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bobo81
08-21-2006, 01:06 PM
I see so many people from different parts of the world on here...I thought of making a thread where we can ask them for phrases in their language, or even translation.

Here it is :cool:

ziv
08-21-2006, 03:09 PM
btw - bobo do you speak arabic? is it possible that arabic is the third most common spoken language here (behind english and spanish)?

bobo81
08-21-2006, 04:19 PM
Hi ziv, Im an english speaker sorry dude...American in Qatar, not the other way around ;) But I think madarin (?) is the 3rd largest...Not sure though

ziv
08-21-2006, 04:27 PM
mmm - i meant here in interbasket...
there are some chinese but not that many around here.

Juan Carlos Nadal
08-21-2006, 04:38 PM
Arabic third in IBN? I seriously doubt it. That's probably Lithuanian (if not 2nd). I am not aware of that many arab forumers here. Hebrew and even Greek should be above Arabic...

ziv
08-21-2006, 05:40 PM
well - that's the three largest groups here. there some slovenian and i would have asked - what about serbo-croatian but beside the slovenian and very few serbian here they aren't that many.
i still guess spanish is the second language eventhough there aren't many spaniards and not too many latin american guys - but still i guess even some american and european ppl study it as 2-3 language.
arabic is sometime mandatory as a third language in certain schools in israel (at least until age of 15-16). i personally speak arabic due the school and some minor courses i took in the university (and outside the university). that's why i though it might be popular here.

bobo81
08-21-2006, 07:05 PM
Forgive me for my ignorance but how different is the languages of Lithuanian, Slovenian and Serbian? Is it like Portuguese and Spanish where they can understand a lot of it?

PHILIPeurobasket
08-21-2006, 07:14 PM
Forgive me for my ignorance but how different is the languages of Lithuanian, Slovenian and Serbian? Is it like Portuguese and Spanish where they can understand a lot of it?

That same different in American and Polish languages ...

elaj
08-21-2006, 07:19 PM
Forgive me for my ignorance but how different is the languages of Lithuanian, Slovenian and Serbian? Is it like Portuguese and Spanish where they can understand a lot of it?
Slovenian and Serbian is quite similar, well, atleast most of Slovenians understand also Serbian (Croatian, Bosnian). Also because we lived in one country for a while (Yugoslavia).

Difference between Lithuanian and Slovenian or Serbian is quite big, because Lithuanian language isn't slavic like Slovenian, Serbian, Croatian, Russian...etc.

Delk
08-21-2006, 07:20 PM
The different between American and English language?


:) :)

PHILIPeurobasket
08-21-2006, 07:23 PM
The different between American and English language?

Times and accent - and only this...

elaj
08-21-2006, 07:24 PM
The different between American and English language?


:) :)
There is. The difference is in some words (spelling) and mostly in pronounciation. ;)

Juan Carlos Nadal
08-21-2006, 07:49 PM
Not to mention Scottish English...

Has anyone ever tried to read Trainspotting in its original format?

Kooaletey! Ef ya ken what ah mein, likesay. Keweler than aw ra reist.

Delk
08-21-2006, 07:51 PM
Not to mention Scottish English...

Has anyone ever tried to read Trainspotting in its original format?

Kooaletey! Ef ya ken what ah mein, likesay. Keweler than aw ra reist.


This is slang?

elaj
08-21-2006, 07:53 PM
This is slang?
That's Scottish English. :D

Aye, JCN? :D

Juan Carlos Nadal
08-21-2006, 07:54 PM
Combination of slang with heavily altered pronounciation of standard english words.


That's Scottish English. :D

Aye, JCN? :D

Aye, mate. Couldnae huv seid et beitter missel.

bobo81
08-22-2006, 12:53 PM
So how do you guys say "Hello" in your languages (along with pronounciation) ? :D

Juan Carlos Nadal
08-22-2006, 01:42 PM
So how do you guys say "Hello" in your languages (along with pronounciation) ? :D

Bulgarian: Zdrave (ZDRAH-veh) or Zdrasti (ZDRAH-stee)
Scots: Howdy (Hah-OO-dee)
Welsh: Bore da (BOH-reh dah) or Hylo (Hee-LOO)
Greek: Geia (Ghee-AH)
Lith: Labas

as for spanish, italian, french and the like you must already know... :)

YYY
08-22-2006, 02:09 PM
Lithuanian: labas (lah-bahs) or sveikas (swey-kah-s)
Polish: czesc (chess-c)
Russian: privet (pree-wet)

