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Thread: Russia NT

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvblair
    Sasha Kaun is a great player who could easily be in the NBA. I guess he wants that 3 year contract with CSKA though. I guess he was born in Russia, but when did he move to the US?
    Let,s wait about his greatness. It,s too early. We,ll see him in Olympics Games and euroleague,and only after that we,ll probably trying to say that Sasha Kaun it,s something more than average player. Anyway,i wish him the best and i hope he,ll be our secret weapon in one month!

  2. #42
    Senior Member Migelitas's Avatar
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    According to Sports.ru, starting five member of russian NT Viktor Khryapa may miss Olympics due to Achilles injury, which he got in collision with Nikita Shabalkin.
    http://www.sports.ru/basketball/5150929.html

  3. #43
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    How you people see the Russian NT for the olympics?

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by cardenales
    How you people see the Russian NT for the olympics?
    Seems like Khryapa is going to play so they'll have the same roster. Russia was a big surprise in Eurobasket 2007. Perfect team play, everyone knew his place, great play by Kirilenko, Khryapa, Holden, Morgunov, Pashutin. I'm not sure Khryapa will manage to show the same quality while looking at his performances in CSKA. Still, if they'll manage to show the same quality team play, they can beat anybody in one particular game. And yes, i have no doubt Spain and Lithuania were stronger teams in Eurobasket and, imho, they'll prove that in Olympics.
    Last edited by Straight forward; 07-07-2008 at 05:40 PM.
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  5. #45
    Senior Member damelo's Avatar
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    Khryapa used to do that good in NT, while not playing in the NBA. I think in 2005 he did pretty well too. So, I hope he'll do as well as in 2007 this summer.
    It's a bird? It's a plane? No, it's Rudy!

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Straight forward
    Seems like Khryapa is going to play so they'll have the same roster. Russia was a big surprise in Eurobasket 2007. Perfect team play, everyone knew his place, great play by Kirilenko, Khryapa, Holden, Morgunov, Pashutin. I'm not sure Khryapa will manage to show the same quality while looking at his performances in CSKA. Still, if they'll manage to show the same quality team play, they can beat anybody in one particular game. And yes, i have no doubt Spain and Lithuania were stronger teams in Eurobasket and, imho, they'll prove that in Olympics.
    We,ll see in Olimpics,who what can prove it. As for Russia,we don,t afraid to lose you,because we surely dark horse in Olimpic Games,but i can,t say the same about Lithuania.If you,ll lose in the main stage (quarter-final )in would be real catastrophe for Lithuania.
    P.s. Our adequate understanding of our fettle is Russian strength.

  7. #47
    Senior Member Basket_'s Avatar
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    Now it seems that Khryapa probably won't play Olympics, because of injury.
    http://www.eurobasket.lt/lt/naujieno...279;lto-nevyks

  8. #48
    Senior Member Federoy's Avatar
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    Default Russia dominates Portugal; sets up Eurobasket rematch


  9. #49
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    Russia team

    Holden
    Pashutin
    Bykov
    Samoylenko
    Fridzon
    Keyru
    Kirilenko
    Monya
    Voronsevich
    Morgunov
    Savrasenko
    Kaun

    Big surprise,Ponkrashov left out.
    According to Blatt Khryapa can make the team at the last minute,he will fly to Beijing.

  10. #50
    Senior Member L8DBACK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kleber
    Russia team

    Holden
    Pashutin
    Bykov
    Samoylenko
    Fridzon
    Keyru
    Kirilenko
    Monya
    Voronsevich
    Morgunov
    Savrasenko
    Kaun

    Big surprise,Ponkrashov left out.
    According to Blatt Khryapa can make the team at the last minute,he will fly to Beijing.
    The USA vs Russia preparation game will be interesting tonight. Can't wait!

