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Thread: Indian Basketball: Total Story

  1. #21
    Senior Member lovejones's Avatar
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    Hi guys. Here's an article written by Rick Olivares (Filipino) on India's Young Cagers. The author is in Jakarta writing about Smart Gilas and their experiences growing up as a team. Smart Gilas is the developmental national team of the Philippines composed of college players. The other national team of the Philippines is the PBA Powerade Team which is made up of professional players.

    Sunday, May 17, 2009
    India's Young Cagers: The Young and the Restless
    by Rick Olivares
    http://bleachersbrew.blogspot.com/



    JAKARTA, INDONESIA -- Aleksandar Bucan is a long way from Serbia. After plying his trade in his native country where he played for Partizan, Radivoj Korac, and Zemun and coaching in Europe, the Belgrade native now finds himself in India coaching its basketball national team.

    On the way to the Britama Arena, he sits quietly thinking of the storm that is coming. His Young Cagers are truthfully that both in name and in age.

    India is far from a basketball country. The sport is so far down the line of priority that Bucan wryly notes that “we just have scraps.”

    The roster of the Young Cagers isn’t even the best of India. Many of its best players play for the corporations that employ them. So they are part time hoopsters and part time white-collar workers. Government support is a pittance and when the national team is training, their allowance totals a measly $9 a day.

    “What can you do with $9?” says Bucan throwing his hands up in exasperation. “No one will be motivated to play.”

    But how is one motivated when there is no professional league. There are no proper basketball courts and facilities to train. For many of the cagers, the FIBA Asia Champions Cup is one big adventure until they figure out that it’s time to get a real job.

    That the team advanced to the quarterfinals is victory in itself and Bucan is willing to swallow his pride at the coming beaten by Iran that has been making a name for itself in Asia as a basketball power. “But it is opportunity.”

    He commends the Philippines for its love of the game and has plenty of good words for its head Coach Rajko Toroman. “Step in the right direction for Filipinos. In India…” His voice trails off. “It is opportunity.”

    On the way to Britama Arena, forward Trideep Rai has his feet perched atop the high seats of the bus. He smiles at his teammates and tells a joke.

    Bucan closes his eyes and lets out a sigh that no one hears.

    Against Iran, its dangerous forward Nikkah Bahrami fakes Rai out of his Air Jordans then throws up a three-pointer that is all net. With 1:17 left in the first quarter, Iran is up by 20. Rai has a sheepish grin then looks at Bucan. Bucan cocks an eyebrow and gestures to his player. “That’s why you shouldn’t stay too far from your man.”

    With point guard Talwinderjeet Singh taken out by the tight guarding His opposite Mahdi Kamrany, India’s offense goes south quick. Center Jagdeep Singh who his oft the beneficiary of drop passes by Tal cannot buy a shot.

    Iran’s high-flying American reinforcement Jackson Vroman and Bahrami take apart the Indians’ defense.

    Bucan takes a seat, folds his arms, and leans back. “It’s for experience, he would later say.

    His Iranian opposite Mostafa Hashemi meantime remains standing. He has not sat down all match long as if his team was far behind. It’s Iran 44 India 20 with 5:15 left in the second quarter.

    With 2:03 left in the second quarter Talwinderjeet fouls out. He throws his headband on the bench in disgust and mutters in his native tongue. Bucan looks at him.

    Hashemi pulls out Vroman not even bothering to send 7’2” Priest Luaderdale into the game. “We’ve got two more matches,” blurts out Vroman on his way back to the bench.

    Iran leads by 26 at the half 50-24 and they don’t even bother to go to the locker room at the half. They know it’s over.

    Jagdeep Singh refuses to give up. He talks trash to Iran’s 6’11” Hooman Razaee who points a finger at him. “Don’t do that to me again or else…” he warns the Indian about his roughhousing. Singh looks back and on the next possession buries a turnaround jumper with Razaee all over him. He beats on his chest.

    On the next trip back, Iran buries India with an artillery barrage from medium and long range.