I love english pronunciation "hints", I have always found them so funny, especially when someone is trying to write the pronunciation for "Jasikevičius" or any other "strange" Lithuanian name. By the way I have no idea if the pronunciation I wrote for those words is correct.

re5pectas
08-22-2006, 02:29 PM
Lithuanian: labas (lah-bahs) or sveikas (swey-kah-s)
Polish: czesc (chess-c)
Russian: privet (pree-wet)

I love english pronunciation "hints", I have always found them so funny, especially when someone is trying to write the pronunciation for "Jasikevičius" or any other "strange" Lithuanian name. By the way I have no idea if the pronunciation I wrote for those words is correct.
Hmmm... (lah-bahs), (swey-kah-s)... interesting :)
I always thought that it's easier for foreigners just to reed it, like it is. At least "labas" they learn fast :)


Arabic third in IBN? I seriously doubt it. That's probably Lithuanian (if not 2nd). I am not aware of that many arab forumers here. Hebrew and even Greek should be above Arabic...
I second U, actually I would like to see it statistically, maybe Stuart or some1 else could make such statistics :rolleyes:

PHILIPeurobasket
08-22-2006, 06:34 PM
In polish language hello is "czesc", and for example good morning is "dzien dobry" :)

qiangdade
08-23-2006, 10:14 AM
greek: geia (ghiA) or geia sou (ghiA su)
german: hallo or hi
spanish: hola (Ola)
english: oi (lol!)
czech: ahoy (ahOy)
chinese: ni hao (pronounciation too difficult to describe due to the various stresses)

YYY
08-23-2006, 11:15 AM
english: oi (lol!)
That's is a strange way to say "oi". Do you pronounce "hello" as "lmao"? :D

PHILIPeurobasket
08-23-2006, 12:37 PM
english: oi (lol!)

"oi" !? :confused:

Digdis
08-23-2006, 01:20 PM
english: oi (lol!)

What's there to understand?
U.S. English - Yo!
U.K. English (as they drive on the wrong side) - Oi!

D.

elaj
08-23-2006, 01:47 PM
Slovenia: Živjo (Zhivjo) - something like hello, Dober dan (Doober dan) - good day :rolleyes:

qiangdade
08-24-2006, 12:09 PM
"oi" !? :confused:


it's slang. Don't get confused

rikhardur
08-24-2006, 11:33 PM
Portuguese:
- hello: Olá
- good morning: Bom dia
- thanks: Obrigado, if a man says it, Obrigada if a woman.
- yes: Sim
- no: Năo

A Portuguese understands a Spaniard who speaks Castillian or Galician quite well. As for Catalan it is a bit more difficult. It is said that Spaniards don't understand Portuguese quite as well and that that has to due with the Portuguese sounds of vowels especially; they have a different sound according to its place in a word. For example an "o" can sound as an open "o", "u" or "ot" as in the French name "Junot". Due to this, some vowels are almost mute (it happens a lot with "a") and barely pronounced, which to some extent makes some words seem without vowels. I believe that's why some Spaniards don't understand Portuguese that well, since if a Portuguese speaks Portuguese with all the vowels open (as Spanish has) the Spaniard will understand a bit more :D
I personally understand a great deal of Italian, especially written, and I guess that also happens with the Portuguese generally. The same applies to the other Romanic languages I believe, being French after Spanish and Italian in understanding and Romanian the hardest one.

adebisi
08-25-2006, 06:21 AM
"Anyone wishing to hear how Indo-Europeans spoke should come and listen to a Lithuanian peasant.” - Antoine Meillet

rikhardur
08-25-2006, 10:53 AM
"Anyone wishing to hear how Indo-Europeans spoke should come and listen to a Lithuanian peasant.” - Antoine Meillet
That's quite true, Lithuanian is one of the oldest languages in the world, and changed little compared to other languages (in Europe at least). It is often compared to Icelandic in that sense, although Icelandic is much closer to its "original", resembling very much the language of the Sagas (10th and early 11th centuries) for example; an Icelandic can read them nowadays with no special effort.

King Bowser Koopa
08-25-2006, 12:41 PM
English/ Spanish

J.Johnson is having a tough time guarding Navarro/ Navarro se está meando en Joe Johnson.

Dwight Howard has not the best FT shooting percentage/ Dwight Howard no la mete ni al arco iris.

Good move by Sergio Rodríguez/ ˇˇˇJUGÓN!!!!

