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Thread: Ersan Ilyasova in the NBA

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    Efes fan Levenspiel's Avatar
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    Default Ersan Ilyasova in the NBA

    Ersan finally got his first minutes in NBA, and already made an assist .

    After this summer's successful performances both in U-21 team and in Japan WBC, it was obvious he would get his chances. Though he is already a "mature" player mentally, I think he has still many deficits. As far as I could see, he limited his offence with long range shots only after that serious injury. He needs to be more versatile to be anything special.

    I wish him all the best luck!

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    Senior Member Nakz's Avatar
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    WOW, 1.14 minutes for Ersan
    But hey I really believe in Ersan from what I saw this summer. He can become something special. Hope he gets some more playing time during the season to show his skills.

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    Ersan 4 points to Sacramento

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    Administrator stuart's Avatar
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    Default Ersan Ilyasova Progresses for the Bucks...

    A medium-sized article on how Ersan Ilyasova has progressed compared to last year, he'll probably see some minutes this year as a small forward with the Milwaukee Bucks, from JSOnline: source

    Big difference: Turkish teenager Ilyasova makes progress
    St. Francis - After being selected early in the second round of the 2005 draft, Ersan Ilyasova did not play in a game with the Milwaukee Bucks last season.

    After not playing a year ago, Ersan Ilyasova could get some minutes at the small forward spot.

    Got something to get off Got something to get off your chest? Voice your opinion and interact with other fans in our free Bucks Forum. Go to Forum

    But instant impact was not expected from the Turkish teenager.

    He had so many things to learn, including the style of play in the National Basketball Association and different rules than he was accustomed to in Europe.

    And there was the matter of the language, too. Ilyasova spoke very little English, which made it difficult to communicate with his teammates and coaches.

    Take a look at Ilyasova - the 36th overall pick - one year later, and the difference is dramatic. He has put 20 to 25 pounds on his 6-foot-9 frame, weighing in around 230 pounds.

    He seems more comfortable with his teammates. And he is speaking English with greater confidence, thanks to tutoring he received throughout last year, both when he was in Milwaukee and during his stint with the Tulsa 66ers of the NBA Development League.

    "From a year ago today he has made great strides in his physical strength and his confidence, his understanding of the NBA game and his understanding of the English language," Bucks coach Terry Stotts said.

    Ilyasova, at age 19, should get his long anticipated chance to play in an NBA regular season game within a few weeks. Injuries to center Andrew Bogut and small forward Bobby Simmons have left the Bucks thin in the frontcourt, and Ilyasova could be used in a reserve role at either power forward or small forward.

    How much he plays will be determined by his effectiveness and his ability to withstand the punishing nature of the NBA game. Bucks strength and conditioning coach Tim Wilson put Ilyasova on a rigorous program that the young player has followed for the past year.

    And Ilyasova benefited greatly from playing for two national teams during the past summer - the Turkish Under-20 team and the Turkish national team, which placed sixth in the World Championships in Japan. He averaged 9.6 points and 3.9 rebounds while helping Turkey to its best ever finish in the World Championships.

    "I needed game time," Ilyasova said. "I didn't play six months because of my (ankle) injury."

    Ilyasova even got bragging rights over Bogut when Turkey defeated Australia in group play during the World Championships.

    "He was more aggressive to shoot the basketball," said Bucks general manager Larry Harris, who traveled to watch both Bogut and Ilyasova in Japan. "Sometimes when you're one of the youngest players on the team, you're looking more to pass and fit in. As the games went on, they found him to be a person who could make open shots."

    Harris passed on several U.S. collegians, including Ryan Gomes of Providence, when the Bucks chose Ilyasova in the 2005 draft. Gomes went on to have a standout rookie season with the Boston Celtics.

    But Ilyasova had been projected as a first-round pick and slipped in the draft, in part due to the serious ankle injury that hampered his progress when he joined the Bucks last fall.