    Bucan’s Young Cagers in the meantime are no longer laughing. They’re sucking in air and looking bewildered. Rai would later exclaim, “When people ask me what I do, I say I play basketball for national team. Then they ask, ‘We have national team?’ So I say yes and they look at me like I am joking.”

    But no one on the team is laughing and outside the rain is coming down in Jakarta.


    India's campaign in the 20th FIBA Asia Champions Challenge Cup:

    lost 63-88 Al Arabi Qatar

    beat Al Wasil UAE 82-76

    lost to Zain Jordan 59-90

    lost to Satria Muda Britama Indonesia 59-79

    lost to Mahram Iran 73-97
    Last edited by lovejones; 05-17-2009 at 11:51 AM.

  2. #22

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    Jones,


    Thank you for the article.


    Yudhistir
    The whole life is summarized in two things;

    Hankering for what we don't have
    and
    Lamenting for we have lost

    -Srila Prabhupada

    www.indiabasket.net: India's top basketball site

  3. #23
    Administrator stuart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lovejones View Post
    The roster of the Young Cagers isn’t even the best of India. Many of its best players play for the corporations that employ them. So they are part time hoopsters and part time white-collar workers. Government support is a pittance and when the national team is training, their allowance totals a measly $9 a day.

    “What can you do with $9?” says Bucan throwing his hands up in exasperation. “No one will be motivated to play.”

    But how is one motivated when there is no professional league. There are no proper basketball courts and facilities to train. For many of the cagers, the FIBA Asia Champions Cup is one big adventure until they figure out that it’s time to get a real job.
    The best players play for corporations and cannot be called for national duty? I guess that makes sense - the companies can afford to pay them better than $0.75 a day ($9/12)... crazy. When I find the time tomorrow, I am going to post these crazy facts on the frontpage.

    Stuart

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    Default Update on some developments on basketball in India

    Kansas City, USA basketball coach Shahid Bhat recently traveled to Kashmir to conduct basketball clinics at Delhi Public High School and well as to volunteer coach at the 2nd JD Walsh Basketball School event in Kashmir. Mr. Bhat coached for 4 years at The Barstow School in Kansas City, MO after attending the University of Kansas where he studied Psychology. The University of Kansas is often referred to the birthplace of basketball, with the sports inventor, Dr. James Naismith having been a physical education instructor there, as well as the school's first basketball coach. His grave is located 5 mins from campus. Mr. Bhat has twenty years playing experience, covering youth basketball, high school varisty, elite AAU competition and NAIA level college basketball. His mission is to promote basketball in India and offer top level coaching in the sport. His methods involve all aspects of skill development, basketball specific speed and strength conditioning,, as well as psychological strategies for the athlete.




  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by kashmirbasketball View Post
    That was a quite a image.
    The whole life is summarized in two things;

    Hankering for what we don't have
    and
    Lamenting for we have lost

    -Srila Prabhupada

    www.indiabasket.net: India's top basketball site

  6. #26

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    Thats written by JD walsh, he has quite active in India and has conducted successful camps in lots of cities.
    The whole life is summarized in two things;

    Hankering for what we don't have
    and
    Lamenting for we have lost

    -Srila Prabhupada

    www.indiabasket.net: India's top basketball site

  7. #27

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    this league is a sleeper, but shouldnt be strayed away from. . .coming up big and fast!

  8. #28
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    Default Amazing thread

    Hey Yudhishtir thanks for the valuable information .

    [No ads please, put it in your signature if you wish]
    Last edited by rikhardur; 10-20-2009 at 07:47 PM.

  9. #29
    Senior Member raichu08's Avatar
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    In 2000 robinson was a part of the ABC (Fiba Asia) All stars and did not play a single minute.

    Speaking of which, Where is the 7'4 mohammed islau din? I remember the guy, along with Robinson Participated in the slam dunk contest in abc all star game 2000. Fans were going wild after he made a kobe bryant between the legs dunk. Islau din and Robinson were defeated by pba player don camaso (now of the brunei barracudas).

