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Thread: The Accomplishments of P.Noy

  1. #21

    Default Hostage Crisis

    The Palace refused to comment on the 10-hour hostage crisis that is taking place at the Quirino grandstand since early Monday morning.

    The Palace, however, stressed that two government departments have started conducting “stress debriefing” of the freed hostages.

    It also noted that President Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III is closely monitoring the hostage crisis.

    “We will not comment now on efforts to free the hostages so as not to impede the authorities,” said Presidential Communications Development Secretary Ricky Carandang.

    Negotiations with the hostage taker Rolando Mendoza has been going on since early Monday morning.

    Mendoza, a former policeman who was discharged in 2008 for his alleged involvement in drug-related crimes and extortion, demanded his reinstatement in exchange of the hostages.

    Departments of Tourism (DoT) and the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) have started the debriefing of the freed hostages.

    As of this writing, at least nine hostages including Chinese nationals were released by the suspect.

    “They have been brought back to their hotel and being provided food and accommodations for free,” said Carandang.

    Carandang said the DoT and DSWD are helping hostages “cope with the stressful situation and make the remainder of their stay as comfortable as possible.”[/QUOTE]

    (UPDATE 23) Philippine security forces stormed a bus full of Hong Kong tourists on Monday to end a dramatic hostage crisis that unfolded live on global television, leaving at least seven people and the gunman dead.

    Hong Kong eventually issued its top-level black travel alert for the Philippines on Monday after Hong Kong tourists were killed in Manila in a bus hijack by an armed ex-policeman.

    The Hong Kong government said it was “very disappointed” about the outcome of a dramatic hostage siege.

    The day-long ordeal began when a disgruntled ex-policeman armed with an M-16 assault rifle hijacked the bus in Manila’s tourist district in a desperate bid to get his job back.
    Negotiations broke down after nightfall when the gunman, a highly decorated former senior police inspector identified as Rolando Mendoza, began shooting the passengers, and commandos stormed the bus.

    Police said Mendoza was shot dead by a sniper after he used his captives as “human shields” in the final moments of the 12-hour standoff.

    “I shot two Chinese. I will finish them all if they do not stop,” Mendoza told a local radio station as the police assault was about to get underway.

    “I can see a lot of SWAT (special weapons and tactics police) coming in. I know they will kill me. They should all leave because anytime I will do the same here.”

    Seven of the Hong Kong tourists were confirmed killed, according to doctors at hospitals in Manila and the Hong Kong government, although exactly how they died was not immediately clear.

    Seven tourists, including children, and two Filipinos were freed at various times throughout the day from the bus parked at Rizal Park, a popular tourist destination just a few blocks from police headquarters.

    The Filipino bus driver jumped out of a window and escaped moments before police stormed the vehicle, with his escape and the rest of the crisis broadcast live on television.

    Another four hostages were seen scrambling out of the bus after the siege ended, but the fate of the remaining Hong Kong tourists originally on board the bus remained unknown late on Monday.

    The Hong Kong government issued its top-level black travel alert for the Philippines after the crisis ended, but said it was sending in two charter planes to Manila for the families of the hostages.

    Police were unable to get inside the bus for more than an hour after negotiations broke down and they decided to storm it.

    They encircled the bus, smashed its windows and fired at it, but Mendoza held them off by shooting back.

    The crisis eventually ended when police threw tear gas inside the bus, and fired again.

    “He used the tourists as human shields. But he panicked and retreated to the front of the bus. He was then met with a valley of gunfire,” the assault team’s leader, Superintendent Nelson Yabut told reporters afterwards.

    “One of our snipers managed to shoot him in the head.”

    Mendoza, 55, was honoured by police chiefs in 1986 as one of the top 10 officers in the country.

    But he was discharged in 2008 for his alleged involvement in drug-related crimes and extortion, and he hijacked the bus in a desperate bid to clear his name, according to police.

    “He wants to be reinstated in the service,” Manila district police chief Superintendent Rodolfo Magtibay said early in the day.

    Joseph Tung, executive director of the Travel Industry Council of Hong Kong, said the tourists on the bus were aged between four and 72.

    They were on a three-day tour with Hong Thai Travel and were scheduled to return to Hong Kong late Monday.

    “A serious kidnap incident happened in the Philippines. Hong Kong residents should avoid all travel to the country,” a Hong Kong government spokesman said in a statement.