    "He's only 19 years old, and I think sometimes people want him to be 29," Harris said.

    The Bucks continue their exhibition schedule with a game at Houston tonight, and Stotts pointed to the Rockets' lineup to prove a point about Ilyasova.

    "Shane Battier and (former Marquette star) Steve Novak are playing the 4," Stotts said. "There are a lot of perimeter 4 men, and the court is opening up. Depending on the game and the style of play, I don't think there's any question he can play 4."

    And what about the small forward spot?

    "If you have a quick, athletic 3 man, maybe not," Stotts said. "But if you're playing (against) a bigger lineup, his versatility will allow him to do different things when he's in the game."

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    Senior Member Juan Carlos Nadal's Avatar
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    A bit off-topic but I just saw this:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ersan_Ilyasova

    Born in Eskisehir, Turkey? Since when? Last time I checked he was born in Uzbekistan. But this should not surprise me as I once saw Mirsad's birthplace to be listed as "Istanbul" at Efes' website (when he played for them).

    In any case, it seems that slowly but surely he is getting playing time. With time he will become part of the Bucks' rotation no doubt.
    The Euroleague Organization and Mr Bertomeu are like the Bulgarian Government: corrupt, partially stupid, and a huge underestimator of people's intelligence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Juan Carlos Nadal
    A bit off-topic but I just saw this:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ersan_Ilyasova

    Born in Eskisehir, Turkey? Since when? Last time I checked he was born in Uzbekistan. But this should not surprise me as I once saw Mirsad's birthplace to be listed as "Istanbul" at Efes' website (when he played for them).

    In any case, it seems that slowly but surely he is getting playing time. With time he will become part of the Bucks' rotation no doubt.
    I am not against recruting one or two assimilated players for the basketball national team, but in the last years we seem to be exaggerating this practice. Moreover, Ersan Ilyasova seems to have been presented with a fait accompli when he was asked to play for the Turkish national team and if he had a choice, would rather play for Uzbekistan. My personal observation. I've got no evidence to back it up. Kuqo and Türkcan/Jahovic, on the other hand asked to play in the national team themselves.

    On a different note, as Turkey is more or less a melting-pot of Balkanian and Caucasian emigres as well as local inhabitants of Anatolia and of course Turkic people, we have a considerable number of players with mixed ethnic origin. One of Turkoglu's parents is from Novi Pazar, Serbia. Okur is half Crimean Tartar, half-Bosniak, Besok-Montenegrin Muslim, Erdenay and Aytek Gurkan-Crimean Tartar, Onan-Arab, Ufuk Sarica, Semih Erden, Can Ozcan, Hakan Koseoglu-Bosnian to name just a few.
    Last edited by critter out on a walk; 11-05-2006 at 10:43 PM.

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    Efes fan Levenspiel's Avatar
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    Thanks for the article, Stuart.

    Ersan seems to have impressed his coach before the season started, but I think he needs to improve his versality to be able to succeed in the NBA. I don't know if that's because of his serious injury and consequent loss of athleticism, but now he seems to rely too much on his shooting, which he performs always after a dribbling fake without even jumping . I'm worried about this one-sidedness, otherwise he already showed us he has a really strong bball mentality.

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    Banned turkishpower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by critter out on a walk
    On a different note, as Turkey is more or less a melting-pot of Balkanian and Caucasian emigres as well as local inhabitants of Anatolia and of course Turkic people, we have a considerable number of players with mixed ethnic origin. One of Turkoglu's parents is from Novi Pazar, Serbia. Okur is half Crimean Tartar, half-Bosniak, Besok-Montenegrin Muslim, Erdenay and Aytek Gurkan-Crimean Tartar, Onan-Arab, Ufuk Sarica, Semih Erden, Can Ozcan, Hakan Koseoglu-Bosnian to name just a few.

