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Thread: 2011 Japan NT

  1. #1
    Senior Member CKR13's Avatar
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    Default 2011 Japan NT

    The Japanese Basketball Association (JABBA) has began preparing for the 2011 FIBA Asia Olympic Qualifiers to be held in Wuhan, China later this year.

    The Conditioning Camp will be the initial groundwork of future preparations that are to be determined soon after the JABBA planning committee had laid out a contingent training plan for the National Team.

    Men's Senior Japanese National Team Head coach Thomas Wiseman will supervise the series of conditioning camps as scheduled:

    February 4, 2011 at the Ajinomoto National Training Center

    February 24, 2011 at the Ajinomoto National Training Center

    March 1, 2011 at the Ajinomoto National Training Center

    June 2, 2011 at the Ajinomoto National Training Center

    The Men's National Pool is soon to be named and a number of Collegiate and High School standouts will also be participating and training alongside the senior national team members.

    Ryoma Hashimoto (Aoyama Gakuin University)
    Sasayama Riyuu (Nihon University)
    Ninomiya Yasuhira (Keio University)
    Akira Hisashi (Aoyama Gakuin University)
    Minatoya Yasushi (Aoyama Gakuin University)
    Keisuke Kanamaru Akira (Meiji University)
    Kanou Makoto (Meiji University)
    Takashi Hutoshi (Keio University)
    Tamura Susumu (Meiji University)
    Nakagawa Masao (Aoyama Gakuin University)
    Tsuzi Naoto (Aoyama Gakuin University)
    Ryo Kubota (Waseda University)
    Minoru Hara (Tokai University)
    Makoto Hitoshi Morikawa (Nihon University)
    Miura Youhei (Tokai University)
    Kamada Hiroya (Daito Bunka University)
    Ezima Makoto (Aoyama Gakuin University)
    Hiroshi Takashi Ono (Chuo University)
    Akira Tadashi Uto (Senshu University)
    Akira Takashi Umebayashi (Tokai University)
    Nakashima Shiyouhei (Keio University)
    Nagayoshi Yuu (Aoyama Gakuin University)
    Hiroshi Takashi Tanaka (Tokai University)
    Hisashi Akira Kosaka (Osaka Gakuin University)
    Minagawa Tetsu (Kita Miyako HS)
    Shingo Nomoto Ken (Hokuriku HS)
    Huzita Hiromiti (Fukuoka University Oohori HS)
    Okabe Kenta (Maebashi Hide Iku HS)
    Akira Tasuku Hashimoto (Utsunomiya, Tochigi Technical High School)
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    Senior Member CKR13's Avatar
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    Tokyo Apache point guard Cohey Aoki wants to play for the National Team:

    http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-b...0110301b1.html

    The article is a most interesting one as fans alongside the players on the BJ-League are clamoring that the Japanese Basktball Association (JABBA) should also take in consideration BJ-League players into the National Team where the National Team is composed mainly of JBL players where it is known that the JBL has better local talent over the BJ-League but I believe that there are also exceptional players on the BJ-League though they can be counted with the hand.

    I think the following deserve consideration:

    Masashi Joho - Shooter and can score. Could be back-up to Kawamura.

    Kazuya Hatano - A rebounding forward and could provide defense on the perimeter and weakside trapping defense.

    Jumpei Nakama - Terrific shooter from beyond the arc.

    Masahiro Ohguchi - Another prolific shooting guard.
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    Senior Member kaiziken_pinas's Avatar
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    @CKR : do they have new naturalization candidates? or will the stick with Sakuragi? or will they have a naturalized player???

    is the core the team that played in the Stankovic Cup?

    (I love Japanese Anime but I hate their Bball team ^_^)

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    As far as I know, JABBA has no plans of the moment for a new naturalized candidate as their basketball program focuses more on the youth talent development.

    Regarding of the coming FIBA Asia Olympic Qualifiers, the core could be retained as the pool of players and preparation shall be made public after the JBL Finals.
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    Default Bob Hill comments on the National Team Program

    Tokyo Apache head coach, former NBA head coach Bob Hill offered his views regarding the distinction of internal domestic player development towards the National Team and International Competition.