    “Those who are already there should attend to their personal safety and exercise caution.”

    Monday’s bus hijack recalled a similar hostage-taking in 2007, when a troubled civil engineer armed with a grenade took over a bus and held 30 children but freed them after a 10-hour standoff with police.

    The 2007 drama took place near Manila city hall, just off Rizal Park.

    Monday’s tragedy also added to a fast-growing number of attacks of foreigners in the Philippines.

    Gunmen shot dead a South Korean man in a separate attack on Monday morning in another section of Manila. Police said the incidents were not related.

    Last month, an American, a South African, a Briton and their Filipina partners were killed in spate of murder-robberies in Angeles City north of Manila. The alleged killer was arrested.

    http://ph.yfittopostblog.com/2010/08...ostage-crisis/
    http://ph.yfittopostblog.com/2010/08...ildren-adults/

    Aquino offers condolences to hostage victims’ family
    http://ph.yfittopostblog.com/2010/08...%80%99-family/
    Last edited by alien space bats; 08-23-2010 at 06:18 PM.
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  2. #22
    Senior Member sinobball's Avatar
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    Terrible outcome. For sure there are mad man everywhere, but the way this crisis was handled was just absolutely terrible. Or maybe this was what the gunman hoped to achieve. Either way, I don't think any Chinese wants to visit the Philippines for tourism any more. I know I won't.

    A few years ago a guy in China also abducted a bus full of Aussie tourists, but he was shot dead while nobody else was hurt. Not like this, 8 deaths happening live on TV, ridiculous.
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  3. #23
    Senior Member c_d's Avatar
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    Statement of President Aquino on the August 23, 2010 hostage-taking incident at the Quirino Grandstand

    http://www.gov.ph/2010/08/24/stateme...no-grandstand/

  4. #24

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    the SWAT team need more training! they should killed the guy with sniper easily without hurting any hostages

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by sinobball View Post
    Terrible outcome. For sure there are mad man everywhere, but the way this crisis was handled was just absolutely terrible. Or maybe this was what the gunman hoped to achieve. Either way, I don't think any Chinese wants to visit the Philippines for tourism any more. I know I won't.

    A few years ago a guy in China also abducted a bus full of Aussie tourists, but he was shot dead while nobody else was hurt. Not like this, 8 deaths happening live on TV, ridiculous.
    the hostage-taker should have been immobilized by snipers when he released several hostages. there were a couple of instances when they could have had a clean shot of the suspect as he was assisting the hostages out of the bus. the only problem was that the police were "scared" to shoot the suspect that way because of the possible repercussions such action would have brought them. with the powerful philippine media all around them, that action would certainly be met with a lot of criticism and media pressure would probably force government to axe the policemen involved. goddamn philippine media. I commend China for doing what was needed to be done in the Aussie tourists incident. These kind of people dont deserve a second chance. they should be shot on sight.
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    We shall pray for the victims and the deranged policeman for the eternal repose of their souls. Requiem Aeternam.
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    The scenario would've been almost comical if it wasn't real: SWAT team members without Kevlar vests, shields made of wood, visors put on ass-backwards. The sledgehammer was swung without force, the first tear-gas canister didn't go off. The SWAT members were massed to one side, then the other, as if there was no coherent plan. And to think that just a few months ago, the PNP had a hostage-crisis demonstration.

    This is as much an indictment of the police force's management as it is of the SWAT's members. Times like these, I remember the Euro-generals and the popular notion of local police as "pulis-patola" (literally, loofah police), and somehow it all makes sense to me. You can't get good equipment if the money doesn't even make it to the hands of procurement.

    Also, there should have been a news blackout in place. If I remember correctly, there was a TV inside the bus, and the hostage-taker was tuned in to what was happening outside. The media was telegraphing the policemen's punches, so to speak.
    Keep running, big boy.

  8. #28
    Senior Member dxjayrock2008's Avatar
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    The police operations yesterday is a complete epic failure. Geez!
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    the fucking media blew it big time... there should have been a news blackout...

  10. #30
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    Ten things the Philippines bus siege police got wrong



    A security analyst who has worked in counter-terrorism with the British Army and Scotland Yard, Charles Shoebridge, says the officers involved in Manila's bus siege showed great courage - but they were not properly trained or equipped for the task.


