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BBallfanJ
07-15-2007, 01:10 AM
Now that it appears Luis Scola will finally make the jump to the NBA after a trade and signing a deal with Houston, how do you think he'll do in his rookie NBA season?

Phantim3dx
07-15-2007, 04:46 AM
backup center of Yao, or perhaps playing some tandom time with him. well yao and scola can play good guy bad guy. yao being the quiet one, and scola being the one throwing elbows and other forms to destabilize the other team. i like it!

ajaxballer
07-15-2007, 05:00 AM
I hope Scola isn't coming over a couple years too late, but
i'm sure he'll contribute in Adelman's offense anyways.

rikhardur
07-15-2007, 11:22 AM
He's reported to sign a three-year deal. I chose option 3, I seriously think he can make it.

Czarkazem13
07-15-2007, 06:24 PM
He should get a fair shake. The Rockets need help at the 4.

Levenspiel
07-15-2007, 11:11 PM
If only he had a good point guard. I'm sure he will miss Prigioni.

I chose the second option.

ajaxballer
07-15-2007, 11:42 PM
How does Scola compare to Garbajosa? They both play the 4
position and "Garbo" averaged almost 9 pts and 5 rebs this
year. Do you guys think Scola's game fits the NBA better?

Phantim3dx
07-15-2007, 11:50 PM
How does Scola compare to Garbajosa? They both play the 4
position and "Garbo" averaged almost 9 pts and 5 rebs this
year. Do you guys think Scola's game fits the NBA better?


if it means throwing bows, then he definitely fits

stuart
07-21-2007, 12:05 AM
How does Scola compare to Garbajosa? They both play the 4
position and "Garbo" averaged almost 9 pts and 5 rebs this
year. Do you guys think Scola's game fits the NBA better?

Scola is more a inside player, whereas Garbajosa starts outside-in.

Stuart

robbe
07-21-2007, 12:31 PM
Agree with sariss. He's amazing in combination with a good pick and roll point guard. Houston doesn't have that, and they're very rare in the NBA in general.

But imo Adelman is one of the best coaches in the league, and playing alongside Yao (will draw a lot of attention) will help too. I'd go with 13 and 6.

stuart
07-28-2007, 07:45 PM
Smart, experienced and skilled. Scola will do just fine.

Stuart

Lebron23
08-14-2007, 09:23 PM
I think Scola will be a decent PF in the NBA but i cannot see him averaging more than 18 Points Per game.

I say his peak numbers in the NBA is 15.9 PPG, 6.1 Rebs and 0.8 BPG.

alermac
08-15-2007, 10:43 PM
I think Scola will be a decent PF in the NBA but i cannot see him averaging more than 18 Points Per game.

I say his peak numbers in the NBA is 15.9 PPG, 6.1 Rebs and 0.8 BPG.
Well, 18 points per game would almost make him a star... With Yao and TMac he won't have that many shots, but Luis can adapt to a secondary role.

stuart
09-02-2007, 06:30 PM
Pulled this from CNN/SI: link (http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/chris_mannix/08/30/scola.brazil/)


Happy in Houston
Argentina's Scola about to make his mark on NBA

It was a typical NBA play in a very non-NBA game.

With 30 seconds left and Argentina leading by four in overtime of their quarterfinal matchup with Brazil, Luis Scola moved towards the top of the key to set a screen for Argentinean guard Pablo Prigioni. With Brazil's Nene attached to his hip, Scola set a textbook screen that freed Prigioni and forced Nene to shift off Scola. Prigioni lobbed the ball back to Scola for a wide open 15-foot jump shot on the left elbow. Swish. Ballgame.

Scola may be the best player in this tournament who has never played an NBA minute, though as a recently signed property of the Houston Rockets that will certainly change. The 6-foot-10 power forward is averaging 17.9 points on 53.8 percent shooting in the FIBA America's tournament and has a depleted Brazil team (they are without Manu Ginobili, Fabricio Oberto, Andres Nocioni, Carlos Delfino and Walter Hermann) undefeated heading into Thursday's game against the United States.