    "As long as the JBA resists the two leagues coming together, it hurts the development of the Japanese players on the national team and eliminates the development of other players who might be great additions to the national team."
    "Bringing the two leagues together and developing the country's talent would benefit a lot of people. So, in conclusion I think Japan is sabotaging itself in the world of basketball. And the bj-league and the way it's set up is benefiting the Japanese players and their development far more than the JBL."
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    Default Yuta Tabuse's charity, NBA dreams and Dedication to the National Team

    Tabuse Hoping To Give Japan Big Assist
    The floor itself was bouncing. Yuta Tabuse looked up and the roof was shaking, too. To the players inside the Brex Arena Utsunomiya, it felt like the whole gym was being dribbled. And violently so.

    Japan's most famous basketball player was gliding through a light scrimmage on the afternoon before a game when a magnitude 9.0 earthquake slammed the country's northeast region with no mercy. The force was such that, even five hours away from the epicenter, Tabuse and his Link Tochigi Brex teammates felt the need to run for their lives, sprinting out of the building and onto an adjacent street to find that cars were swaying back and forth like everything else.

    In the world of Japanese basketball, work stoppage means something else entirely. Two weeks after the earthquake and the ensuing Pacific tsunami leveled many low-lying areas in northeast Japan and inflicted devastating damage on the Fukushima nuclear power plant, it's a community dealing with a real-life doomsday scenario, as opposed to the prospect of a mere lockout.

    "The aftershocks were a little bit scary, but the radiation [threat throughout Japan] was the real, real big factor why I left," ex-Marquette center Scott Merritt -- who plays with Tabuse for Link Tochigi after playing with Dwyane Wade in college -- told ESPN.com this week after returning to his offseason home in Milwaukee.

    "A lot of people are still scared. Because depending on how the radiation [situation] plays out, it's possible that the worst is still yet to come."

    Two weeks after Japan was struck by its own heartless cousin to Hurricane Katrina, Tabuse and Merritt have no practices to attend because the eight-team Japan Basketball League has canceled the rest of the season. Three teams in the rival 16-team bj-League -- including the Tokyo Apache coached by NBA veteran Bob Hill and featuring American big men Robert Swift and Jeremy Tyler -- have also suspended operations for the season's final two months amid what experts regard as the world's most serious atomic crisis since Chernobyl in the mid-1980s and an estimated $300 billion in damages.

    By now you've undoubtedly seen Kobe Bryant's public-service announcement seeking donations on behalf of the Red Cross, which is a natural cause for Kobe to champion given that his father, Joe "Jellybean" Bryant, was in Japan the time of the earthquake and coached the Apache before Hill did. A handful of Bryant's big-name peers -- including Lakers teammate Pau Gasol, Portland's LaMarcus Aldridge, Atlanta's Al Horford, Chicago's Derrick Rose and Oklahoma City's Russell Westbrook -- have followed up by pledging to donate $1,000 to the Japan relief effort for every point they score in designated games this weekend through Direct Relief International.

    And now Tabuse is back to give the cause its Japanese voice. He took NBA interest in his homeland to unseen levels when he unexpectedly made the Phoenix Suns' roster as Japan's first-ever NBA player in the 2004-05 season and just returned to the States in hopes of using his NBA and Nike connections to raise awareness of Japan's plight. The 5-foot-9, 165-pound point guard, who turned 30 in October, arrived in Los Angeles on Thursday night and hopes to connect with former teammates such as Steve Nash, Amare Stoudemire and Shawn Marion. The plan? Arrange a charity game to raise emergency funds and/or bring NBA players to Japan as soon as possible for youth clinics.

    Tabuse only appeared in four games with the Suns in '04-05, for a whopping total of 17 minutes, but he's been a known quantity to NBA personnel folks for years, even before he was out of high school. When Dallas Mavericks assistant coach Dwane Casey was coaching Japan's national team in the mid-1990s, Casey let Tabuse play in some of the exhibition games leading up to the 1998 FIBA World Championships, cementing Tabuse's rock-star status at home. The little speedster's celebrity is such that he appeared on the cover of the Japanese edition of EA Sports' "NBA Live" video game in 2006, despite the fact that he was waived in training camp by the Los Angeles Clippers in the fall of 2005 and didn't play at all in the NBA in the preceding season.

    "He's the Ichiro of Japanese basketball," Casey says.