    Here are 10 areas where, in his view, they could have done better.

    1. Determination

    The first officers who tried to storm the bus were driven out by gunshots from the hostage taker, former policeman Rolando Mendoza. "They showed great courage to go on board. It's very crowded, just one aisle down the middle of the bus. But once you get on board it's not unexpected you are going to be fired at. Squads like this have to be made up of very special people, specially trained and selected for their characteristics of courage, determination and aggression. In this case they acted as 99% of the population would have, which was to turn round and get out. They didn't seem to have the necessary determination and aggression to follow the attack through."

    2. Lack of equipment

    The police spent a long time smashing the windows of the bus, whereas explosive charges (known as frame charges) would have knocked in windows and doors instantly. "They had no ladders to get through the windows. They smashed the windows but didn't know what to do next," Mr Shoebridge says. "They almost looked like a group of vandals." Their firearms were also inappropriate - some had pistols, some had assault rifles. Ideally they would have carried a short submachine gun, suitable for use in confined spaces.

    3. Lost opportunity to disarm the gunman

    The video of the drama also shows there were occasions when the gunman was standing alone, during the course of the day, and could have been shot by a sharpshooter. "You are dealing with an unpredictable and irrational individual. The rule should be that if in the course of negotiations an opportunity arises to end the situation decisively, it should be taken," Mr Shoebridge says. Either this possibility did not occur to the officers in charge, he adds, or they considered it and decided to carry on talking.


    Mendoza's gun was not always raised

    4. Lost opportunity to shoot the gunman

    The video of the drama also shows there were occasions when the gunman was standing alone, during the course of the day, and could have been shot by a sharpshooter. "You are dealing with an unpredictable and irrational individual. The rule should be that if in the course of negotiations an opportunity arises to end the situation decisively, it should be taken," Mr Shoebridge says. Either this possibility did not occur to the officers in charge, he adds, or they considered it and decided to carry on talking.

    5. Satisfying the gunman's demands

    "I wondered why the authorities just didn't give in to all of his demands," says Charles Shoebridge. "A promise extracted under force is not a promise that you are required to honour. Nobody wants to give in to the demands of terrorists, but in a situation like this, which did not involve a terrorist group, or release of prisoners, they could have just accepted his demands. He could be reinstated in the police - and then be immediately put in prison for life for hostage taking." The Philippines authorities did in fact give in to the gunman's demands, but too little, too late. One message promised to review his case, while he wanted it formally dismissed. A second message reinstating him as a police offer only arrived after the shooting had started.

    6. Televised proceedings

    The gunman was able to follow events on television, revealing to him everything that was going on around him. This was a "crucial defect in the police handling", Mr Shoebridge says. He adds that police should always consider putting a barrier or screen around the area, to shield the scene from the cameras and keep the hostage taker in the dark.

    7. No element of surprise

    It was clear to the gunman what the police were doing at all times, not only because the whole incident was televised, but also because they moved "laboriously slowly", Mr Shoebridge says. The police did not distract him, so were unable to exploit the "crucial element of surprise".

    8. Safeguarding the public

    At least one bystander was shot, possibly because the public was allowed too close. The bullet from an M16 rifle, as carried by the gunman, can travel for about a mile, so preventing any risk of injury would have been difficult, Mr Shoebridge says, but a lot more could have been done. "When you saw the camera view from above, it was clear there was little command and control of the public on the ground," he says.


    This boy, a bystander, was hit by a stray bullet

    9. Using the gunman's brother to negotiate

    Relatives and close friends can be a double-edged sword, Mr Shoebridge says. While they may have leverage over the hostage taker, what they are saying cannot be easily controlled. In this case, the gunman's brother was included in the negotiations - however, at a certain stage he became agitated and police started to remove him from the scene. The gunman saw this on television, and became agitated himself. According to one report he fired a warning shot.

    10. Insufficient training

    In some parts of the Philippines, such as Mindanao, hostage taking is not an uncommon occurrence, so the country has some forces that are well trained in the necessary tactics. The detachment involved in Monday's incident clearly was not, says Mr Shoebridge. After smashing the windows, one of the officers eventually put some CS gas inside, though "to what effect was not clear" he says. A unit involved in this work, needs to be "trained again and again, repeatedly practising precisely this kind of scenario," he says.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-11069616

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    Quote Originally Posted by TrueBluePinoy View Post
    Accordingly, that view "The opportunity to disarm or shoot the hostage-taker" was in fact not in the mind of top-ranking police officials or even in malacañang palace.