"I really like Scola," says former Rockets coach and Lakers scout Rudy Tomjanovich. "He's the kind of guy who doesn't do anything great but does everything well. He's smart and he has the size and strength to be an NBA power forward."

So why has the 27-year old Scola, a two-time Spanish League MVP, been toiling in Europe with Tau Ceramica the last five years while Argentinean national teammates Oberto and Ginobili have been racking up titles in San Antonio?

Part of the blame for that has to be placed on the Spurs, who have a history of drafting players and leaving them overseas until they need them. In 2005 San Antonio attempted to bring Scola aboard but failed to come to terms with Tau on a buyout (Tau initially was asking for a staggering $14.5 million for Scola). While continuing negotiations in 2006, the Spurs reportedly told Scola after the season that they would probably not sign him, due to the fact that they did not want to invest in another power forward after signing Oberto and trading for Matt Bonner. They also had questions about how well Scola would play alongside to Tim Duncan.

The decision prompted outrage from Scola's camp, which claimed the Spurs were holding Scola "prisoner" and that they were trying to "impede him" from playing in the NBA. "I did want to play in the NBA last season," admitted Scola moments scoring 23 points in Argentina's 86-79 victory over Brazil. "But it just didn't work out."

That's not to say there wasn't interest in Scola from other teams. With the Spurs again passing on signing Scola this summer, they opened the bidding to other teams interested in vying for his draft rights. Detroit, Seattle and Cleveland all expressed interest but it was Houston who emerged the winner, dealing Vassilis Spanoulis (who later bolted for Europe), a second-round draft pick and cash considerations for a man who has been touted as Europe's top player. "As an organization, we felt responsible to allow Luis to pursue his dream of the NBA," Spurs general manager R.C. Buford said at the time, "and this was the best opportunity to realize his value." The Rockets immediately signed Scola to a three-year, $9.3 million contract and paid $500,000 toward his buyout.

"He's a very active player," said LeBron James. "He's the kind of guy you have to find and keep a body on all the time."

"I think Scola is going to fit in great in Houston's system," says Tomjanovich, who compares Scola to former Laker Kurt Rambis. "He's very active and he passes the ball extremely well. Houston's not going to ask much of him offensively because of all the weapons they have their, but he is showing in this tournament that he can knock down that perimeter jump shot."

Scola will probably get a number of chances to do just that. The Rockets have a gaping hole at the power forward position next season and will likely pencil Scola's name into the starting slot. It's a role he is prepared for, even if it is long overdue.

"I feel like I'm ready," says Scola, who says he feels no animosity for San Antonio. "It's the next step in my career. When this tournament is over, it's all I am going to think about."

rikhardur
11-02-2007, 08:52 PM
First two games of the season and he only managed to score in the second game: 7 points, adding 9 rebounds + 1 assist + 1 steal in 29 minutes.

Neozyrus
11-03-2007, 12:47 AM
Seems like he's gonna be in the strating 5 as the PF, the problem is that apparently by now he's not gonna be allowed to shoot a lot, so his offensive numbers wont be impressive. But after seeing him playing (and getting impressed) every weekend for the last years i am almost sure (and really hope) that he will become a really important player in the league. Maybe playing alongside with yao and tracy Mac wont let him to be never in an All Star but i really believe that in a team in wich he would be the inside reference in attack, he could amaze more than one person there.

alermac
11-03-2007, 04:50 AM
I just hope the difference in calling moving picks won't hurt him that much.

Phantim3dx
11-03-2007, 09:33 AM
okay so for the first game he looked shaky and nervous against the lakers.