    He's also still waiting for that NBA recall, true, but Tabuse remains unconvinced that his window is as shut as it seems. He's oblivious to the likelihood that even his biggest NBA fans in Dallas -- who gave Tabuse his first summer-league shot in 2003 before inviting him back in 2006 and 2009 -- almost certainly don't have the appetite to develop another small guard after getting as much as the Mavs have out of J.J. Barea.

    Although he's spent the past two seasons in the JBL, after a three-season run in the D-League trying to stay on the NBA's radar, Tabuse's agents Ian Rubel and Marc Cornstein managed to secure an NBA out clause in his Brex contract, just in case Tabuse is the one who's proven right. Just in case the New York Knicks, as Tabuse keeps believing, will keep him in their thinking somewhere as long as Mike D'Antoni is coaching them.

    "True point guards are one of the most valuable commodities in the sport," Mavericks president of basketball operations Donnie Nelson said. "And Yuta has NBA experience. Those kinds of players are always in the mix."

    Recalling his 2½ months of desert heaven with D'Antoni's Suns, Tabuse said: "It was the best time of my life. It was a dream come true. My dream is still playing [in the] NBA. That hasn't changed."

    Except that it has changed somewhat. From now on, Tabuse will be playing for his flag more than ever. Whether he's with Link Tochigi or the national team or on NBA summer-league duty somewhere trying to keep that lifelong dream alive, Tabuse will also be playing for the visibility he can bring to Japan's crisis, which has left more than 25,000 people either missing or dead … and has turned the Brex Arena Utsunomiya into a shelter for those displaced by the radiation scare.

    "The earthquakes are still coming, two times or three times a day," Tabuse said earlier this week. "So we're worried about the earthquakes and the radioactivity. But we [will] try to overcome this. We try to overcome the disaster.

    "If I keep challenging to make [the] NBA, it's [encouragement] for the Japanese people. Of course I want to play for myself, but I want [to] encourage the victims. I want to play for the Japanese people, especially for the kids."
    -ESPN

    Yuta Tabuse has been vocal of re-joining the National Team after the recent strings of Disaster in Japan this month. Tabuse said on NHK Sports that he will begin working out when he returns to Japan to get in shape for the FIBA Asia Olympic Qualifying Tournament. Tabuse described that qualifying for the London Olympics will be a morale booster for Japan.
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    What did Aoki mean when he said that he now has the right to play for the NT and he didn't before? I didn't understand this quote. Thanks

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    Senior Member CKR13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thespywhozaggedme View Post
    What did Aoki mean when he said that he now has the right to play for the NT and he didn't before? I didn't understand this quote. Thanks
    Aoki was referring to the previous agreement between JABBA and the BJ-League where the National Team Committee alongside a designated head coach (currently Thomas Wiseman) would call upon a BJ-League player for tryouts or inclusion to the National Players Pool, should they need to. A BJ-League player would need permission from the player's team and the BJ-League to be included on the player pool.

    Whereas prior to 2010, before Takumi Ishizaki opted to join the Shimane Susanoo Magic in the BJ-League, JABBA recognized only the JBL as a sole provider for National Team players.

    Still, there are no representatives from the BJ-League on the JABBA Organization.
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    Senior Member CKR13's Avatar
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    Default Kenichi Sako says farewell to the National Team

    Former National Team player Kenichi Sako has bid farewell for the National Team and said that he is far too old to play for the National Team for this year's FIBA Asia Olympic Qualifying Tournament.




    Sako's round of duty with the Japanese National Team are as follows:

    1989 Asian Junior Championships (Manila)
    1991 Asian Championships (Kobe)
    1993 Asian Championships (Jakarta) /East Asian Games (Shanghai)
    1994 Asian Games (Hiroshima)
    1995 Asian Championships (Seoul), Universiade (Fukuoka)
    1997 Asian Championships (Riyadh), / East Asian Games (Busan)
    1998 World Championships (Greece)
    1999 Asian Championships (Fukuoka)
    2000 Asian Championships (Jakarta)
    2006 Asian Games (Doha)
    2007 Asian Championships (Tokushima)
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    Senior Member CKR13's Avatar
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    A number of these players will most likely be in the National Team.