  11. #51
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    i hate you all who have the ability to watch this. i'll be stuck at work....
    "A nationality that easily feels wronged is an insecure one, and one that will be difficult to progress."-Anonymous

  12. #52
    Moderator Mindozas's Avatar
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    So the last player who was left out is S.Kaun, also that means that V.Khryapa is going to Beijing. As D.Blatt said, Khryapa might be ready to play in Olympics from the start. Still, he'll miss Russia's last preparation game vs China on Wednesday, which will be played behind closed doors


  13. #53
    Senior Member Basket_'s Avatar
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    According to this, Blatt said, that Holden won't play in Russian NT anymore.

  14. #54
    Senior Member auris1's Avatar
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    What he meant was that it is the end of the cycle for the team .And one half of current team has no future .
    And let that be a lesson to you all. Nobody beats Zalgiris 17 times in a row.

  15. #55
    Administrator rikhardur's Avatar
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    Will Blatt keep at the helm?
    Die Liebe wird eine Krankheit, wenn man sie als eine Heilung sieht
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  16. #56
    Administrator mvblair's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rikhardur
    Will Blatt keep at the helm?
    He should not. He was absolutely disappointing. Poor, poor, poor offense.


    Matt's Uninformed Comments on the Russian 2008 Campaign

    • Looking back to 2007, maybe Russia was just lucky. At the time, a lot of people said “no, they’re a true team.” What happened to that team?
    • Kirilenko was the same Kirilenko that NBA get to see every week. Good stuff.
    • JR Holden was great. Wonderful as usual.
    • Besides Holden and Kirilenko, Russia was pretty pathetic.
    • Don’t blame the players, blame the coach. Blatt is supposed to be one of the best coaches on the planet, but the only team he could beat was Iran? Yes, the fourth quarter run against Lithuania was very good. But Blatt was out-coached and out-played by Australia, Argentina, and Croatia. Pathetic.
    "I really like the attitudes of eagles. They never give up. When they grab a fish or something else, they never let it go. It doesn't matter. In a book, they write they find a skeleton of [an] eagle and there is no fish. It means that the fish beat him and killed him, but he didn't let go." -- Donatas Motiejunas

  17. #57
    Administrator rikhardur's Avatar
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    Default Russia NT 2009

    More Pressure On Russia After Madrid Glory


    // 16 November 2008
    Russia will enter EuroBasket 2009 as defending champions and with a very tough task of holding on to the crown.

    The no-expectations trip to Madrid last year, at least by those outside the Russian camp, will be replaced with an entirely different type of journey to Poland next summer.


    David Blatt's team, which includes CSKA Moscow stars JR Holden and Victor Khryapa, and EuroBasket 2007 MVP Andrei Kirilenko of the Utah Jazz, will be under immense pressure to retain the gold medal.

    At the recent EuroBasket draw held in Warsaw, Russia discovered they would play in Group B in Gdansk with Latvia, Germany and the team to join last, from the Additional Qualifying Round.

    Last year, Russia were also drawn with the last team to join, so that might bring good karma for the gold holders in the upcoming campaign as well.

    "Right now, we can't see a complete picture of our group because one of the opponents that we'll face will qualify though an additional tournament," Blatt said on the official website of Dynamo Moscow - the club side he coaches in Russia's Superleague.

    "That means, we're in a very difficult situation, because we won't know who we are going to face so we can't make a plan of preparation beforehand.

    "Potentially, if it's Italy or France, the team from the qualifying tournament will become the strongest opponent for us, and that will make our group, which is already strong, even stronger."


    If not France or Italy, the team that reaches Poland could be Bosnia and Herzegovina, Portugal, Belgium or Finland.

    Blatt also shared his thoughts about the teams that are already set to play him in Group B.

    "It goes without saying that Dirk Nowitzki is one of the best players in the world, in my opinion," he said.

    "As far as I know, he has yet to make a decision whether he will he play. But I'm sure that even without him Germany team has a great potential."


    First up for Russia, who won the gold last year with an upset of Spain in Madrid, will be Latvia and their incredibly talented center Andris Biedrins.

    The Baltic country have a point to prove after slipping up in their last group game in Seville against Portugal at EuroBasket 2007 and missing out on advancing to the Qualifying Round for the Quarte-Finals.

    "Latvia is a team that we know very well," Blatt said. "We know the players and the coaches. It is a strong opponent for us, and we'll be preparing a lot before the game against Latvia."