    I don't know why you gave those examples man. I mean, why the hell you are looking at the origins of each player? Of course, nobody is 100% Turk, and they might have ancestors from all around the world. Even I have ancestors of Turkish-Kurdish-Armenian origins. That doesn't make me feel like going and living in Armenia.(or playing for Armenian NT if I were to be a basketball player) I was born in Turkey, just like Turkoglu, Okur, Besok, etc...
    Except Ilyasova and Kuqo, the rest of the players you mentioned are definitely Turkish, whether their parents are Bosniak origin, Serbian, Tatar whatever... If you dig the origins of people in Turkey, most of them will be either Tatar, Bosniak, Macedonian, Greek, Arab, Kurdish.

    BTW, what do you mean Okur is half Tatar, half Bosniak? His parents were born in Turkey, he was born in Turkey. How the hell you can call a person Bosniak or Tatar just because maybe his grand grand fathers are from those places.
    Okur = full Turkish wherever his grand grand fathers are from. (born in Turkey)
    Turkoglu = full Turkish(born in Turkey)
    Besok= full Turkish(born in Izmir, Turkey)


    except the two guys who were born outside Turkey, Kuqo and Ilyasova, all the rest we can say are Turkish.
    Turkcan is an exception though, even though he was born in Novi Pazar and he is actually a muslim Bosniak having Turkish ancestors.

    No need to dig the origins this much. I'm pretty sure all NT's have players of mixed origins...

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    Efes fan Levenspiel's Avatar
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    Calm down Turkishpower, why does it bother you to know some players' origins? The situation is not much different in the street. Yes, we are Turkish citizens (and Turks in that sense), but many of us have various ethnic backgrounds, too. No one should feel like disguising his/her origins. On the contrary, it's a great thing we have, don't you think?
    Last edited by Levenspiel; 11-06-2006 at 03:14 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by turkishpower
    I don't know why you gave those examples man. I mean, why the hell you are looking at the origins of each player? Of course, nobody is 100% Turk, and they might have ancestors from all around the world. Even I have ancestors of Turkish-Kurdish-Armenian origins. That doesn't make me feel like going and living in Armenia.(or playing for Armenian NT if I were to be a basketball player) I was born in Turkey, just like Turkoglu, Okur, Besok, etc...
    Except Ilyasova and Kuqo, the rest of the players you mentioned are definitely Turkish, whether their parents are Bosniak origin, Serbian, Tatar whatever... If you dig the origins of people in Turkey, most of them will be either Tatar, Bosniak, Macedonian, Greek, Arab, Kurdish.

    BTW, what do you mean Okur is half Tatar, half Bosniak? His parents were born in Turkey, he was born in Turkey. How the hell you can call a person Bosniak or Tatar just because maybe his grand grand fathers are from those places.
    Okur = full Turkish wherever his grand grand fathers are from. (born in Turkey)
    Turkoglu = full Turkish(born in Turkey)
    Besok= full Turkish(born in Izmir, Turkey)


    except the two guys who were born outside Turkey, Kuqo and Ilyasova, all the rest we can say are Turkish.
    Turkcan is an exception though, even though he was born in Novi Pazar and he is actually a muslim Bosniak having Turkish ancestors.

    No need to dig the origins this much. I'm pretty sure all NT's have players of mixed origins...
    Because, every now and then, some people like to claim that we ''stole'' Besok, Turkoglu etc. from the Bosnians on the grounds that these players have Bosniak roots and use that as a pretext to belittle the effort of our basketball national team. I do know that they and their parents and their grand parents were born in Turkey and are as much Turkish as you and me. I myself am a product of a marriage between a Balkanian emigre and a Caucasian emigre and feel 100% Turkish, no less. Just like Turkoglu, Besok, Onan and all the others do.

    p.s.You are right in that I should have mentioned there my last three sentences in this post.
    Last edited by critter out on a walk; 11-06-2006 at 03:51 PM.