HOWEVER during the tough bruisin and cruisin utah jazz. scola was a big time pf. stat wise maybe not so great. but let's not think he'll just ride the bench just yet. from what i saw between the jazz and laers game scola jsut probably had the butterflies.

if it was not for scola in that game things could have certainly turned out different. scola does what scola does best and that's be aggressive and defensively punish the other team. i really dont care who starts whether its hayes or scola. however im assuming RA is keeping scola on the 2nd front when he needs to go smaller and a faster style of play.

now stat wise scola may have not had a high number, but all those rebounds he had(9) against utah were during crucial moments. not to mention the hustle he showed.

he's in my book as players id want bangin low

Phantim3dx
11-04-2007, 05:04 AM
against portland.

he's pretty consistent so far 8 pts 8 boards. more playing time and confidence i think hr will definitely raise those stats as the season continues. and if im not mistaken he is being played as part of the 2nd frontline when RA wants to give the 1st front a break and/or go small

mvblair
11-04-2007, 03:58 PM
now stat wise scola may have not had a high number, but all those rebounds he had(9) against utah were during crucial moments. not to mention the hustle he showed. Well, that's his M.O. It's good that people are seeing him do those things. I wish I could get Houston's games. :(
he's in my book as players id want bangin low I love those kinds of players!

he's pretty consistent so far 8 pts 8 boards. more playing time and confidence i think hr will definitely raise those stats as the season continues. and if im not mistaken he is being played as part of the 2nd frontline when RA wants to give the 1st front a break and/or go small So is Scola starting or coming off the bench? I thought he was going to start...

--Matt

rikhardur
11-04-2007, 08:10 PM
Well, that's his M.O. It's good that people are seeing him do those things. I wish I could get Houston's games. :( I love those kinds of players!
So is Scola starting or coming off the bench? I thought he was going to start...

--Matt
What's M.O.?
Well, there's always the chance to download some, take a look at the NBA video thread :p
True, he didn't play any game as a starter yet, perhaps Adelman is waiting for him to adjust a bit first to the game and then include him in the starting line-up.

Phantim3dx
11-05-2007, 08:16 AM
So is Scola starting or coming off the bench? I thought he was going to start...

--Matt

yep. so far the way RA is using him is the 2nd PF or the 2nd C.

Scola is most productive so far when he fills in for Yao;RA will go small and they seem to run much faster and just confuse the defense...example of this is Yao vs the Jazz(i swear this team is Ya's kryptonite) yao did horrible in this game and scola stepped up to the plate. 8 pts 8 boards 2 fouls 19 min against protland(scola) vs Hayes 4 points 6 boards 23 min.

there have been 2 situations however when scola plays P, when Yao or Motumbo is in the C spot. Yao will either take the shot if he is left alone 1v1 or he has positioned himself so low that nothing is stopping him from scoring. however if the D collapses then Yao kicks out then they swingt he ball all over the perimeter. at this point scola wont take the shot but he is somewhere around giving picks to the other guys who are going to take the open J.

M.O. i forgot the meaning to it but it basically means this is his signature or way of doing things.<---for rik

JET007
11-05-2007, 09:49 AM
expect a great season for houston this year...
t-mac, yao, francis, and scola...:cool:

Phantim3dx
11-05-2007, 02:31 PM
lay off the shabu shabu...francis hasnt even stepped on the court during the reg season. he is out of rotation as we speak.


expect a great season for houston this year...
t-mac, yao, francis, and scola...:cool:

rikhardur
11-18-2007, 01:44 PM
After 11 games, he's averaging 6.8 ppg + 4.4 rpg + 1.0 apg while playing 19.8 mpg.

Neozyrus
11-18-2007, 02:59 PM
And he surely is getting better.

mvblair
03-13-2008, 05:37 PM
Is this Scola thread still open? I guess it's been replaced by the Argentines in the NBA 2007-08 thread, but...

He's averaging 9.2 points and 5.7 rebounds, but probably a lot more the past month or so.