    Russia will be looking for another big tournament from Kirilenko.

    "Latvia has always been a hard nut to crack," Kirilenko said to Moscow's Sport-Express newspaper.

    "It's tough to play against Germany, not only because they have Nowitzki, but because they play a smooth, running team game."


    Kirilenko had the honor of serving as his country's flagbearer this summer at the Olympics.

    Unfortunately for him, that proved to be the highlight for the basketball team as they failed to advance to the last eight in Beijing.

    Just as nearly everyone else does, Kirilenko thinks Italy or France will qualify as the 16th team and he knows the one he'd prefer to face.

    "If I had to choose between Italy and France, then I'd prefer Italy," he said. "Their style suits us better."

    Maybe there's another reason for Russia wanting to avoid France.

    Should Tony Parker and Les Bleus claim the last spot, they would no doubt be on a revenge mission after falling to Russia in the quarter-finals at EuroBasket 2007.

    Kirilenko is ready for his group opponents, but he knows that Russia won't sneak up on any team.

    "It's always harder to defend a championship than to win it," he said.

    At least Russian fans will know this.

    No team will find it easy to snatch the title from their team.
    http://www.fibaeurope.com/coid_znRYS...leMode_on.html
    Die Liebe wird eine Krankheit, wenn man sie als eine Heilung sieht
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  18. #58
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    I don,t like our situation with russian players in Superleague. They have awful lack of time on the court. Situation with our main young talents such Sasha Kaun and especially Alexei Shved simply enrages me. If they aren,t good enough to play now in CSKA, then it,s needed to farm them out in other team, because in their age to be without practice, it,s crime,real crime. For example, Victor Claver and Martynas Gecevicius (both of them 20 years old as well) have enough practice in their clubs, while Shved which at least doesn,t yield to them on talent smokes a bamboo on a bench...

  19. #59
    Administrator rikhardur's Avatar
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    Nilsen: Holden Unsure Of Russia Future

    Picture the scenario, you get the chance to have a conversation with Neil Armstrong and beforehand you are tormented by the devilish thought that he might just be completely sick of constantly talking about that defining moment.

    I mean how long do you seriously think you could wait before eventually giving in to temptation and just blurting out a question about walking on the moon like everyone else who probably meets him?

    With that in mind, you can only imagine my dilemma when I grabbed the chance to interview EuroBasket gold medallist and star of the Russia National Team Jon Robert Holden recently.

    I tried desperately to suppress any talk of ‘that basket' but in truth failed miserably. Sometimes it is just easier to accept that some people become synonymous with certain events or things in their life.

    In the case of Holden of course it is an entire EuroBasket tournament. Indeed go to Spain and you might just find that in having denied Gasol and Co their first EuroBasket gold medal with 'that basket', the Spanish vocabulary had suddenly found a new swear word.

    If nothing else, when mentioning ‘Holden' in Iberia, you might just get a disappointed shake of the head since Spanish eyes definitely weren't smiling back in the summer of 2007.

    While the tears rained down in Spain, Holden reigned supreme. For a little further Eastwards, Russian ball fans celebrated wildly as the already decorated and well respected CSKA Moscow star was catapulted into the realms of basketball folklore.

    Two years later and another EuroBasket is now looming but amazingly Holden is by no means certain to play a part - something that would be a great shame considering his exciting performances in a Russia vest during recent years.

    Coach Blatt could yet hand the naturalised spot to the likes of Travis Hansen, someone he knows well from his club team Dynamo Moscow, while Holden himself might influence the decision by making himself unavailable anyway.

    Either way, one thing is for certain. No matter how hard you might try, talking about EuroBasket 2007 in Spain is impossible without mentioning Jon Robert Holden and vice-versa - as I found out to my shame when I caught up with him.

    FIBA Europe: Hi JR, you head for Poland later this year as holders of that gold medal. Do you think this puts more or less pressure on you to perform individually and as a team?