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    Banned turkishpower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by critter out on a walk
    Because, every now and then, some people like to claim that we ''stole'' Besok, Turkoglu etc. from the Bosnians on the grounds that these players have Bosniak roots and use that as a pretext to belittle the effort of our basketball national team. I do know that they and their parents and their grand parents were born in Turkey and are as much Turkish as you and me. I myself am a product of a marriage between a Balkanian emigre and a Caucasian emigre and feel 100% Turkish, no less. Just like Turkoglu, Besok, Onan and all the others do.

    p.s.You are right in that I should have mentioned there my last three sentences in this post.

    yeah man, I understand what you mean. Foreigners are ----- (no masking. Other suitable words may be used) according to them no one is Turkish. They find some race for every our player
    Last edited by Juan Carlos Nadal; 11-06-2006 at 06:53 PM.

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    Senior Member Buducnost PG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by critter out on a walk
    I am not against recruting one or two assimilated players for the basketball national team, but in the last years we seem to be exaggerating this practice. Moreover, Ersan Ilyasova seems to have been presented with a fait accompli when he was asked to play for the Turkish national team and if he had a choice, would rather play for Uzbekistan. My personal observation. I've got no evidence to back it up. Kuqo and Türkcan/Jahovic, on the other hand asked to play in the national team themselves.

    On a different note, as Turkey is more or less a melting-pot of Balkanian and Caucasian emigres as well as local inhabitants of Anatolia and of course Turkic people, we have a considerable number of players with mixed ethnic origin. One of Turkoglu's parents is from Novi Pazar, Serbia. Okur is half Crimean Tartar, half-Bosniak, Besok-Montenegrin Muslim, Erdenay and Aytek Gurkan-Crimean Tartar, Onan-Arab, Ufuk Sarica, Semih Erden, Can Ozcan, Hakan Koseoglu-Bosnian to name just a few.
    Nice post. As you said a lot of people in Turkey have another backround but they feel like Turks. But they also know where they did come from. Turkoglou´s parents are both from Serbia (Part Sandzak) as i know. They went to Turkey around 1960. A lot of muslims (bosjnaks, serbian-muslims) went to Turkey after the Ottoman Empire fall down. But these people from we can call it Ex-Yugoslavia were not turks and also weren´t speaking turkish. During the first and second world war also a lot of muslims from Ex-Yugoslavia went to Turkey because serbians Cetniks and croatians Ustasas were killing a lot of muslims during this time. And that only because of the religion. The difference between a Serb, Croat and Bosjnak is the Religon nothing other. Their are people which have the same name for example Martinovic and the one is Croat, the other Serb and the other one Bosnian.

    The most people with a backround from Bosnia+Sandzak in turkey lives in Istanbul( i have hered there is a part in istanbul called Yeni Bosna) and Izmir. Most of some are also able to speak bosnian/serbian call it as you want. Here in Germany are a lot of turks and i have some good turkish friends. The men where i buy my Döner grow up in an part of Istanbul were are living people with a backround from Bosnia+Sandzak an he said that they are speaking bosnian when they talk to each other. He also speaks a little bit bosnian. He was living there until he was 25. I don´t know how it is with Besok but Turkoglou is speaking perfect serbian/bosnian. When Mirsad was young he was on a tryout by Red Star Belgrade and they wanted to keep him. But that was in the begining of the 90´s were also was the Balkan war and a difficult time for muslims so he decided to leave Serbia and went to Turkey. His parents are still living in Novi Pazar and his sister is the girlfried from Mustafa Sandal as i know.

    When Semih Erden singed for Partizan there was an article in an montenegrin newspaper that his parents are from Montenegros part of Sandzak.

    I hope turkishpower will not be angry again. It is absolutly ok that Turkogolu, Besok and so on play for Turkey, because that is their home and they grow up there(The parents of them was also given a chance to live and work in Turkey. Everyting could have happend if they have stayed in Serbia, Bosnia and so on). But all they have not forget were are they from. It is the same with some turkish, serbian or croatian foodball players in U16-U20 in Germany. But i don´t like if coutries bring in players from aboard like Bosnia Domercant to play for them. Croatia did it also with Damir Mulaomerovic. Mirsad hate Mulaomerovic so far as i know.

