of the brave is the greatest joke I've ever heard. There is no such thing as liberty and the american dream is more overrated than Japeth Aguilar was when u guys found he was a pinoy
    What do you mean "found he was a pinoy"? Aguilar was born and raised here to two Philippine citizens. Even played college basketball here for two years before he transferred to WKU. Not at all similar to Fil-Am players.
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    One benefit I’m experiencing with all the talk of naturalising McGee and Blatche is the attraction we’re getting from other teams wanting to play tune-up games with Gilas. In my discussions , when I throw in those names, eyebrows are raised . "like really we have an opportunity to play an NBA center" ! Don’t underestimate the value and attention that brings. Put it this way if Chinese Tiapei or Japan said : do you want to play us for a tune-up game we have “ Javalle McGee” , that changes things all together from a team with no recognised “global player” to a team that suddenly has an NBA rotation center, that changes things

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    Quote Originally Posted by analyzed View Post
    One benefit I’m experiencing with all the talk of naturalising McGee and Blatche is the attraction we’re getting from other teams wanting to play tune-up games with Gilas. In my discussions , when I throw in those names, eyebrows are raised . "like really we have an opportunity to play an NBA center" ! Don’t underestimate the value and attention that brings. Put it this way if Chinese Tiapei or Japan said : do you want to play us for a tune-up game we have “ Javalle McGee” , that changes things all together from a team with no recognised “global player” to a team that suddenly has an NBA rotation center, that changes things
    its called "level up"..atleast in paper..

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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Mart View Post
    the land of the free and the home of the brave is the greatest joke I've ever heard. There is no such thing as liberty and the american dream is more overrated than Japeth Aguilar was when u guys found he was a pinoy
    Japeth is 101 percent pinoy..played only college balls (well quite a few games) in US

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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Mart View Post
    There is NO puertorrican passport or citizenship, therefore FIBA uses heritage as the method of elegibility for players. Basketball Federation have to prove (via US Birth Certificate) the birthplace of the player, parent or grandparent. If the player has represented another nation after his 16th birthday, then the player is not elegible to compete for Puerto Rico (ex Carmelo Anthony with USA, Kleon Penn with BVI).

    For Puerto Rico to naturalize a basketball player, he must prove 3 years of residence in the island and he must not be a american citizen. The only player to be naturalized is Jorge Bryan Diaz, a son of a ecuatorian and a puertorrican born in NY but raised and developed in the island, the FBPR had to prove to FIBA that he was raised and developed for them to approve him as a special case. He has never played for the Adult team yet and Im not sure if he played for a U-21, U-19 or U-17.

    The difference in the 2010 Rules is that they started allowing grandsons again. FIBA prohibited grandson of Puertorricans in 2001 only allowing sons of ricans.


    Commonwealth of the USA. A colony of the United States. Born american citizens. Heavily recruited by the armed forced. Dont have right to vote for the president of the USA and dont have a vote on the house or senate of the USA. We have our own state goverment subject to the federal goverment of the USA. Right and priviledges of a US citizen? is that a joke?
    in the basketball point of view, you are indeed lucky..its boundary to double standard but its not your fault though if FIBA has this kind of rules to territories like yours..

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak1105 View Post
    Japeth is 101 percent pinoy..played only college balls (well quite a few games) in US
    not questioning his elegibility,but how good this forum thought he was when he showed up to the philipino basketball scene

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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Mart View Post
    the land of the free and the home of the brave is the greatest joke I've ever heard. There is no such thing as liberty and the american dream is more overrated than Japeth Aguilar was when u guys found he was a pinoy
    I love jokes. But I've heard funnier.

    Liberty, mom, apple pie, and the American way totally fictitious? I take it you'd rather have Assad's brand of democracy then?

    OT: btw, whatever happened to Jerome Mincy?

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    For continued success of Gilas, it is imperative also for MVP franchises, TNT and Meralco , to stockpile for NT-level talents so that we can have ready supply of players especially come 2017 where the home and away format will start. By that time , it is impossible to get players from PBA especially if it is in ongoing season.

    Technically, there is no question with regards to the Nationality of Greg Slaughter because he has played in FIBA Asia Champions Cup, the question though, was he classified as a local at that time or as an Import. Sir Nards, Analyzed can you answer on this.