    J.R. Holden: Honestly, I don't know if I will play this summer or not. I have played four years in a row and I am looking forward to possibly taking this summer off and spending more time with my daughter. However, it wouldn't be any pressure on us at all. We know it takes hard work and a little luck to win a Gold medal and we are prepared to do the hard work. As for me individually, I love to compete. There is no pressure playing basketball. Where I'm from, pressure is not having a job and your unsure of how your going to feed your family, pressure is not knowing if you can pay your bills to keep a roof over your head. Basketball, its just a game that I love to play, its no pressure at all.

    FIBA Europe: At National Team level, what do you feel are the essential ingredients to success and winning medals and do you think there were any major or minor differences between reaching success in club and country basketball?

    J.R. Holden: Essential ingredients to winning I think is team chemistry, defense and belief that you can compete and win every game. The difference between club and country basketball is club basketball you get an entire season to improve and grow as a team. Country basketball you only get a month, maybe 2 to gel as a team and compete for a medal. Country basketball has a different feel. You have all these elite players coming back from the NBA and their club teams competing for their country is amazing. Its so heartfelt and passionate. Its something I am glad I was given the opportunity to experience.

    FIBA Europe: When it comes to EuroBasket you must get a real kick that your name is always the first on everybodys lips when they talk about that tournament in 2007 in Spain. In fact your contribution is what the entire tournament will always be remembered for. While we know you always give due respect to your team-mates, do you still think about it with a smile on your face or does that memory fade away?

    J.R. Holden: Of course that is a very fond memory that I have. I will always treasure that tournament and what we were able to accomplish. We shocked the world! Its nice to be remembered. One day when I am done playing, I will look back and cherish all the special moments I had playing overseas. This one is definitely at the top of the list.

    FIBA Europe: How much at that very top level in those medal winning situations with the game on the line is just about your instinct and how much is down to quick thinking in that moment?

    J.R. Holden: I think basketball is a very instinctual game. However, in preparing to be the best player you can be, you have to be sharp mentally. When I prepare/work-out to get ready before the seasons, I do a lot of repetitive drills and other things so that when a certain situation happens in a game I have the instinct and the sharp mind to make the right move for me without hesitation. That is very important. You need both instinct and smart thinking to make good plays in crucial moments of a game.

    FIBA Europe: People have spoken about this Russian National team having to evolve like any other but what do you think is the medium to long term future of the team beyond Poland this year? Also, have you got a date in your mind when you think you might hang up the sneakers - London
    2012 Olympics would be nice!


    J.R. Holden: Ha ha. I will probably hang up my sneakers before London 2012. I will probably play one or two more years with a club team and then I will probably hang up my dancing shoes :-). As for long-term success, I really think if Russia can keep a good core of 5-8 players together for the next 3 or 4 years that would be great. Most teams have players that have spent years and years playing together with their National Teams. I think that type of chemistry and camaraderie is priceless.

    In Part 2 of our interview next week, JR reflects on the journey from College ball as a teenager to EuroBasket glory and tells us what it takes for rising stars to reach the top of their game.
    http://www.fibaeurope.com/coid_ut1AB...frontpage.html
    Die Liebe wird eine Krankheit, wenn man sie als eine Heilung sieht
    Artificial Nature

  20. #60
    Administrator rikhardur's Avatar
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    Nilsen: More With JR Holden

    When it comes to watching and learning, the current crop of young players could do a lot worse than to sit down with a few game tapes of EuroBasket 2007 star JR Holden in action - whether it is for CSKA Moscow in Euroleague or for Russia on the International stage.

    As with most players and even those at the top, Holden is far from flawless but there are some particularly striking dimensions to his repertoire which don't necessarily accompany every other player who has the ability.

    Watch him closely and it becomes immediately apparent that as well as having talent and the all important feel for the game, he also has some pretty vital additional ingredients.

    Hard work, application and a fearless approach to making decisions and taking tough shots when required are characteristics that go a long way to explaining his stellar status within the European game.

    That of course is also the reason why we were discussing ‘that shot' from EuroBasket 2007 in the first part of the interview. For things of such magnitude rarely happen merely because of talent - they usually require a not so small dose of those extra factors.