Elton Brand tries to score over Pau Gasol./ Elton Brand se lleva un pincho de merluza de Pau Gasol.

Lebron James shooting has been kind of streaky tonight/ Lebron James es un camelo.

rikhardur
08-25-2006, 01:00 PM
English/ Spanish

J.Johnson is having a tough time guarding Navarro/ Navarro se está meando en Joe Johnson.

Dwight Howard has not the best FT shooting percentage/ Dwight Howard no la mete ni al arco iris.

Good move by Sergio Rodríguez/ ˇˇˇJUGÓN!!!!

Elton Brand tries to score over Pau Gasol./ Elton Brand se lleva un pincho de merluza de Pau Gasol.

Lebron James shooting has been kind of streaky tonight/ Lebron James es un camelo.
Nice translations you got there :D

Jan van Grabski
08-25-2006, 03:24 PM
Dear polish posters (woma, philip, someone else) - can you tell me if the word "budrus" means anything in polish language ? :) tnx.

qiangdade
08-26-2006, 02:14 PM
dear lith posters, can u tell me what the word "comandas" means. I hear it constantly when watching downloaded games in lithuanian

YYY
08-26-2006, 02:23 PM
komanda, komandos - team, teams

PHILIPeurobasket
08-26-2006, 08:26 PM
Dear polish posters (woma, philip, someone else) - can you tell me if the word "budrus" means anything in polish language ? :) tnx.

Budrus !? I didnt know what mean this word, I never didnt hear about it ...:confused:

Digdis
08-27-2006, 07:44 AM
English/ Spanish

J.Johnson is having a tough time guarding Navarro/ Navarro se está meando en Joe Johnson.

Dwight Howard has not the best FT shooting percentage/ Dwight Howard no la mete ni al arco iris.

Good move by Sergio Rodríguez/ ˇˇˇJUGÓN!!!!

Elton Brand tries to score over Pau Gasol./ Elton Brand se lleva un pincho de merluza de Pau Gasol.

Lebron James shooting has been kind of streaky tonight/ Lebron James es un camelo.
:D
Kind of reminds of the English-Hungarian dictionary sketch by Monty Python.

Billy
08-27-2006, 09:40 AM
That's quite true, Lithuanian is one of the oldest languages in the world, and changed little compared to other languages (in Europe at least). It is often compared to Icelandic in that sense, although Icelandic is much closer to its "original", resembling very much the language of the Sagas (10th and early 11th centuries) for example; an Icelandic can read them nowadays with no special effort.

Icelandic is weird and fascinating to me. It is like the Scandinavian languages once was.
I have no problems understadning Danish (as long as they are not from Copenhagen) or Norwegian but Icelandic is very hard. Icelandic people I have met have no problem understanding me though or picking up a rather academic level of Swedish in a short time, something I dont think I would be able to at all.

I have done quite a bit of work with immigrants and exchange students and the ones who has been able to pick up Swedish the fastest (outside of Danes-Norwegians) are definitely the Germans and the Dutch. I suppose it has to do with the roots of the Scandinavian languages.
I have also come across alot of Finns (mandatory Swedish studies in highschool) and Latvians who speak Swedish with a very interesting and exotic accent (perfectly understandable though).
I also had a Lithuanian student in my business law class (taught in Swedish) who spoke almost perfect Swedish and passed the course without problems. I never asked him where he picked up Swedish though, can you study Swedish in Lithuanian highschools?

PHILIPeurobasket
08-27-2006, 09:54 AM
Some peoples write on board "Polen" - "Polen" is in German language, in English we have "Poland" or "Polish" ...

sinobball
08-30-2006, 09:28 PM
If you noticed the problem many Asian people face (see China_Team, that's me 5 years ago) in learning English, it tells you one thing only: English is so unnecessarily difficult!

"She likes me a lot."

Why not "She likes I"? Nobody will confuse this with "I like she." Why invent "me", "her" and all the unnecessary terms? And why not "She like me"? why the "s"? To me it never makes the sentence any clearer. And why "a lot" not "lot"? What does the "a" do? Why is "a lot" OK but not "a much"?

That's why Chinese is so easy. Every word is necessary :)

rikhardur
08-30-2006, 09:39 PM
If you noticed the problem many Asian people face (see China_Team, that's me 5 years ago) in learning English, it tells you one thing only: English is so unnecessarily difficult!

"She likes me a lot."

