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KONSTANTINE
09-17-2007, 04:25 PM
of course is considered the greatest basketball school of europe.
is there a specific era where happened this "boom" of yugoslavian basketball history?.why this sport is so famous and produced and producing so many talents?

elaj
09-17-2007, 05:21 PM
of course is considered the greatest basketball school of europe.
is there a specific era where happened this "boom" of yugoslavian basketball history?.why this sport is so famous and produced and producing so many talents?

I talked like two years ago with some coach and he said that probably the fact ex-yugoslavian countries such as Slovenia, Croatia, Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina produce (and produced in the past) so much talent is that coaches are well educated (mostly) and are always speaking in favour of discipline and hard work.

For example, almost all ex-Yugoslavian clubs will start their preparations for upcoming season some where around 1. August, while rest of Europe still sleeps, let say until middle of September. It doesn't matter if they have their main players with National Team selections.

Generally looking, in all those countries basketball is ranked among first two favourite sports (football is some where more popular), that also ofcourse speaks in favour of making talents.

Speaking just for Slovenia in summer time you have alot of streetball tournaments and other activities which also popularize the sport. To be honest I can't name a village in Slovenia that doesn't have a basketball court/gym or that court/gym isn't near enough to go there by bike or foot. ;)

Here is the article of Janez Drvarič (well known basketball worker here in ex-yugoslavia area), who is speaking about Slovenian basketball youth program. I saved this two articles from Adriatic League forum quite some time ago.

http://shrani.si/t/18/zx/4Dpg50Pr/drvaric1.jpg (http://shrani.si/?18/zx/4Dpg50Pr/drvaric1.jpg)
http://shrani.si/t/T/zO/4iheoqUn/drvaric2.jpg (http://shrani.si/?T/zO/4iheoqUn/drvaric2.jpg)
http://shrani.si/t/I/Ze/1l1pjg4K/drvaric3.jpg (http://shrani.si/?I/Ze/1l1pjg4K/drvaric3.jpg)
http://shrani.si/t/K/W3/2otzg5S7/drvaric4.jpg (http://shrani.si/?K/W3/2otzg5S7/drvaric4.jpg)

And here is also youth program of Serbia/Montenegro, great stuff to read, even more detailed.
http://shrani.si/t/1i/AK/hc1dSuy/cenic1.jpg (http://shrani.si/?1i/AK/hc1dSuy/cenic1.jpg)
http://shrani.si/t/1m/xe/1Zw1yt39/cenic2.jpg (http://shrani.si/?1m/xe/1Zw1yt39/cenic2.jpg)
http://shrani.si/t/1m/jR/4JnXvRqJ/cenic3.jpg (http://shrani.si/?1m/jR/4JnXvRqJ/cenic3.jpg)
http://shrani.si/t/39/xV/1PDHYYCA/cenic4.jpg (http://shrani.si/?39/xV/1PDHYYCA/cenic4.jpg)
http://shrani.si/t/3J/Fx/4BdpSgv/cenic5.jpg (http://shrani.si/?3J/Fx/4BdpSgv/cenic5.jpg)
http://shrani.si/t/b/Zw/z8LKmP1/cenic6.jpg (http://shrani.si/?b/Zw/z8LKmP1/cenic6.jpg)
http://shrani.si/t/14/le/2knH8bSc/cenic7.jpg (http://shrani.si/?14/le/2knH8bSc/cenic7.jpg)

Civilis
09-17-2007, 06:01 PM
I have read an interview with Bozidar Maljkovic a while ago in Lithuanian basketball magazine and he said an interesting thing:

"Everybody has already forgotten the fact that former Yugoslavia has learnt basketball from the Bulgarian players and coaches"

It would be interesting to know more details about Bulgarian influence :)

KONSTANTINE
09-17-2007, 06:02 PM
omg.
while i was reading the offensive and defensive techniques practice paper
i remembered the same things i were practising when i was playing in basketball team in my town when i was 12.you brought up great memories
great articles

Buducnost PG
09-17-2007, 06:51 PM
I have read an interview with Bozidar Maljkovic a while ago in Lithuanian basketball magazine and he said an interesting thing:

"Everybody has already forgotten the fact that former Yugoslavia has learnt basketball from the Bulgarian players and coaches"

It would be interesting to know more details about Bulgarian influence :)

I am asking me that, too. Never heard about this before. But i know that one of the most important persons for the succes of yugoslavian basketball was Aleksander Nikolic (god bless him).

KokkinosVasilias
09-17-2007, 07:33 PM
Actually yugoslavian didnt (doesnt) have only good basketball school,
they were/are also good in volleyball, water polo, football

actually that was the case (at a higher or a lower level) in almost (probably all) countries that had communist regime.

Wouldnt you consider USSR also a great "basketball school"
Soviets were also great in almost all sports

dont forget that even Czechoslovakia had a powerfull basketball NT a few decades ago,

those countries were working methodically to produce great athletes through disciplened programs,
there was mass and school athletism

KONSTANTINE
09-17-2007, 07:54 PM
yeah yr right there were communist countries
but how communism affected sports.in what way?
there was a special program for the youth?