    (Photo Taken during the JBL Charity event April 10, 2011)

    Take out Sako, Satoshi and Orimo ofcourse.
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    Default 2011 National Team Pool

    Today, JBA had announced the player pool for the national team. BJ-League Players are found on the pool. Players were grouped into three categories of:

    (1) National Team Veteran
    (2) Relatively New Players for the National Team
    (3) Potential future National Team Players

    Takehiko Orimo (Basketball Club Hokkaido) 1
    Makoto Nagayama (Panasonic Trians) 1
    Ken Takeda (Link Tochigi Brex) 1
    Fumihiko Aono (Panasonic Trians) 1
    Shunsuke Ito (Link Tochigi Brex) 1
    Tomoo Amino (Aishin Sea Horses) 1
    Yuta Tabuse (Link Tochigi Brex) 1
    Daiji Yamada (Basketball Club Hokkaido) 1
    Shinsuke Kashiwagi (Aishin Sea Horses) 1
    Ryota Sakurai (Basketball Club Hokkaido) 1
    Daisuke Noguchi (Basketball Club Hokkaido) 2
    Atsuya Ota (Hamamatsu Higashi Mikawa Phoenix) 2
    Takumi Ishizaki (Shimane Susanoo Magic) 1
    Shohei Kikuchi (Toshiba Brave Thunders) 2
    Hiroshi Sakai (Hitachi SunRockers) 2
    Takeshi Masanaka (Toyota Alvark) 2
    Yusuke Okada (Toyota Alvark) 1
    Kosuke Takeuchi (Aishin Sea Horses) 1
    Joji Takeuchi (Hitchi SunRockers) 1
    Kenta Hirose (Panasonic Trians) 1
    Matsui Akira (Hitchi SunRockers) 2
    Takuya Kawamura (Link Tochigi Brex) 1
    Humiyo Nishimura (Toyota Alvark) 2
    Ito Hiroshi (Toyota Alvark) 2
    Takeshi Arao (Toyota Alvark) 2
    Hiroshi Kobayashi (Hitachi SunRockers) 2
    Takatoshi Kogawa (Aishin Sea Horses) 2
    Hiroshi Watanabe (Panasonic Trians) 2
    Kanamaru Akira (Panasonic Trians) 2
    Minoru Hara (Tokai University) 3
    Hiroya Kamada (Daito University) 3
    Ezima Makoto (Aoyama) 3
    Sean Hinkley (Link Tochigi Brex) 3
    Yu Nagayoshi (Aoyama) 3
    Hiroshi Tanaka (Tokai University) 3
    Kenta Okabe (University of Japan) 3
    Akira Hashimoto (Utsunomiya Technical High School) 3
    Yuuki Togashi (Montross Christian High School) 3
    Yuta Watanabe (Cheng Gakuen) 3

    Conspicuously, former JBL players now playing in the BJ-League are listed. I am quite taken that the pool does not have some of the BJ-League's finest like Tokyo's Kensuke Tanaka or Saitama's Kazuya Hatano. Even Masahiro Oguchi and Masashi Joho are not in the pool.
    Last edited by CKR13; 04-14-2011 at 10:35 AM.
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    Senior Member sinobball's Avatar
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    Huge list, but basically only 2 BJ leaguers (who played in JBL as you pointed out) are included. It's obvious stupid politics still hinders Japan basketball, just like it is the case in most of the other Asian countries.

    Orimo is 41 years old. I wonder what the world record for longest NT duration is. He's probably older than the dads of some players on the list.

    17-year-old Yuki Togashi (how his name is spelled in America) plays for Montrose Christian high school, currently ranked #3 in the US and alma mater of Kevin Durant, Linas Kleiza etc.
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    Senior Member CKR13's Avatar
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    Interesting read on Shimane Susanoo Magic's combo guard Takumi Ishizaki from the JapanTimes

    Elite player: It's hardly surprising that Takumi Ishizaki has been a tone-setter for Shimane this season. In fact, it wouldn't be a shock if Ishizaki doesn't garner serious consideration for the league's 2010-11 Best Five team.

    Ishizaki is averaging a modest 12.8 points and 4.5 assists in 40 games. But this impact goes far beyond the box score. His leadership, poise and confidence make him a natural choice to be a go-to player in Susanoo Magic coach Zeljko Pavlicevic's demanding system.