Scola Essential To Rockets (http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/news;_ylt=AqpaG6B2xWTNvmClVI9XMpK8vLYF?slug=scolae ssentialtorocketsw&prov=tsn&type=lgns) -- March 13, 2008, by Stan McNeal, SportingNews

Luis Scola learned he had become the Rockets’ starting power forward at a shootaround in late January. “Coach told me to go over there with the whites (jerseys). If you wear a white jersey, you’re a starter,” Scola said during a phone conversation Wednesday.

No big thing. Tracy McGrady was due out that night with the flu, and coach Rick Adelman was looking for someone to help give the team a quick start. Out went Chuck Hayes, in came the energetic Argentinean.

Twenty games later, Scola is still starting and the Rockets have become a very big thing. They have had not lost since Scola joined the lineup at power forward. Their 83-75 victory at Atlanta Wednesday night stretched their winning streak to 20, matching the second-longest streak in NBA history (Bucks, 1971). Not bad for a team that began the new year 15-17 and wondering if it even would get into the playoff race.

Don’t expect Scola to take much credit for his starting having much to do with the Rockets’ winning streak, though. “It wasn’t a big deal when I was a backup and everyone was asking me when I was going to start, so I can’t make it a big deal now that I am starting,” he says.

Scola, 27, credits the Rockets’ rise to good defense (the Rockets are holding opponents to 41.3 percent shooting and 89.3 points during the streak entering Wednesday’s game), sharing the ball (“When someone isn’t hitting, we have been finding someone else to step in,” he says.) and becoming accustomed to Adelman’s system (“We had new players, a new coach and a new system,” Scola says. “It was only a matter of time before we started coming together”).

Scola may be an NBA rookie, but he is no stranger to success in pro hoops. He was MVP last summer at the Tournament of Americas, despite Argentina’s loss to the U.S. in the championship. He was the leading scorer for gold medal-winning Argentina at the 2004 Olympics. He twice was named the Spanish League MVP during his seven seasons with Tau Ceramica.

Though this is his first year living in America, Scola has no trouble communicating in English. Check his answer to a question I asked him Wednesday morning, and you can see he has learned to handle potentially sticky questions from the media.

Me: “Which would mean more, winning the Finals or Olympic gold this summer?”

Scola: “I want to win both.”

The way the Rockets are going since Scola became a starter, he certainly has an opportunity for at least one of the two.

ArkadiosV2
03-13-2008, 06:15 PM
He's averaging 9.2 points and 5.7 rebounds, but probably a lot more the past month or so.
He averaged 11.8 pts, 7.3 reb in the past month...

mvblair
03-13-2008, 07:29 PM
He averaged 11.8 pts, 7.3 reb in the past month...
Huh. Well.

OK, so it's not a lot more...:o

mvblair
04-26-2009, 03:21 PM
Great article about Luis Scola.

Scola Continues to Stand Tall (http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/news;_ylt=AkcyithN_Jf.bTIX8P_hppG8vLYF?slug=ys-blazersrockets042509&prov=yhoo&type=lgns) - April 25, 2009, Yahoo! Sports, by Fran Blinebury

Never mind the Alamo.

The San Antonio Spurs will always remember Luis Scola.

As the one that got away.

While the Spurs are currently playing the role of the pińata in their series with the Dallas Mavericks, Scola might now be the big stick for the Houston Rockets.

On another night when the Portland Trail Blazers did everything but erect a defensive wall around Yao Ming, it was Scola who allowed the Rockets to tunnel their way out for an 86-83 win and a 2-1 lead in their best-of-seven Western Conference playoff series.

“It is nothing special, nothing where you say that you are going to try to win the game by yourself,” Scola said. “It is just about trying to read the different situations and play the game the way it is supposed to be played.”

When all of the preseason hype about the Rockets talked about the construction of the “Big Three,” nobody ever mentioned Scola’s name. It was the Yao Ming-Tracy McGrady-Ron Artest confluence that was supposed to build the Rockets a tower to the sky.