Why not "She likes I"? Nobody will confuse this with "I like she." Why invent "me", "her" and all the unnecessary terms? And why not "She like me"? why the "s"? To me it never makes the sentence any clearer. And why "a lot" not "lot"? What does the "a" do? Why is "a lot" OK but not "a much"?

That's why Chinese is so easy. Every word is necessary :)
The explanation for that goes way deep into lingustics, it would take a VERY LONG post to explain it. It has to do with language cases (which is typical in German for instance), verbal endings and the verb movement in a sentence I believe. A very mathematical thing, it's hard to explain here.

adebisi
08-30-2006, 09:40 PM
can you study Swedish in Lithuanian highschools?

No we can't. Usually in highschools we can study english, german, russian, french and sometimes (very rare) spain languages. If you want to study some "exotic" language (swedish is included) you must enter Vilnius Pedagogical University. But in some cases then you want to learn only exceptional "exotic" language, you can be forced to wait for few years.
As for myself... few years ago, before going to study in Portugal, I was trying to find some courses of portuguese language here in Vilnius city, but I failed :rolleyes:

rikhardur
08-30-2006, 09:46 PM
As for myself... few years ago, before going to study in Portugal, I was trying to find some courses of portuguese language here in Vilnius city, but I failed :rolleyes:
I guess you learn a lot more vocabulary and speaking easiness when going to a country, instead of learning it in a room, even with a native teacher. Of course the writing won't be that good, but with some effort it'll improve :)
I have some friends that went to Germany with Erasmus programme, they were crap talking German and not that good writing. When they came back they could talk very fluently, with minor grammar errors and their writing improved very much.

adebisi
08-31-2006, 05:27 AM
I guess you learn a lot more vocabulary and speaking easiness when going to a country, instead of learning it in a room, even with a native teacher. Of course the writing won't be that good, but with some effort it'll improve :)
I have some friends that went to Germany with Erasmus programme, they were crap talking German and not that good writing. When they came back they could talk very fluently, with minor grammar errors and their writing improved very much.

That's absolutely true. But if I have had portuguese basics before going to Portugal, it would be much more easy and fast to begin to understand and even to talk this language. Becouse I knew only one word (obrigado) before going threre. But I think portuguese is one of the easiest languages along with spanish. :)

rikhardur
08-31-2006, 02:50 PM
That's absolutely true. But if I have had portuguese basics before going to Portugal, it would be much more easy and fast to begin to understand and even to talk this language. Becouse I knew only one word (obrigado) before going threre. But I think portuguese is one of the easiest languages along with spanish. :)
I bet Lithuanian is more difficult :D
I guess that Finnish is probably the most difficult language in Europe.

elaj
08-31-2006, 03:06 PM
Slovenian is one of the most difficult languages in the World. :rolleyes:

bobo81
08-31-2006, 03:27 PM
I think the most difficult languages are those which use different letters like Chinese, Tamil etc...

rikhardur
08-31-2006, 03:33 PM
I think the most difficult languages are those which use different letters like Chinese, Tamil etc...
Perhaps not, I mean, a different alphabet or different characters are always a bit hard to learn, but then the structure of the language might be simple. I don't have knowledge of Chinese or other Asian languages though.

qiangdade
08-31-2006, 03:44 PM
If you noticed the problem many Asian people face (see China_Team, that's me 5 years ago) in learning English, it tells you one thing only: English is so unnecessarily difficult!

"She likes me a lot."

Why not "She likes I"? Nobody will confuse this with "I like she." Why invent "me", "her" and all the unnecessary terms? And why not "She like me"? why the "s"? To me it never makes the sentence any clearer. And why "a lot" not "lot"? What does the "a" do? Why is "a lot" OK but not "a much"?

That's why Chinese is so easy. Every word is necessary :)

Chinese talking about how easy a language should be. LMAO!!! U need 3000 characters just to read a newspaper. I agree that chinese grammar is the easiest that i have encounterd though. The ideal would be pinyin chinese

Levenspiel
08-31-2006, 05:39 PM
My former Russian room-mate said Turkish was an easy language, and he proved his point by talking it almost perfectly. But I noticed the foreigners can never learn the differences between our two past tenses (similar to past & perfect tenses in English, but ours are funnier when misused:)).

I guess our language has big resemblances to Japanese and Chinese. It's not surprising considering that once we were neighbors. But, people say that Turkish and Finnish has some resemblances, too :eek: In fact, a Finnish friend had confirmed this. Both tongues belong to the same big language-group, I guess.