    By scoring 22 points on Sunday, Ishizaki demonstrated that doing it in style is a major part of his game. He was 9-for-11 from the field in the series finale against Akita. All told, he has 181 assists and 95 turnovers in the books, respectable numbers for an expansion team's point guard, especially one stacked with several rookies.

    By helping to keep playoff-bound Shimane (22-24 through Sunday) in postseason contention all season, Ishizaki has added another chapter to his registry of on-court accomplishments.

    Consider his earlier achievements: helping Hokuriku High School win an Inter-High School National championships and Tokai University nab a pair of Inter-College National titles. In addition, his time playing for the JBL's Toshiba squad and the Japan national team gave him solid experience before joining Shimane last summer. (He also played for Japan at the Asian Games last fall.)

    "Other bj-league players have some - even more - of the same honors, like (Makoto) Hasegawa and (Kazuhiro) Shoji at Akita, or Naoto Nakamura at Kyoto, but all of those players entered the bj-league well after their prime, at the end of their careers," Happinets coach Bob Pierce said. "Ishizaki is 26, turns 27 this summer, and is in the prime of his basketball career."

    Pierce views Ishizaki as a unique talent who isn't a prototypical point guard.

    "Although listed as a point guard, and that's what he mostly plays, my own opinion is that he's more of a shooter who plays the point," Pierce said. "If he gets within the offensive operating zone, about 2-3 feet outside the 3-point line on in, he's very tough to stop. He shoots a very respectable 35 percent from the 3-point line, but that number goes way up when he's wide open. He was 4-for-5 from the 3-point line against us on Sunday, and a couple of those were daggers that just shattered our chances to make a comeback.

    "Once Ishizaki is in that offensive attacking area he makes great decisions, passing the ball quickly to open teammates, shooting and scoring when open, or making strong drives to the basket. He made some impressive shots on drives this weekend where the defender was trying to block it but he used his body and the angles to get the shot off the backboard and in. He also has good size defensively and doesn't get beat easily."

    That doesn't mean, of course, that Ishizaki doesn't room for improvement.

    "His biggest weakness though is that he's not a great ball handler or super quick like some other truer point guards," Pierce said. "Against Fukuoka on April 2 he had five turnovers as (Masahiro) Kano, who is an outstanding, tenacious defender, really pressured him and forced him to make mistakes. On Sunday we began the second half with a 2-2-1 press and immediately caused an 8-second violation as Ishizaki tried to figure out what to do against the press.

    "Also teams that have Japanese players with good size and defensive skills, like Fukuoka, Osaka and Niigata, can match up with him and not give him open looks at the basket."

    So where does Ishizaki stack up against the league's other Japanese players?

    "(Ryukyu's Tsubasa) Yonamine and (Niigata's Naoto) Takushi, when he wants to be, are probably better point guards," the coach said. "This season (Tokyo's Jumpei) Nakama was a better spot-up 3-pointer shooter. And (Shiga's Masashi) Joho might be a more creative and quicker one-on-one scorer. But for the whole package, Ishizaki is the best. He has mental toughness, doesn't seem to go through the highs and lows like many players, plays at both ends, and is one of the best decision makers once he gets into that offensive operating area."
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    Default Japan 2011 Jerseys

    Official outfitter is ASICS and the Home and Away jerseys are still in black and white but the theme has changed from Fuji to Tsubasa or "Fly High" in a Japanese quotation.


    Ogami (Left) and Kinoshita (Right) displays the uniform.
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    CKR13, many names in your list are spelled way wrong. As you are no native Japanese speaker I assume you used a software (Google translate?) but just a word of advice, they don't work with Chinese characters (Kanji). You have to find the kana spelling of the names because you can have the same Chinese character but pronounced 5 different ways in Japanese.

    For example the "Ito Hiroshi" guy is actually Taishi Ito (or Ito Taishi) who played in the NCAA (Portland). His Toyota teammate is not "Takeshi Arao" but "Gaku Arao". Etc.