    Some observers have criticised Holden in the past for perhaps pushing his playmaker role to the limit by doing too much himself but you wont hear anyone in his adopted country complaining too much - or the coaches who have given him the scope to win countless games.

    One look at his personal list of achievements and the fact he is due to play in yet another Euroleague Final Four with CSKA in just over a fortnight speaks volumes.
    On the International stage, playing as a naturalised player for Russia has never looked a problem but only a privilege for Holden and indeed it is a role that he has clearly taken to his heart - even in times of struggle.

    He nailed his colours firmly to the mast with an impressive personal effort during a disappointing Olympic tournament by the reigning European Champions scoring 19 points or more in four of his five outings in Bejiing.

    However with his future at National Team level now hanging in the balance and fans having to reluctantly come to terms with the possibility of him being absent in Poland, it seemed a good time to find out more about his approach and how to survive on the big stage.

    Not only that, but to also reflect on how it all started over a decade ago with a typically brave and shall we say, 'Holdenesque' decision. For after graduation from College, JR was just a few days away from looking for a "real job" before courageously taking the plunge and of course that first pivotal step towards stardom.

    FIBA Europe: As a leader for your club and country and now in that ball park of being a veteran, how do you think you have changed as a player and a person since those days when you ran out in Lewisburg for the Bucknell Bison?

    JR Holden: Wow, as a player and as a person I have become better and smarter. Back then I didn't know how much or what it took to really be a champion. As I got older I realized how important working hard and smart is in becoming a champion. At Bucknell I was innocent and had no clue about the business side of the game/sport. Also, I didn't have a clue that I would be a professional. All I wanted to do was play a game that I love so much. Now I know more about myself, my love for basketball and the business side of the game.

    FIBA Europe: Back in the day you showed you had the guts to make a brave move from college into the unknown of Latvia to try and carve out a pro-career. Was that the best decision you ever made and do you think you are proof that going out of your comfort zone and showing that kind of mental toughness is important?

    JR Holden: I wouldn't say its the best move I ever made but it was definitely very important. It was my step towards where I am today so it was definitely monumental for me. However, I think every decision I made early in my career was very important and significant to where I am today. Yes, I think you have to have a mental toughness in order to play in some countries and at that time Latvia isn't like it is today. You have to believe in yourself and sacrifice some things in order to be successful and this was a part of my sacrifice.

    FIBA Europe: I guess that when you grew up in the States you maybe had posters of your favourite players on your wall? Who were they of and do you ever think about how now, half way across the world, kids in Moscow have your poster on their walls. Quite a journey and turnaround in the situation?

    JR Holden: Well, as a kid, I loved Kenny Anderson, the Fab Five (Jalen Rose big time), and Isaiah Thomas. Those players and many more were all over my wall. Just thinking about a kid having my picture on their wall is a blessing and truly a humble feeling. I am very thankful for everything that I have been blessed to accomplish. Its truly humbling for me, especially coming from where I am from.

    FIBA Europe: You have National team tournaments, Euroleague with CSKA and also the Russian Super league - quite a schedule for any player. A young guy with talent approaches you for your advice. What do you tell him about surviving at the top in all of these big competitions?

    JR Holden: I would say the summer time is very important. You have to work-out in the summer time to become a better player. That time is important for your physical and mental growth and you will need them both to play at the top level. It should be fun as well. The regular season is stressful enough. The summer time should be about you getting better and having some fun with the game.

    FIBA Europe: How do you approach playing in big tournaments like EuroBasket in terms of how close the games come together and how many games you might play in a couple of weeks? Can you take your foot off the gas and contain yourself or is it always flat out and see how the body and mind hold up?

    JR Holden: Honestly, I approach every game and tournament the same. You have to go all out and try to play your best. When you try to cruise or take off, that is how you get beat or get hurt. I just try to focus on that one game no matter how many games we may play in a small amount of time. That is why preparation is so important. You have to be in shape and ready to compete at a high level before the games begin.
    http://www.fibaeurope.com/coid_KRhN9...frontpage.html
    Die Liebe wird eine Krankheit, wenn man sie als eine Heilung sieht
    Artificial Nature

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