Simple greeting/etiquette words in Turkish are usually borrowed from either Persian or Arabian (due to the religion and Ottoman policy). For example:

Hello: Merhaba or Selam.
Thanks: Tesekkürler

Other simple expressions:

Yes: Evet
No: Hayir
Good Morning: Günaydin

But the grammar is protected, and it's totally different from Arabic or Persian. Only their words were present, but after the language reform in 1920s, those were cleaned in great proportion, too. However, there's a religion and 700 years of history factor that does not allow a total cleansing. Well, I'd rather have them instead of English/French words, infesting everywhere recently :rolleyes:

bobo81
08-31-2006, 06:21 PM
All those languages with that Arabic type of writing like Urdu and Farsi are pretty straightforward and easy to learn. But languages like Korean, which was just made up and each letter consists of many different dots and ticks, is crazy! I think they can make up to 300 or more different letters...Or something like that I heard :confused:

hagakure
08-31-2006, 06:36 PM
Not to mention Scottish English...

Has anyone ever tried to read Trainspotting in its original format?

Kooaletey! Ef ya ken what ah mein, likesay. Keweler than aw ra reist.

I actually have read Trainspotting. I didn't really have any problems understand it to honest but it was rather amusing

hagakure
08-31-2006, 06:37 PM
Bulgarian: Zdrave (ZDRAH-veh) or Zdrasti (ZDRAH-stee)
Scots: Howdy (Hah-OO-dee)
Welsh: Bore da (BOH-reh dah) or Hylo (Hee-LOO)
Greek: Geia (Ghee-AH)
Lith: Labas

as for spanish, italian, french and the like you must already know... :)

Actually Geia in greek sounds like "Ya"

hagakure
08-31-2006, 06:41 PM
That's quite true, Lithuanian is one of the oldest languages in the world, and changed little compared to other languages (in Europe at least). It is often compared to Icelandic in that sense, although Icelandic is much closer to its "original", resembling very much the language of the Sagas (10th and early 11th centuries) for example; an Icelandic can read them nowadays with no special effort.

That's interesting and frankly I didn't know that.

Modern Greek is also very similar to Ancient Greek. Most greek people can more or less understand something that is written in ancient greek even if some of the words have changed.

hagakure
08-31-2006, 06:48 PM
If you noticed the problem many Asian people face (see China_Team, that's me 5 years ago) in learning English, it tells you one thing only: English is so unnecessarily difficult!

"She likes me a lot."

Why not "She likes I"? Nobody will confuse this with "I like she." Why invent "me", "her" and all the unnecessary terms? And why not "She like me"? why the "s"? To me it never makes the sentence any clearer. And why "a lot" not "lot"? What does the "a" do? Why is "a lot" OK but not "a much"?

That's why Chinese is so easy. Every word is necessary :)

I can understand that. Basically, chinese like other non-european languages have a totally different structure. Also, the fact that you use different characters for your language makes it more difficult to learn foreign languages. It's also more difficult for people from other cultures to learn your language for the same reason. Personally, I have never studied chinese, but I have stupied japenese which is just as difficult and it took me a whole semester to get used to simple concepts that were totally foreign to me.
The thing with english is that everyone watches american movies or visits to internet, which makes it much easier to learn to use the language. I have noticed though that people from scandinavian countries or the Netherlands have less difficulties learning english, because their languages are so similar.

Joško Poljak Fan
08-31-2006, 07:04 PM
chinese grammar might be simple, but pronounciation is far from simple to me...

PHILIPeurobasket
08-31-2006, 07:07 PM
Some Polish words :) :

Hello - CZESC
Whats up? - CO SLYCHAC?
Where is ... - GDZIE JEST ...
What is you name? - JAK MASZ NA IMIE?
What time is now? - KTÓRA JEST GODZINA?
Good morning - DZIEN DOBRY
Left - LEWO
Right - PRAWO
Street - ULICA
Number - NUMER
How much cost... - ILE TO KOSZTUJE...

bobo81
08-31-2006, 10:22 PM
Some Polish words :) :

Hello - CZESC
Whats up? - CO SLYCHAC?
Where is ... - GDZIE JEST ...
What is you name? - JAK MASZ NA IMIE?
What time is now? - KTÓRA JEST GODZINA?
Good morning - DZIEN DOBRY
Left - LEWO
Right - PRAWO
Street - ULICA
Number - NUMER
How much cost... - ILE TO KOSZTUJE...