    Anyway I just want to point out that Tenketu Harimoto (not "Ezima Makoto") is a naturalized Chinese citizen from Liaoning, his original name is Zhang Tianjie. Currently Chinese players dominate the Japnese HS scene, along with Senegalese players.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sinobball View Post
    Anyway I just want to point out that Tenketu Harimoto (not "Ezima Makoto") is a naturalized Chinese citizen from Liaoning, his original name is Zhang Tianjie. Currently Chinese players dominate the Japnese HS scene, along with Senegalese players.
    OT: Isn't it like the ultimate betrayal for a Chinese citizen to take on Japanese citizenship (especially due to the previous history between the 2 countries)

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Khalid80 View Post
    OT: Isn't it like the ultimate betrayal for a Chinese citizen to take on Japanese citizenship (especially due to the previous history between the 2 countries)
    i think it is,he'll probably get burned alive upon his arrival to lioning
    i just wonder why he prefered the japanese NT over his own
    didint he stand any chance of making it to the final chinese roster ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by lebanese phoenix View Post
    i think it is,he'll probably get burned alive upon his arrival to lioning
    i just wonder why he prefered the japanese NT over his own
    didint he stand any chance of making it to the final chinese roster ?
    in Japan he's free to have as many children as he wants.
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    Senior Member sinobball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lebanese phoenix View Post
    i think it is,he'll probably get burned alive upon his arrival to lioning
    i just wonder why he prefered the japanese NT over his own
    didint he stand any chance of making it to the final chinese roster ?
    ....197cm centers don't even stand any chance of making any CBA team. Almost all Chinese college teams have guys over 200cm.

    He's not the first Chinese guy to be named to the preliminary Japan NT, as Shin Aoshima (a.k.a. Wei Xin) did it last year (without playing a game in the JBL... he was a trainer for a team... they just liked his size).

    In 1991, yes this guy would definitely be considered a traitor. But it is 2011, even though the hatred towards Japan remains. How today's Chinese people think of this issue can be best reflected by the case of Risa Kawamura (a.k.a. Li Shasha) who was named to the Japan Women's Basketball NT last year:
    http://english.sina.com/sports/p/2010/0324/310632.html
    A survey organized by 163.com, one of the biggest news portals in China, shows that 43.5 percent say it is understandable as changing nationality is common nowadays. Of the polled, 30.6 percent think it unacceptable, especially when it comes to the Japanese nationality, and 19.58 percent was ambivalent, saying she doesn’t need to change her name, with the remaining 6.2 percent expressing that it is hard to jump to conclusions.
    Li Shasha aka Kawamura actually now works for a women's club in China while playing for another club in Japan. She's responsible for getting some Japanese players to WCBA.

    I have always been against players changing their names when they naturalize, although I understand the reasons, and there is an added complexity changing from a Chinese name to a Japanese name, as no matter what one does the name's pronunciation will change drastically. As for naturalization itself, either for better standards of living or for better basketball opportunities, I am all for it. There are a lot of Chinese players in Japan in recent years, even some good ones who could easily make the CBA or WCBA (Li Shasha was a WCBA player for many years.) For example, 21-year-old Cao Yuchen (202cm, former Shanghai Shark, probably pronounced something like Sou Ushin in Japan but could be something more drastic) was named to the All-Tournament Team at the 50th Kanto Collegiate Basketball Tournament, along with Harimoto (the guy of the entire discussion). There is also a Chinese girl who's dominating the Japanese college scene, and she's prepared to make the jump to the American NCAA next year.

    ************************************************

    Now let's go back to topic....
    the other naturalized player on this roster is Sean Hinkley, a 6'7'' American who played for Cal Poly once. Like the Chinese kid, he's also very young (1991).
    Last edited by sinobball; 04-19-2011 at 08:31 PM.
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    Senior Member CKR13's Avatar
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    CKR13, many names in your list are spelled way wrong. As you are no native Japanese speaker I assume you used a software (Google translate?) but just a word of advice, they don't work with Chinese characters (Kanji). You have to find the kana spelling of the names because you can have the same Chinese character but pronounced 5 different ways in Japanese.
    Not at all, I never trust google with its translator. I had the list from a friend in Japan, who is not adept with the English language. I do read basic Japanese, with my mother being a Language Guru (She can speak, read and write Japanese, Korean, Mandarin and Cantonese) Next time, I'll enlist her aid.
    Last edited by CKR13; 04-21-2011 at 04:44 AM.
    Sacramento Kings
    HERE WE STAY UNTIL THE COWBELLS COME HOME

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