    1st. He was a police captain (senior inspector). Former colleagues to many policemen who responded to the scene. If mendoza was a notorious criminal, the hostage drama would not last that long. The moment he showed his cover, his head would be blown by a sniper's fire.

    2nd. According to no less than President Noynoy Aquino, sen. insp. mendoza was thought to be not a violent person or a hardened criminal.

    The second misconception turned out to be a deadly and tragic mistake.

  12. #32
    Senior Member dxjayrock2008's Avatar
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    Default News feed from CNN IReport. Related to Manila Hostage Crisis.

    A letter from a teenage Filipino to the WHOLE WORLD

    August 23, 2010 | Philippines |




    As you are reading this letter, I bet that you have seen/heard about what happened earlier in our country.
    Tourists were hostages of a policeman here, Rolando Mendoza. After a few hours of the horrible crime, some of the victims were dead including the hostage-taker.
    I wrote this letter not just to apologize but also to let everyone know that we Filipinos are not all like Mendoza. We are loving and good-hearted people.
    For so many years, our country has been standing tall and surpassing every dilemma; be it small or big. Years ago (back when I wasn’t born yet), you have watched us fight for what we think is right. We fought for the democracy of our nation.. The EDSA revolution. But that’s just one out of many.
    Second. We Filipinos have been serving other countries for our families and we treat you as our own as well. With all due respect, I thank you all for giving us the trust through the years. For helping us to become what we are now.
    The Philippines is more than just a group of islands. We are a nation of strong and remarkable people. A country of beauty and love known to be hospitable and well-valued. I humbly apologize for what happened tonight. No one in this world would want something like that to happen for life should be valued.
    I politely ask the attention of the world. Please do not judge and mistreat us just because of what happened tonight. I have been searching the net and found terrible things. Hong Kong advices to avoid travels here, China and HK bans Filipinos and that Philippines is the worst place to go.
    I can’t blame you for what you have decided but I hope that you could understand. Our country is now in a sea of problems. And I know for sure that we helped you in a way or another. Let peace and understanding reign this time.
    I know that this letter will just be trash but I wish that you would understand. On behalf of the Philippine population.. WE ARE SORRY.
    As a song puts it…
    And I believe that in my life I will see an end to hopelessness, giving-up and suffering. And we all stand together this one time then no one will get left behind. Stand up for life. STAND UP FOR LOVE
    Sincerely yours,
    Reigno Jose Dilao
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    Senior Member sinobball's Avatar
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    These photos are all over HK newspapers these days. I don't need to tell you what sentiments they invoke.
    Last edited by sinobball; 08-25-2010 at 11:58 PM.
    aim low, score high

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    The Hostage crisis was an unfortunate and ill-fated incident
    I hope it won't happen again. God Bless the Philippines

  15. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by sinobball View Post



    These photos are all over HK newspapers these days. I don't need to tell you what sentiments they invoke.
    well, you cannot please everybody. certainly, no one should be forced to grieve just to please chinese authorities.on the other hand, i am terribly grieving for the senseless loss of human lives as "every man's death diminishes me". at the same time, i am terribly ashamed for the acts of some filipinos who are at the wrong place at the wrong time.

    The stupid police chief, along with his equally inept subordinates,should be immediately sacked for not cordoning off the crime scene right after the carnage.what's keeping the authorities from filing the proper administrative charges against these nincompoops?only noynoy knows for sure. heads should really roll and fast. allowing insensitive people to linger near the bus and have their photos taken is really unforgiveable, considering what had just transpired before that.
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  16. #36
    Senior Member dxjayrock2008's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sinobball View Post



    These photos are all over HK newspapers these days. I don't need to tell you what sentiments they invoke.


    This picture depicts adding insult to injury. Taking photo-ops at the crime scene? Gimme a break!
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    Aquino orders formation of elite strike force


    By Norman Bordadora
    Philippine Daily Inquirer
    First Posted 18:16:00 08/27/2010

    Filed Under: hostage taking, Grandstand Hostage, Security (general), News
    MANILA, Philippines—President Aquino has ordered the creation of an “elite strike force” that could be quickly deployed anywhere in the country to address crisis situations such as the hostage incident that resulted in the deaths of eight Hong Kong tourists on Monday.

