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7-foot Indian-Canadian brothers: Tanveer and Sim Bhullar

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  • 3Scout4India
    replied
    Originally posted by Czarkazem13 View Post
    Do you have a source?
    One of their teammate at Kiski HS is my source. The situation right now is that they are willing to play for India but they only have canadian citizenship.

    The rule that don't allow player with dual citizenship to play for India is really insane. Especially now, when India have two NBA prospects. It would be sad for indian basketball to see the Bhullar brothers wearing the canadian jersey.

    Leave a comment:


  • silentassassin
    replied
    dual citizenship

    that is a dumbest rule india could have made only to protect the people who live in india and play ball, afgan had college d1 or d2 atleast players on their squad, actuall if im not mistaken pretty much their whole team was from over here, anyways talkin about best ''indian' players, this discussion starts and ends with pasha bains from surrey...aint no one even close to this guy....he played at clemson university which is in the acc over here in the states, thats division one, and the two brothers on the east coast, shouldnt go play in the asian games, they should try to get into the Nba ANd only if that fAILs then go there but as of right now they are uncordinated and sort of loppy but they are young so the jury is still out on that one but PASHA BAINS, google it...and

    Leave a comment:


  • c_d
    replied
    Have you informed them about this rule below?

    Originally posted by yudhistir View Post
    Finally, I have many mails on players willing to play for India, But I would inform that the IOC (Indian Olympic Council) has made a law that players with DUAL CITIZENSHIP ARE NOT PERMITTED to represent the country in any sport. If you really want to then you have to surrender the foreign passport.And don't worry I have conveyed the same to Anish.

    Leave a comment:


  • Czarkazem13
    replied
    Originally posted by 3Scout4India View Post
    Great news today, Bhullar brothers are willing to play for India. Now India may have two amazing center for the next decade.
    Do you have a source?

    Leave a comment:


  • 3Scout4India
    replied
    Great news today, Bhullar brothers are willing to play for India. Now India may have two amazing center for the next decade.

    Leave a comment:


  • AlbionGate
    Guest replied
    Forgot to mention that Bhullar brothers are from Indian descent. They usualy play together on the court.

    There is also a third Bhullar in US high-school (no family link with Sim and Tanveer as far I as know), his name is Jagdeep Bhullar, he is junior at Independence HS, in San José, California. Jagdeep is 6'0" tall.

    So this is my current list of indian players in US high schools.

    Sim Bhullar (7'4", Kiski, sophomore)
    Tanveer Bhullar (7'2", Kiski, freshman)
    Jagdeep Bhullar (6'0", Idependence, junior)

    Leave a comment:


  • AlbionGate
    Guest started a topic 7-foot Indian-Canadian brothers: Tanveer and Sim Bhullar

    7-foot Indian-Canadian brothers: Tanveer and Sim Bhullar

    7-Foot Is Nice, Especially Twice

    Brothers take their show to a tiny Pennsylvania prep school.
    by Stephen Brodzinski

    The old saying, ‘Big fish in a small pond,’ couldn’t be more true in this case. Imagine a small, all-boys boarding school in the beautiful mountains of Saltsburg, PA, with an enrollment of about 210 students. The Kiski School is known for being one of the top academic schools in the country, with rich traditions and successful alumni. The athletic programs have been competitive, but the basketball program has never achieved great success. This past summer, former Division I coach Daryn Freedman took over as head basketball coach, and within weeks, things changed. Meet Coach Freedman’s new front court, a pair of 7-foot brothers from Toronto, Canada.

    Sim and Tanveer Bhullar are the first tandem of 7-foot brothers to play together, since Brook and Robin Lopez shined at Mater Dei High School in Santa Ana, CA. Sim is a sophomore listed at 7-4, while his freshman brother Tanveer is listed at 7-2. Yes, we said freshmen and sophomore!

    Both brothers are already highly ranked, with Tanveer being ranked among the top players in the Class of 2013 by some reports. For their enormous size at young ages, they both already possess an uncanny skill level and understanding of how to play the game. Head coach Daryn Freedman thinks the brothers are a special duo: “Their combination of height, strength, great hands and understanding of the game makes their upside unlimited.”

    To put this phenomenon into perspective, on the all-time list of millions of high school and college basketball players, you may find a short page of former or current 7-0 athletes. Even in the NBA right now, you may be able to count the number of actual 7-footers on two hands. Every so often you will hear about a high school basketball player reaching the 7-0 horizon, but almost never as a freshman or sophomore. And while the pool of 6-8 guys seems to have deepened over the years, the sprinkling of true big men has seemed to be running dry. Coach Freedman talks about the luxury of not only having one 7-footer, but having two on the same team, “In my nine years as a Division 1 assistant, I never saw a freshman or sophomore in high school that big, with that ability. Now I have both Sim and Tanveer that I can coach and help develop.”

    Sim and Tanveer will definitely be developed, being pushed by Kiski Prep’s new staff of former college and pro coaches. While they definitely need to get stronger, lose some weight, and gain some bounce, it is sometimes difficult to remember that they are so young. And having each other to play against on a daily basis, could be one of the greatest advantages for the young duo. While most vertically gifted high school athletes will have to practice against much smaller teammates, Sim and Tanveer will be able to play against another 7-footer every day.

    Growing up in Toronto, Sim says the he and his brother were close from a young age: “It is nice to have someone to always talk to and relate to, and we always challenge each other to go harder.” The value in them challenging each other to go harder is seen in every practice. Watching Sim try to dunk on Tanveer, or seeing Tanveer hit a jump hook over Sim, is just flat out fun to watch. Tanveer also understands the importance of having his brother to play against: “Playing with and against Sim helps me develop as a basketball player. I get to practice my offensive skills on a defender who can challenge me and I also get to practice my defense on him.”

    As they continue to improve, the brothers will be all over the national recruiting radar. They already garner tons of attention no matter where they go. At tournaments, parents pull out cell phones to take videos of the enormous pair, and people constantly ask for pictures. So it seems almost natural that Sim and Tanveer are tucked away in the hills of western Pennsylvania. Wanting to attend school in the United States, they chose the Kiski School for its great academic history, nurturing environment, and the belief that Coach Freedman and staff could maximize their potential. Though they stick out like a sore thumb walking through the scenic campus, they both feel at home in their new environment, and have already shown early success both on the court and in the classroom.

    Hoping to continue this success, both Sim and Tanveer have big aspirations to match their big frames. They hope to play at high major DI schools and someday make it to the NBA. Coach Freedman, who served on the staff of both the New Jersey Nets and Philadelphia 76ers, sees this as a real possibility, “Both Sim and Tanveer have shown the ability to dominate when they are at their best. With a lack of quality centers in Division 1 and the NBA these days, as the two continue to improve, there will be a lot of people watching them on a daily basis.”

    And many are already watching. The Kiski School has frequent visits from Division I coaches, checking out the potential
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