Cool..but please tell us how we pronounce these :)

rikhardur
09-01-2006, 12:23 AM
But, people say that Turkish and Finnish has some resemblances, too :eek: In fact, a Finnish friend had confirmed this. Both tongues belong to the same big language-group, I guess.
They actually belong to different groups. Finnish belongs to the Uralic group (as well as Estonian, Hungarian, Sami and many other languages spoken especially in northern Russia) and Turkish belongs to the Altaic group (along with Turkmen, Kyrgyz, Mongolian and others).

However, there have been theories that merge those two branches under the designation Ural-Altaic languages, but there has not yet been unarguably proved that there's a link between them, although they actually have things in common (for instance, agglutination, vowel harmony, no grammatical gender and SOV (subject-object-verb) word order).

That attempt to merge those two groups has had also political motivations over the years, with little base on scientific evidence. There's still a great discussion about this matter among linguists.

sinobball
09-01-2006, 01:46 AM
U need 3000 characters just to read a newspaper.LOL, how many English words you need to read a newspaper?

pinyin Chinese, isn't your username precisely that?

I also studied German for 2 years (I lived in Karlsruhe for 2 years when I was young) but German is just even more difficult than English. The pronounciation is simple, but man, I can never remember the genders? Whats the point...

adebisi
09-01-2006, 08:03 AM
Some Polish words :) :

Hello - CZESC
Whats up? - CO SLYCHAC?
Where is ... - GDZIE JEST ...
What is you name? - JAK MASZ NA IMIE?
What time is now? - KTÓRA JEST GODZINA?
Good morning - DZIEN DOBRY
Left - LEWO
Right - PRAWO
Street - ULICA
Number - NUMER
How much cost... - ILE TO KOSZTUJE...

Polish language belongs to Slavic group. So if you understand russian, you can understand some polish too. I remember I was in some youth camp in France, Taize(?), where we met some serbians, we was drinking, talking etc, and then they started to talk to each other in their own language, we found it quite similar to russian. We couldn't understand what they're talking, but we could understand what they're talking about :D So, to sum up, I think Slavic languages are quite similar :rolleyes:

Jan van Grabski
09-01-2006, 08:15 AM
So, to sum up, I think Slavic languages are quite similar :rolleyes:


i agree, once i was stranded at airport.....i met a macedonian (fyromian) guy and we talked like for 4-5 hours. The problem was that he did not speak english nor any other language except macedonian. But it was very easy to understand him cause as i have some knowledge of russian and czech languages.

YYY
09-01-2006, 10:03 AM
True. I know Russian and Polish languages quite well, so thanks to that I could understand some words of the Slovenian basketball commentator during the games I watched. Huh liubiteli kosharki? ;-)

rikhardur
09-01-2006, 12:54 PM
So, to sum up, I think Slavic languages are quite similar :rolleyes:
Yeah, they are. All the slavic countries can understand themselves to some extent. It's the same thing which happens with Romanic languages or Scandinavian. The languages of each group are similar.

Levenspiel
09-01-2006, 01:17 PM
rikhardur, may I announce you as "the language expert of IBN"? :)

You just clear up every uncertainty and ambigutity here. very helpful, thanks!

rikhardur
09-01-2006, 01:46 PM
rikhardur, may I announce you as "the language expert of IBN"? :)

You just clear up every uncertainty and ambigutity here. very helpful, thanks!
Hehehe thanks man :)

PHILIPeurobasket
09-01-2006, 02:14 PM
Cool..but please tell us how we pronounce these :)

If I will have only some free time - no problem :)

qiangdade
09-01-2006, 02:19 PM
LOL, how many English words you need to read a newspaper?

pinyin Chinese, isn't your username precisely that?

I also studied German for 2 years (I lived in Karlsruhe for 2 years when I was young) but German is just even more difficult than English. The pronounciation is simple, but man, I can never remember the genders? Whats the point...


I didn't mean to be offensive man. In fact i love chinese and i studied it last winter and i will continue to study it this winter. But to read an english or german newspaper u need to know just 26 letters and the meaning of the words that u read. U don't need to know of 3000 words PLUS 3000 different characters. And as i said, the very easy and simple grammar and structure of the chinese language make up for the complex writing system. And yes indeed my nick is pinyin chinese. It is a proof that i love chinese:p . Xie xie for understanding (sadly i cannot use tones with this keyboard:rolleyes: )

sinobball
09-01-2006, 08:49 PM
I didn't mean to be offensive man. Did I sound a little rude? sorry :) Sorry I didn't mean it and I wasn't offended by anyone's post!