    Secretary Herminio Coloma of the Presidential Communications and Operations Office said Mr. Aquino wants 200 troopers each from the Armed Forces and the PNP to compose the small but specialized unit.

    Coloma said it was one of the measures that the President adopted after the Chief Executive himself saw how the Manila police bungled the rescue of the Hong Kong tourists held by a disgruntled former policeman, Rolando Mendoza.

    “That is the immediate action that would be implemented on orders of the President,” Coloma said in an interview over radio station dzRH.

    “This is a strong force, highly trained, with modern equipment and could be deployed in any area in the archipelago,” the communications secretary said.

    Mr. Aquino himself said that he already talked with the chiefs of the military and of the police to form the elite unit.

    He also indicated in an earlier news conference that it would be better to concentrate resources on a few highly trained soldiers than have the necessary logistics spread over too many Special Weapons and Tactics teams or SWAT units.

    “So, I already discussed this with Director General Versoza, and also the Chief of Staff General David, that both of their units will be organized that will operate on a national basis but perhaps on a smaller scale so that we can properly maintain them,” President Aquino said.

    The President indicated the country’s special operations teams already received training on dealing with crisis situations in such places as ships, planes and buses but adequate weaponry and ammunition remain an issue.

    “(Instead) of spreading the resources to so many SWAT teams, there would be a principal unit for both the AFP and the PNP to work together especially against large-scale terrorist activity that would have the highest capability possible,” Mr. Aquino said.

    Hayy Mr. Aquino, the Police has this elite unit called "SAF" or "Special Action Forces" which is much better equipped and has sufficient training compared to Manila's Pride. No need to for that "elite strike force" because the SAF guys have joint operations with the Military down south against the Terrorists (which are aligned with the Al Qaeda) and has training with USA military.

    During hostage crisis, the SAF was already on stand-by near by to handle the situation but the Manila Police instead used their ill-equipped, poorly-trained Special Weapons and Tactics team.
    you know why I am happy

  18. #38
    Senior Member donmar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b3lowzro View Post
    Hayy Mr. Aquino, the Police has this elite unit called "SAF" or "Special Action Forces" which is much better equipped and has sufficient training compared to Manila's Pride. No need to for that "elite strike force" because the SAF guys have joint operations with the Military down south against the Terrorists (which are aligned with the Al Qaeda) and has training with USA military.

    During hostage crisis, the SAF was already on stand-by near by to handle the situation but the Manila Police instead used their ill-equipped, poorly-trained Special Weapons and Tactics team.
    hehehehe.. I think anyone with Counter Strike training and experience will qualify for his "elite strike force".. in that case, I'm in

    He probably doesn't know what SAF... historically, SAF is the PC/PNP anti-coup unit and pretty much the most elite unit in the PNP.. unfortunately, the "Sorry Wala Akong Training" (SWAT) squad is favoured by the government to do the urban rescue operations


  19. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by donmar View Post
    hehehehe.. I think anyone with Counter Strike training and experience will qualify for his "elite strike force".. in that case, I'm in

    He probably doesn't know what SAF... historically, SAF is the PC/PNP anti-coup unit and pretty much the most elite unit in the PNP.. unfortunately, the "Sorry Wala Akong Training" (SWAT) squad is favoured by the government to do the urban rescue operations
    this President is "puro papogi". (all talk) he's clueless. it's been more than two months since he assumed the post and we have not seen any positive reforms.

    We already have SAF since McOy's tenure. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special_Action_Force
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  20. #40
    Senior Member dxjayrock2008's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b3lowzro View Post
    Hayy Mr. Aquino, the Police has this elite unit called "SAF" or "Special Action Forces" which is much better equipped and has sufficient training compared to Manila's Pride. No need to for that "elite strike force" because the SAF guys have joint operations with the Military down south against the Terrorists (which are aligned with the Al Qaeda) and has training with USA military.

    During hostage crisis, the SAF was already on stand-by near by to handle the situation but the Manila Police instead used their ill-equipped, poorly-trained Special Weapons and Tactics team.


    PNoy is not really cerebral enough. Lol.
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