Yet it’s been Scola who has been the foundation from the very first day. It is his hustle, his determination, his professionalism that stands out on most nights. And it was his willingness to take and make the jump shots Portland offered that enabled the Rockets to regain their confidence on their home floor.

After being burned by a monster game from Yao-zilla as the Rockets cruised to an easy win in the series opener, the Blazers have been determined not to let that happen again. So they started the past two games with Joel Przybilla using his bulk and strength to push Yao around in the low post and then brought Greg Oden off the bench to front him. Sometimes they even use a Twin Towers alignment to practically put Yao in a vise.

The upshot was that from the opening minutes of Game 3, Scola found himself wide open around the key, challenged to take the shot. He made four in the first quarter alone to get the Rockets rolling, and perhaps it was his willingness to step into the breach that emboldened Shane Battier to pump in 16 points, including a pair of late, clutch 3-pointers, and Carl Landry to score 10 points of his own.

“Luis has played in enough big games internationally all around the world that I don’t think he’s ever going to be shy about taking the big shots,” Battier said. “He might not be the focal point of our offense every night, but we all know what he’s capable of doing.”

Through all of the early season turmoil – the injuries, the lineup changes, the disappointing losses – Scola kept his head down and his energy up. And on Friday it was fitting that he lifted the Rockets on a night when they needed a boost.

The Blazers again kept Yao quiet with just seven points on 2-for-7 shooting. And Artest inexplicably did not try a shot in the first half and finished only 3 for 8 with nine points.

But never mind those struggles or puzzles. Scola, as he’s done all season, had their backs.

His 19 points, nine rebounds came up just short of his 29th double-double of the season. It was the kind of come-to-work-every-night effort that won him the MVP of the Tournament of the Americas pre-Olympic qualifying tournament in 2007, and then made him the anchor of Argentina’s injury-riddled, undermanned bronze medal team at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.

There are Swiss watches that don’t run this steady. Scola was a difference-maker.

That’s exactly what the Rockets wanted from him when they made the deal with the Spurs in July of 2007 and that’s exactly what the Spurs let slip through their fingers.

San Antonio general manager R.C. Buford must swallow his tongue every time Scola has another of these games. These were all the plays that Scola was supposed to be making for the Spurs after they drafted him in the second round back in 2002.

But after striking it rich with Manu Ginobili, the Spurs – usually the smartest guys in the room – could never find a way to bring his Argentina teammate into their championship fold. They dawdled as he signed a contract extension in Spain, where he was an MVP. They settled for a lesser version of him when they signed, then re-signed Fabricio Oberto.

When the Spurs gave away Scola two summers ago, they rationalized that they had Tiago Splitter coming along in their system and they were unburdening themselves of Jackie Butler’s contract.

What they were really doing was maybe costing themselves a shot at one or two more championship trophies to go with their collection that already numbers four. Could you imagine Scola in a lineup that already includes Parker and Tim Duncan? That whole never-won-back-to-back bugaboo might have long ago been moot.

The Spurs’ loss is the Rockets’ gain. At $3.1 million this season and $3.3 million next season, there might not be a better buy in the entire NBA than Scola

As the playoffs go on, there might be other games when Yao gets no more than seven shots, when the enigma that is Artest throws another curve or the young lightning bolt, Aaron Brooks, explodes to grab front and center in the photo.

When that happens, remember to look down below, where Luis Scola is holding all of them on his back.

jugoplastika
04-28-2009, 09:32 AM
Article about Yao Ming and Luis Scola.
Basically repeats what all the (knowledgable) fans already have been saying.


Houston's Figure Four

April 27, 2009 3:44 AM
Posted by Kevin Arnovitz

After getting burned by Yao Ming for seven field goals in the first quarter of Game One, Portland has shifted its defensive course, devoting a lot more attention to Yao ever since. For most of the past three games, Portland has deployed what Doug Collins referred to Sunday night as a "sandwich” – one defender fronting Yao (usually Portland's center, Joel Przybilla or Greg Oden), and one playing behind him on the block (usually the power forward, LaMarcus Aldridge). Even when that sandwich has been open-faced, Aldridge hasn't veered too far away from Yao down low.