I was just mentioning German because I learned it. I love the sound of German, (good for poetry and ... rap?) but remembering the gender is a pain in the ass

As of Chinese, you don't need 3000 characters, only 1000... and probably 800 are composites of the basic 200 characters... you'll see if you study more

What exactly does your name mean? I know there is a "strong" in it, but can't figure out the "de". Does it mean DEutschland?

bobo81
09-02-2006, 08:48 AM
Can someone tell me slang words in Greek?

Whats up?, I'm cool, Take care, have fun...etc :cool:

arsinoh
09-02-2006, 09:37 AM
Can someone tell me slang words in Greek?

Whats up?, I'm cool, Take care, have fun...etc :cool:

Whats up? = "Ti kaneis?" (how are you doing? not slang) "Ti paizei?" (what's going on in your life , slang)

I'm cool (I m not sure the exact meaning of this phrase so perhaps I don't give you a good translation but I'll try) = "Ola kala" (everything is ok)

I m very mad = "Ta exw parei sto kranio" or "Ta exw parei" ("I've taken them to the scull" or "I've taken them") :)

Humiliated = "rompa" (robe) Very humiliated = "rompa ksekoumpoti" (unbuttoned robe :) )

I will try to think more slang phrases and write them but now I have to go. Maybe in the afternoon (greek time) I ll write more. cu!

bobo81
09-02-2006, 10:18 AM
Thanx Arsinoh! Could u please show me how to pronounce these words..I just want to say them correctly! :D

arsinoh
09-03-2006, 08:01 AM
Sorry for not thinking that you will not be able to read greeklish! (greek in latin characters)

Whats up? = "Ti kaneis?"
Pron. Ti kanis? (all the i are pronounced like the i in in


"Ti paizei?" (what's going on in your life , slang)
Pron. Ti pezi? (the same about the i, e is pronounced like e in america

I'm cool = "Ola kala" (everything is ok)
Ola kala (all the a are pronounced like the a in america.

I m very mad = "Ta exw parei sto kranio" or "Ta exw parei"
Ta exo pari sto kranio or ta exo pari
(follow the previous directions about the a e and i, o is like o in orange

Humiliated = "rompa" Very humiliated = "rompa ksekoumpoti"
(The same for these too)

Is this confusing ? :)

Billy
09-03-2006, 02:23 PM
I have noticed though that people from scandinavian countries or the Netherlands have less difficulties learning english, because their languages are so similar.

Danish and Swedish does NOT have a whole lot of similarities with English.
With the same reasoning it should be just as easy for English speakers to learn Swedish but it is not, it has a whole lot to do with the age by which you start studying languages. I found that after my third language it has become so much easier to pick up another one. I suppose by that stage you have trained the language centra in your brain to the extent that you have a framework to fall back on and learn through.
Countries with English as their first language has, IME, been starting with language studies much later and, more likely than not, they dont study a third or fourth language in highschool, they are therefor less likely to have exercised their language centra properly and by the time you enter college its too late as you have to pick a major and dont really study languages (unless its your major ofcourse).


They actually belong to different groups. Finnish belongs to the Uralic group (as well as Estonian, Hungarian, Sami and many other languages spoken especially in northern Russia) and Turkish belongs to the Altaic group (along with Turkmen, Kyrgyz, Mongolian and others).

I actually believe its called the Ugric group and not the Uralic group but I might be wrong here.

qiangdade
09-03-2006, 02:58 PM
[QUOTE=arsinoh]



I m very mad = "Ta exw parei sto kranio" or "Ta exw parei"
Ta exo pari sto kranio or ta exo pari
[QUOTE]


of course u mean "ta echo" and not "ta exo" (<---that is greeklish). The "ch" is pronounced like the spanish "j" and i think it cannot be found in the english language;)

rikhardur
09-03-2006, 03:11 PM
I m very mad = "Ta exw parei sto kranio" or "Ta exw parei"
Ta exo pari sto kranio or ta exo pari



of course u mean "ta echo" and not "ta exo" (<---that is greeklish). The "ch" is pronounced like the spanish "j" and i think it cannot be found in the english language;)
I guess arsinoh was using the symbol of the international phonetic alphabet, though perhaps not being aware of it. The Spanish sound of the letter "j" (and of Scottish Gaelic "ch" in Loch for example) is represented with "x" phonetically.
The international phonetic alphabet is used in most dictionaries next to a word to help in pronunciation.

arsinoh
09-03-2006, 03:17 PM
I guess arsinoh was using the symbol of the international phonetic alphabet, though perhaps not being aware of it. The Spanish sound of the letter "j" (and of Scottish Gaelic "ch" in Loch for example) is represented with "x" phonetically.
The international phonetic alphabet is used in most dictionaries next to a word to help in pronunciation.