    There are also some other players from the Sandzak/Raska Oblast Region which are serbs or montenegrins like

    Vlade Divac - Prijepolje
    Predrag Drobnjak (Partizan), Dusko Ivanovic(Barcelona), Nikola Pekovic(Partizan), Nebojsa Bogavac(Le Mans)- Bijelo Polje
    Zarko Paspalji - Pljevlja
    Duro Ostojic (now in Besiktas) - Berane

    I am also from this region (montenegros Part of Sandzak/Raska Oblast) so i know what i am talking about.

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    Efes fan Levenspiel's Avatar
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    That's a very informative post, Buducnost PG, thanks for that . All the things written here should give an idea about the composition of Turkey.

    Two hours later, I'll be watching Chicago-Milwaukee game. That's the first time we'll see Ersan in NBA, and I hope he's informed about this .

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    Banned turkishpower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buducnost PG
    I hope turkishpower will not be angry again.

    who said I'm angry?


    BTW, the important question is:

    I do know Hedo's parents came from Yugoslavia. But, important questions are:
    1) Are they actually Turkish that used to live in Yugoslavia before? And then eventually decided to move to Turkey.
    2) Are they muslims? (Hedo is muslim right?)
    3) What about Mirsad and his parents?

    I think they are all Turkish who lived there(For Mirsad's parents: Novi Pazar, for Hedo: Sandzak) even after the fall of Ottoman because that's where their ancestors lived...

    Don't forget, even though Ottoman fell aroud 1920's, I'm sure there are still lots of Turkish people are left in eastern europe mainly because they didn't want to leave the place they were born in...

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    Banned turkishpower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sariss
    Calm down Turkishpower, why does it bother you to know some players' origins? The situation is not much different in the street. Yes, we are Turkish citizens (and Turks in that sense), but many of us have various ethnic backgrounds, too. No one should feel like disguising his/her origins. On the contrary, it's a great thing we have, don't you think?

    I think the same there is lots of people in Turkey having different ethnic backgrounds. That's not something to be ashamed of. But when it comes to foreigners, they don't understand it. They try to own our players (Turkcan, Turkoglu etc...) because their ethnic background is from Bosnia, Serbia etc...

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    Pretty interesting subject, but I agree with Turkishpower that you shouldn't make a big fuss about this if it comes to our player. Because it's just the way Turkey is, a place which is a melting pot of various ethnic backgrounds. So using "oh they aren't really Turkish anyway" argument is pretty silly in this regard, because quite frankly how many 100% Turks are there nowadays? Not that many if at all, aren't we supposedly originated from Mongolia or something and on top of that we had an empire which lasted 600 years and spread across many countries with many ethnics. There have bee4n a lot of transformation regarding the Turkic race over the years.

    To stay on topic, Ersan scored 4 points last game against the Bulls. He still is playing garbage minutes, but that was expected. He needs to be patient, I think he will get his chances this year. He will be playing the Rockets tonight that means you can watch it live over Sopcast on some Chinese channel.
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    Last edited by Spike; 04-15-2011 at 12:54 PM.

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    Senior Member Juan Carlos Nadal's Avatar
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    There is no doubt that Turkey is a melting pot of various ethnic groups. Besides what country isn't, nowadays?

    However a distinction has to be made with regard to players that were born in Turkey but have a variable ethnic background (e.g Okur, Hedo etc), and the imported players that became turks in the process (Jahovic, Parsic, Elyasova). Not that it matters, but do not mix one with the other, as they are substantially different.

    The Euroleague Organization and Mr Bertomeu are like the Bulgarian Government: corrupt, partially stupid, and a huge underestimator of people's intelligence.

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    Senior Member Buducnost PG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by turkishpower
    who said I'm angry?