The strategy has allowed the Blazers to contain Yao reasonably well (14 FGMs in the past 15 quarters), but it puts a lot of pressure on the rest of Portland's defense. With Steve Blake picking up Aaron Brooks as the Rockets get into the offense, that leaves only two Portland defenders to essentially zone up on the remaining three Rockets -- one of which is Houston's power forward, Luis Scola (and his backup, Carl Landry).

Scola and Landry teamed up for ten buckets Sunday night, the majority of which were the direct result of Portland's defensive focus on Yao. This left the Houston 4s to find space and opportunities on the floor to make the Blazers pay.

Here's a sampling of the kinds of shots Scola was able to get and convert Sunday night:

[1st Quarter, 3:54 mark] This basket occurs in transition, but it still gets to the heart of the dynamic with Yao. On the defensive end, Yao pokes the ball away from Greg Oden on the left block. This ignites the break for Houston. Incredibly, Yao is the first man down the court for the Rockets, and he's open for business on the right block before the Blazers defense can get set. Brandon Roy is the first on the scene. He covers the entry angle into Yao until Portland's big men arrive on the scene. Roy's presence is enough to deter Aaron Brooks, who opts to pass the ball off to a trailing Ron Artest. There have been several instances during this series when, guided by my own prejudice, I assume Artest will muck up a perfectly good opportunity with an ill-advised chuck, but he's been relatively temperate. To that effect, Artest wisely returns the ball to Brooks in the right corner. Both Oden and Aldridge have caught up to the play, and both frantically find Yao as Brooks slings a baseline pass into Yao beneath the basket. Unfortunately for the Blazers, neither big man accounts for Scola, who is left by himself on the left block. Scola makes it easy for Yao, by diving to the rack. Yao hits him on arrival for the layup.

There are plenty of third/fourth offensive options in the league whose livelihoods depend on the disproportionate amount of attention given to their star teammates, but few tandems have developed the telepathy that Yao and Scola have over the past few months. Since Tracy McGrady's departure from the Rockets' lineup this winter, Scola has mastered the art of understanding precisely where he should be to take maximum advantage of Yao's presence -- not only in the halfcourt, but even on the break. Credit Yao for knowing how to capitalize on Scola's resourcefulness.


[3rd Quarter, 6:43 mark] The trap on Yao doesn't always come from the Blazers' 4. Here, Travis Outlaw -- who is covering Artest -- joins Joel Przybilla to trap Yao along the right side of the baseline. They've got Yao locked up and will get a hard-earned defensive stop if they can sustain the heat. Battier is directly behind Yao in the right corner, guarded by Roy. That leaves Steve Blake and Aldridge to patrol the rest of the court. It's a gamble by Portland. You admire the pressure they're applying by smothering Yao in the baseline, but their tactic doesn't come without risk.

Sure enough, Scola darts his way over toward Yao, then squeezes past Blake to set up beneath the right edge of the backboard. Scola is now in position to be on the receiving end of a treacherous pass from Yao along the baseline. Aldridge contests Scola's layup attempt, but Scola dekes him with a little upfake. The Yao-Scola symbiosis is evident again.


[3rd Quarter, 3:47 mark; 4th Quarter, 6:37 mark] Houston doesn't have a lineup of dynamic scorers who can create shots out of thin air. When the Rockets succeed in halfcourt, it's generally because they work the margins of a possession -- "take what the defense gives 'em," in the parlance of color commentary. It's unlikely that Portland wants Luis Scola shooting open jumpers from 17 feet (whereas they're probably okay with Ron Artest launching from 25 with a defender in close proximity). They've made a calculation based on two undesirable choices: Guarding Yao one-on-one underneath, or giving Scola more room than he should rightfully have.