KokkinosVasilias
09-17-2007, 08:25 PM
yeah yr right there were communist countries
but how communism affected sports.in what way?
there was a special program for the youth?




those countries were working methodically to produce great athletes through disciplened programs,
there was mass and school athletism


English, please

come on! take it easy,
it was a translation of "there was mass and school athletism" =
"λαικος και σχολικος αθλητισμος"

KokkinosVasilias
09-17-2007, 08:30 PM
http://www.ici.ro/romania/en/sport/index.html


After World War II, during the communist regime sport was considered "a state issue of national interest" and its mission, the same as in the other East European states, was to increase the prestige not only of the country but also of the regime on the world scene. In terms of material infrastructure, that attitude was of great benefit. Significant investment was made in sports centres, supplies and equipment; two sports hours per week were compulsory during the entire school cycle and schools with intensive sports training were opened. Stadiums, sports grounds and sports halls were built in the large cities, but not too many swimming pools and skating einks. Mass sports were encouraged.

Afraid
09-18-2007, 03:52 PM
yeah yr right there were communist countries
but how communism affected sports.in what way?
there was a special program for the youth?

Zalgiris was one of the reasons why Lithuania was the first country to leave Soviet Union. USSR basketball Nt didnt have a lot russian players in it. Sabonis, Marciulionis, Chomicius, Kurtinaits was players of starting five, they all were Lithuanians, also there was Volkov, Kacenko, Miglinegs, Enden were from Ukraine, Latvia and Estonia so i wouldnt talk a lot abt USSR or Russia "basketball scholl".

KokkinosVasilias
09-18-2007, 09:17 PM
USSR basketball Nt didnt have a lot russian players in it. Sabonis, Marciulionis, Chomicius, Kurtinaits was players of starting five, they all were Lithuanians, also there was Volkov, Kacenko, Miglinegs, Enden were from Ukraine, Latvia and Estonia .


so what?

Lithuania all that time wasnt a part of the CCCP?

CCCP wasnt only Russia and Russia wasnt CCCP,
Russia was just a part of that country as it was Lietuva, Latvia etc.

so when someone says that CCCP had a great basketball school he doesnt necessarily talk only about Russia

when you say that americans have great players and they have a good school you make a distinction if they are from California or Alabama or Illinois?

all the players you mentioned they were not Russians but they all were Soviets, so Soviet Union (and not Russia) had a great basketball school as it had in almost all sports

that goes for Yugoslavia (before 1990), they had great players, Serbs, Croats, Slovenians... still it was "Yugoslavia"

rikhardur
09-18-2007, 09:35 PM
Russia had and has a good basketball school. Perhaps excluding most Liths at the time, players from other republics would learn their basics and develop in Russia, being a product of Russian basketball school. They could be "foreigners", but they learned how to play basketball in Russia and as KokkinosVasilias said it was the Soviet Union (even though most republics despised all USSR stood for, I know). Let's not underestimate Russian power in sports, because it's not just in basketball that they have fared well over the decades.
I know it's a delicate subject, but I felt the need to leave my opinion ;)

ArkadiosV2
09-19-2007, 01:41 AM
USSR had a terrific influence on it's members, sports wise.

Dinamo Tbilisi for example was top class contenders in European cups both in bball and football for example.

Dinamo Kiev won European Cups Winners in the 70's

Even Armenia was so strong that Ararat Yerevan won the USSR football championship in 73, when clubs out of Moscow and Kiev winning anything was unheard of.

So don't underestimate USSR sports programs.

L3Xm0n3y
09-19-2007, 02:38 AM
sweet thanx for the post

Stojakovic
09-19-2007, 06:36 PM
thanks so much. fantastic document.

LuDux
09-19-2007, 07:02 PM
Lithuanians played in USSR NT, but basketball was pretty autonomous. Coaches and players from Lithuania rarely worked outside Lithuania. Exception - some players were forced to play outside Lithuania while in army. So Lithuanian basketball school does not equals Soviet basketball school. I'm sure situation in other countries occupied by Russia (Russia, not russians) was similar.

Civilis
09-20-2007, 08:10 AM
USSR had a terrific influence on it's members, sports wise.

Dinamo Tbilisi for example was top class contenders in European cups both in bball and football for example.

Dinamo Kiev won European Cups Winners in the 70's

Even Armenia was so strong that Ararat Yerevan won the USSR football championship in 73, when clubs out of Moscow and Kiev winning anything was unheard of.

So don't underestimate USSR sports programs.

here you just confirm the importance of local schools and traditions rather than some "USSR programmes". Of course, I agree that sports was a huge policy/political priority in the Soviet Union, btu the traditions and passion for certain sports were local.

The biggest effect on the rising quality of sports in the republics was the big competition with strong rivals teams in this big country and closed, in a way "self-sufficient" system where players were not leaving for the foreign clubs. Of course, once such system collapsed it collapsed. For example, in Ltihuania now we have more high quality players that at times of Soviet Union because thanks to globalization many youngsters see basketball as the way to achieve something in life and they continue to develop themselves in the traditional local basketball schools.