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    Qunito Henson's column : http://www.philstar.com/sports/2014/...naturalization

    Looks like Henson got his source from one of forum's poster here named Joao Paolo. Or it's Joao Paolo obtained what Quinito has written in his column. Or they are the same person. Either way they have some infos wrong like Adama Louis Adams of Senegal being a naturalized player which in fact a natural-born Senegalese. Quinito also wrote that John Holland and Richard Chaney are naturalized Puerto Ricans which is absolutely incorrect as both are considered Puerto Ricans by heritage due of them being grandchildren of native Puerto Rican. http://germanhoops.wordpress.com/201...o-see-me-play/ plain stupidity of Quinito of not having researched properly before writing a column in publication. Indolent journalism at most

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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Mart View Post
    not questioning his elegibility,but how good this forum thought he was when he showed up to the philipino basketball scene
    Japeth Aguilar only played a few games in the US. He played here in the Philippines all his life. He played for Ateneo Blue Eagles in college for two years. He is not new to Filipino fans so there was no 'scene'. He was seen as something special because he has the height and the athleticism which is rare for a Filipino, especially the height. Have you seen our forwards? They are standing 6'4(Pingris) and 6'5(R. De Ocampo)..And previous years we had 6'6 Raymundo and 6'6 K. Williams(fil-am). Most forward or center in our country does not exceed 6'6 with the exception of Filipino-foreigners. So having a homegrown Aguilar who is tall and athletic and was given opportunity to play outside the country was considered big. Of course having been in the US, people thought he developed well.
    Anyway, he did well against Balkman when they played each other in the PBA when Japeth was still with Global Port and Balkman was still sane.

    This was Aguilar during his UAAP(Philppine NCAA) days:


    This was Aguilar after his US NCAA stint(plagued by injuries):



    So Puerto Rico has no citizenship? You can get any player as long as they have ancestry linked to your country? How could they tell the ancestry when Puerto Rico is almost like US citizen? Im really clueless and curious. Thanks! Puerto Rico is lucky. How could FIBA let them and our pure Filipinos not. Poor Ryan Reyes.
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    Puerto Rico utilizing players of Rican heritage is actually doing Gilas a favor. Since they can't naturalize Americans who else they gonna naturalize? Jorge Bryan Diaz? I think FIBA will approve him as natural-born as one of his parent is a Rican. Also I doubt he will be named in the final 12 it's a long shot considering he will have Ricky Sanchez and Daniel Santiago to compete for.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ador Cruzado View Post
    Japeth Aguilar only played a few games in the US. He played here in the Philippines all his life. He played for Ateneo Blue Eagles in college for two years. He is not new to Filipino fans so there was no 'scene'. He was seen as something special because he has the height and the athleticism which is rare for a Filipino, especially the height. Have you seen our forwards? They are standing 6'4(Pingris) and 6'5(R. De Ocampo)..And previous years we had 6'6 Raymundo and 6'6 K. Williams(fil-am). Most forward or center in our country does not exceed 6'6 with the exception of Filipino-foreigners. So having a homegrown Aguilar who is tall and athletic and was given opportunity to play outside the country was considered big. Of course having been in the US, people thought he developed well.
    Anyway, he did well against Balkman when they played each other in the PBA when Japeth was still with Global Port and Balkman was still sane.

    This was Aguilar during his UAAP(Philppine NCAA) days:


    This was Aguilar after his US NCAA stint(plagued by injuries):



    So Puerto Rico has no citizenship? You can get any player as long as they have ancestry linked to your country? How could they tell the ancestry when Puerto Rico is almost like US citizen? Im really clueless and curious. Thanks! Puerto Rico is lucky. How could FIBA let them and our pure Filipinos not. Poor Ryan Reyes.
    I know Japeth, its impossible to be a member of IBN and not know about Japeth, I have seen Japeth play more than I have seen Ricky Ledo.

    Parent or grandparent needs to be born on the island. Federation has to prove it to FIBA via Birth Certificates. There are more puertorricans living abroad than in the island, as most of us have family living in the USA, and I dont consider my dad any less puertorrican because he lives abroad and I live in the island. There is too much migration going back and forth to only consider those in the island as puertorricans.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FilWelsh View Post
    Puerto Rico utilizing players of Rican heritage is actually doing Gilas a favor. Since they can't naturalize Americans who else they gonna naturalize? Jorge Bryan Diaz? I think FIBA will approve him as natural-born as one of his parent is a Rican. Also I doubt he will be named in the final 12 it's a long shot considering he will have Ricky Sanchez and Daniel Santiago to compete for.
    exactly
    and it's too much of a process to do so, it's close to imposible to naturalize. And since we are american citizens, puertorricans can represent 2 countries in international competition which pretty much negates top talent to us since they will choose to have a better chance of winning with the USA, like Carmelo Anthony.

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