These two buckets are near-perfect illustrations of the price the Blazers are paying. Both come fairly early in the possession, at :15 and :20 on the shot clock respectively. The first comes on a drive-and-dish initiated by Aaron Brooks. Aldridge has opted to stick closer to Yao (directly underneath) than to Scola (along the baseline to the right side). As Brooks enters the lane, he kicks the ball over to Scola, who nails the open 17-footer.

It's difficult to fault Aldridge here, because he's abiding by Portland's defensive strategy. The same holds true in the fourth quarter on an inbounds play. The Blazers are sandwiching Yao along the baseline. The ball goes into Battier, who wastes no time in passing it over to Scola at the top of the key. There isn't a Blazer in close proximity to contest Scola.

If Houston ultimately prevails in this series, Scola's ability to hit the open 15-to-18 foot jumper that Portland is ceding him will be among the primary factors. So far, Scola has drained 14 of his 27 shot attempts from mid-range.
It would be unfair to ignore Carl Landry's fourth quarter basket at the 2:30 mark that gives the Rockets a four-point lead. Much like Scola, Landry finds himself unmanned by the Blazers, and flashes to the top of the key where he gets an identical pass from Battier.

Landry's shot is huge -- as are Scola's -- and it goes to underscore how important the 4 is in the Rockets' offense. So long as Yao serves as the focal point of the opposing defense, Houston's power forward is in the spotlight. How well he cuts, shoots, and uses all that open space the defense gives him will go a long way toward determining how far into spring the Rockets will be playing this year.

http://myespn.go.com/blogs/truehoop/0-39-133/Houston-s-Figure-Four.html

mvblair
04-28-2009, 03:22 PM
Good article, Plastica. Thanks for posting it.

Scola is much, much more skilled than Landry. I think it's glaring the difference in their skill. However, Landry more than makes up for his lack of skill with his incredible hustle. The guy must be drinking 5 RedBulls before games. You've got to love both those players.

jugoplastika
05-15-2009, 03:09 PM
Scola led the Rockets with 24 points and 12 rebounds. Game 7 will decide which team will have the opportunity to battle Denver.

http://www.interbasket.net/news/2244/2009/05/15/luis-scola-aaron-brooks-lead-rockets-over-lakers/

mvblair
05-15-2009, 04:14 PM
Scola led the Rockets with 24 points and 12 rebounds. Game 7 will decide which team will have the opportunity to battle Denver.

http://www.interbasket.net/news/2244/2009/05/15/luis-scola-aaron-brooks-lead-rockets-over-lakers/ I got to watch the first half. I think that when the Rockets had 17 points and the Lakers had 1, Scola had scored 12 points. He was an absolute wonder in the post. He works his shoulder fakes so well. Seriously, he'd be an All-Star if he played like that in the first three games of the season when the All-Star vote happens.

jugoplastika
05-15-2009, 05:12 PM
He works his shoulder fakes so well.

Yep... Add his footwork to this. Scola (plus Melo and Bosh) have incredible footwork, they are better than the rest.


Seriously, he'd be an All-Star if he played like that in the first three games of the season when the All-Star vote happens.

He is already an All-Star in my eyes all past years.:)



Scola breaks ice early in Game 6

Forward helps Rockets jump out to early advantage by scoring 14 in first quarter

By JOSEPH DUARTE
May 15, 2009, 12:47AM

Luis Scola made a spin move to his right that completely fooled Lamar Odom in the first quarter Thursday night.

Scola was just warming up.

By the time the first quarter ended, Scola had nearly outscored the Los Angeles Lakers by himself.

“He was in attack mode,” Rockets guard Aaron Brooks said. “He set the tone.”

Scola gave the Rockets an early jump-start and finished with a playoff career-high 24 points and had 12 rebounds as the Rockets beat the Lakers 95-80 in Game 6 at Toyota Center.