    BTW, the important question is:

    I do know Hedo's parents came from Yugoslavia. But, important questions are:
    1) Are they actually Turkish that used to live in Yugoslavia before? And then eventually decided to move to Turkey.
    2) Are they muslims? (Hedo is muslim right?)
    3) What about Mirsad and his parents?

    I think they are all Turkish who lived there(For Mirsad's parents: Novi Pazar, for Hedo: Sandzak) even after the fall of Ottoman because that's where their ancestors lived...

    Don't forget, even though Ottoman fell aroud 1920's, I'm sure there are still lots of Turkish people are left in eastern europe mainly because they didn't want to leave the place they were born in...
    1: In Bosnia and Sandzak nobody of the muslims declare them as turks.The most declare them as bosjnaks and also Turkoglous parents are bosjnaks. If they were turks why Turkoglou speaks such a good serbian?
    2. Yes they are muslims the same as Turkcans parents are muslims.
    3. With Mirsad it is the same thing as with Hedo only that he was born in Serbia.

    But there were also turks from Turkey which setteld to the european part of the Ottoman empire. But that was more in the south (Fyrom and Bulgaria). In Fyrom still life around 4% turks and in Bulgaria i think around 10. Oktay Mahmuti is turk from Fyrom.

    Don't forget, even though Ottoman fell aroud 1920's, I'm sure there are still lots of Turkish people are left in eastern europe mainly because they didn't want to leave the place they were born in...
    During world war they have do decide to go or to stay. But all of them were in danger. The other people from that countries were angry on the muslims because they cooperate with the Ottomans´s and have more rights in that time and become muslims. All of them were in danger but some decieded to stay. Why i don´t know.

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    Efes fan Levenspiel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juan Carlos Nadal
    However a distinction has to be made with regard to players that were born in Turkey but have a variable ethnic background (e.g Okur, Hedo etc), and the imported players that became turks in the process (Jahovic, Parsic, Elyasova). Not that it matters, but do not mix one with the other, as they are substantially different.

    You're right, JCN. That distinction should be made. But honestly, it does not make me feel as if those players were any less Turks. I know they are not, I'm talking about the feeling. The acceptance of these players is easier not only since they all came at younger ages, but also because there are already many people around us with Albanian, Bosnian, Serbian, Georgian, etc. roots. The same would not be valid if an American or, let's say, Spanish citizen was neutralized (at the age of 20 or more). However, it becomes irritating if the number of imports increases, like critter out in a walk mentioned.

    And when you see the devotion Türkcan and Kuqo brought to the game in NT matches, you cannot help but gotta love them . (Yes, knowing that both are not Turks originally). And Ersan is a little bit different, because he's Uzbek, a very close relative of us. (Yes, he's still an import ).
    Last edited by Levenspiel; 11-08-2006 at 05:11 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Juan Carlos Nadal

    However a distinction has to be made with regard to players that were born in Turkey but have a variable ethnic background (e.g Okur, Hedo etc), and the imported players that became turks in the process (Jahovic, Parsic, Elyasova). Not that it matters, but do not mix one with the other, as they are substantially different.

    You are right. I don't think I adequately clarified that point. Like I said, I am not against one or perhaps two naturalized players in the national team, but I personally think that we have been resorting to that practice rather excessively in the last years. Right now, there is only Kuqo and Ilyasova. In a few years, we will have 4-5 more naturalized players that are national team material. Not mid-level players like Zaza Endenladze, Nedim Dal etc. Not that I would view such players any differently from those players who were born in Turkey so long as the will to play for the Turkish national team comes from a desire on their part and so long as they are not forced(in a way) to play for Turkey. It is just that it'd be unfair to the teams that we are competing with and which don't resort to such measures. And to those countries where those players originate from.


    p.s. Anyway, I apologize to the moderators for drifting off-topic again. I have a big mouth that I have difficulty controlling.
    Last edited by critter out on a walk; 11-09-2006 at 06:09 PM.

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