:) definitely not being aware of it :)

rikhardur
09-03-2006, 03:22 PM
:) definitely not being aware of it :)
Actually the phonetic alphabet is made of Latin and Greek letters and adaptations of them. I know nothing of Greek, but therefore you perhaps use the letter "x" in Greek to make the sound of the Spanish "j". Is that so? :)

arsinoh
09-03-2006, 03:39 PM
Actually the phonetic alphabet is made of Latin and Greek letters and adaptations of them. I know nothing of Greek, but therefore you perhaps use the letter "x" in Greek to make the sound of the Spanish "j". Is that so? :)

Yes, I think... I m not sure about the sound of the Spanish "j",
I once met a spaniard named Jorhe though and J sound it like the Greek "x"

rikhardur
09-03-2006, 03:50 PM
They actually belong to different groups. Finnish belongs to the Uralic group (as well as Estonian, Hungarian, Sami and many other languages spoken especially in northern Russia) and Turkish belongs to the Altaic group (along with Turkmen, Kyrgyz, Mongolian and others).


I actually believe its called the Ugric group and not the Uralic group but I might be wrong here.
The Uralic group is the main group, then it's divided into subgroups, being Finnish in the Finno-Ugric (the other one is the Samoyedic).
Just for you to have a mental image of it:

Uralic
1. Samoyedic

2. Finno-Ugric
----Finno-Permic
-----Finno-Volgaic
------Finno-Lappic
-------Baltic-Finnic -> Finnish

arsinoh
09-03-2006, 03:59 PM
Some new Greek phrases...
It is all about what happened today....

Remember:
i = like the i in in
e = like e in america
a = like the a in america.
o = like o in orange
g as in Giannakis (more like gh)
b = like b in basketball
th = like th in think
x = like ch in Loch or J in Spanish

Efaga ita = I was shocked

Efaga flasia = it came to me suddenly

Egina xwma = I m exhausted

Efaga pikra = I m disappointed

Ta ida ola = I m surprised

Tin katsame = we are in a very difficult position (some help for the translation? please)

Tin patisame = we are in a very difficult position (some help for the translation? please)

Ta vrika bastounia = It was very difficult for me

Stin kseftila = too easy

Xalase to granazi = I cannot think

rusher
09-03-2006, 06:04 PM
In latvian

Hello - Sveiks (latgalian that is spoken in my region: Vasals )
Whats up? - Kas noticis (Kas nūtics)
Where is ... - Kur ir (the same as latvian)
What is you name? - Kāds ir tavs vārds? (Keids ir tovs vuords)
What time is now? - Cik laika? (the same)
Good morning - Labrīt (Lobreit)
Left - Pa kreisi
Right - Pa labi
Street - iela (īla)
Number - numurs (the same)
How much cost... - Cik maksā... (cik moksoi)

Actually latgalian is not a language but a dialect. It is a little bit different then latvian language. I know that earlier it was like a language but now many latvian words are only pronounced in latgalian way so it becomes more like a dialect. We try to stop it but it's hard. We're lucky that now many young people think that it's not old fashioned like they did earlier mostly because some of our bands sing songs in latgalian. I think latgalian is older than latvian because latvian language is basically formed from latgalian, lithuanian, some words from German, Russian and a little bit from suomi-ugric. Lithuanian language is much older than latvian but there are many similarities in these two languages- only two Baltic languages that are live today.

Jan van Grabski
09-03-2006, 06:34 PM
yeahh, this is pretty similar to my language. you will see lithuanian version in red.

Hello - Sveiks - Sveikas (lith)
Whats up? - Kas noticis - kaip einasi
Where is ... - Kur ir - Kur yra
What is you name? - Kāds ir tavs vārds? - Koks yra tavo vardas
What time is now? - Cik laika? - Kiek laiko
Good morning - Labrīt - Labas rytas


But this is strange, i thought that latgalian was kinda separate language not a dialect of latvian. hmmmmm.... i am confused.