“Yao (Ming) is out and there’s a lot of shots to go around for everyone else,” said Scola, who was 10-of-17 from the floor. “Someone will have to shoot them. Sometimes it’s me. Sometimes it’s Shane (Battier). Sometimes it’s Aaron. Sometimes it’s somebody else. Today, it happened to be me.”

Scola hit 6-of-9 shots for 14 points in the first quarter as the Rockets raced to a 27-15 lead.

“Luis Scola was incredible,” Rockets coach Rick Adelman said. “He just got us going.”

Brooks said Scola provided a low-post presence that was missing in Game 5, a 118-78 thrashing that put the Rockets on the verge of elimination.

“We established him at the beginning of the game,” Brooks said. “He did a great job. That’s when it all started by establishing him and getting some easy buckets in the paint.”

In the previous five games against the Lakers in the Western Conference semifinals, Scola’s previous high was 12 points. He reached that total midway through the first quarter, spinning and shaking his way underneath the basket.

Scola scored the Rockets’ first six points, including a turnaround hook-shot that banked off the glass.

Later in the quarter Scola made another spin move, this time faking out Lamar Odom, and on the next trip down the floor completely faked Gasol, making a quick right fake before turning to his left for a layup that put the Rockets ahead 17-1.

Scola wasn’t finished.

He finished the first quarter with another right-left move to fool a Lakers defender and an 18-foot jumper from the top of the key.

When the Lakers started to double-team Scola after the first quarter that opened up more shots for the guards, Brooks said.

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/sports/6425194.html

14 in 1st quarter. Can't wait to see Game 7.

jugoplastika
05-18-2009, 05:51 PM
Bad game for Luis Scola and his teammates. Rockets' players were outrebounded, they had no flow to their offense, took too many quick shots, and there wasn’t enough ball movement to get others in position to make plays, as the article says. I agree completely. Congrats for great fight and big heart.:)


Commentary: No moral victory for Rockets

By RICHARD JUSTICE Copyright 2009 Houston Chronicle
May 17, 2009, 11:14PM

LOS ANGELES — When he was asked about pride and intangibles and all that stuff, Luis Scola shook his head.

“No,” he said quietly.

He didn’t want to hear another word about how much the Rockets had accomplished, how they were undersized and outmanned or how they showed so much heart, grit and determination.

Someday, he’ll look back at this remarkable season and feel nothing but pride at all the Rockets accomplished.

...

On this long, bitter afternoon, on a day when the Rockets were dominated from start to finish, when all their weaknesses were sliced open and exposed, Scola was dealing with other emotions.

“Now it’s hard because we just lost,” he said. “I think in a couple of days, a couple of weeks we’re all going to be happy with what we achieved.”

He was sitting in a locker room that cleared out quickly, a locker room in which questions were answered quietly and succinctly.

After the Lakers got going, the Rockets never came close to getting back in the game. Scola said it had nothing to do with energy or effort.

“No, no, no,” he said. “No energy level. We played hard. They just played better. No excuses. They just outplayed us today. You got to be ready to compete against anybody. Sooner or later, good things will happen.”

...

This time, there was no Landry or Battier or Scola to take up the slack. The Lakers got rolling, and they could have dialed up almost any score they chose.

...


http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/sports/bk/bkn/6428725.html

mvblair
05-18-2009, 11:15 PM
Bad game for Luis Scola and his teammates. Rockets' players were outrebounded, they had no flow to their offense, took too many quick shots, and there wasn’t enough ball movement to get others in position to make plays, as the article says. I agree completely. Congrats for great fight and big heart.:)



http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/sports/bk/bkn/6428725.htmlThanks for posting the article.

Looking back at Scola's season, I think it's true that he has not improved a whole lot since he left Spain. I mean, he's basically the same player, just in a different league. He has the same incredible skills, just in a different league. Great season, great heart from Scola and all the Rockets.