  10. #30

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    very nice

  11. #31

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    Islaudin has now retired, he is around 31 years or so.
    The whole life is summarized in two things;

    Hankering for what we don't have
    and
    Lamenting for we have lost

    -Srila Prabhupada

    www.indiabasket.net: India's top basketball site

  12. #32
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    It's time for India to become a powerhouse in Asian basketball. And I will help them.

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by kashmirbasketball View Post
    Kansas City, USA basketball coach Shahid Bhat recently traveled to Kashmir to conduct basketball clinics at Delhi Public High School and well as to volunteer coach at the 2nd JD Walsh Basketball School event in Kashmir. Mr. Bhat coached for 4 years at The Barstow School in Kansas City, MO after attending the University of Kansas where he studied Psychology. The University of Kansas is often referred to the birthplace of basketball, with the sports inventor, Dr. James Naismith having been a physical education instructor there, as well as the school's first basketball coach. His grave is located 5 mins from campus. Mr. Bhat has twenty years playing experience, covering youth basketball, high school varisty, elite AAU competition and NAIA level college basketball. His mission is to promote basketball in India and offer top level coaching in the sport. His methods involve all aspects of skill development, basketball specific speed and strength conditioning,, as well as psychological strategies for the athlete.
    Need to contact him. Hope he is on facebook.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by raichu08 View Post
    Speaking of which, Where is the 7'4 mohammed islau din?
    India already have two new Islaudin, the Bhullar brothers.

  15. #35
    Senior Member Khalid80's Avatar
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    Default Indian National Team

    Great job 3Scout4India . I used to be a big fan of Robinson but unfortunately he didn't have talented players on the team with him.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Khalid80 View Post
    Great job 3Scout4India . I used to be a big fan of Robinson but unfortunately he didn't have talented players on the team with him.
    Robinson is a great talent even though limited competition in India he is that good exposure is what India lacks playing competitive basketball every now and then will make them better

  17. #37
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    Default Indian National Team

    This is the current roster of Indian senior national team.

    4 Sambhaji Kadam (179-G-80) of Young Cagers
    5 Talwinderjit Singh (182-G/F-86) of Young Cagers
    6 Hareesh Koroth (185-G-84) of Young Cagers
    7 Haraplsinh Vaghela (174-G-85) of Young Cagers
    8 Sunil Kumar Rathee (195-F-91)
    9 Vishesh Bhriguvanshi (192-G-91) of Young Cagers
    10 Prakash Mishra (180-G/F-82) of Western Railway Mumbai
    11 Vineeth Revi (202-C-84) of Young Cagers
    12 Abhilek Paul (180-G/F-86)
    13 Jayram Jat (189-G/F-81) of Young Cagers
    14 Dinesh Coimbatore (193-G-85)
    15 Jagdeep Singh (199-C-86) of Young Cagers
    Head Coach: Aleksandar Bucan (Serbia)

    There are some very good prospects such as Briguvanshi or Rathee. But India have many talented players all over the world that deserve to be in the squad.

    To become a real threat to other asian nations, India must add taller and more talented players such as centers Timir Patel (6'10, 1986), Sam Singh (6'9, 1985), brothers Tanveer (7'2) and Sim Bhullar (7'4), Ram Carlo Sharma (198, 1980) or outside players such as Anish Sharda (191, 1982) or Dipanjot Singh (6'3, 1989).

    I'm working on it .

  18. #38
    Senior Member satria_muda's Avatar
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    I'm looking for the pics and info of Indian league, do you have it ?

    anyway those 2 guys born in 1991 are they really good..?
    "BHINEKA TUNGGAL IKA"

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    Quote Originally Posted by satria_muda View Post
    I'm looking for the pics and info of Indian league, do you have it ?

    anyway those 2 guys born in 1991 are they really good..?
    Nope.

    Vishesh Bhriguvanshi is really good.

    All’s Well That Ends Well in New Delhi

    NEW DELHI, July 6, 2008 -- This was the day when campers went all out to prove themselves as the best and most deserving to be selected as the East and West All-Stars, to lay out all they had learned over the past three days and ultimately be crowned the 2008 Basketball without Borders Asia All-Star.

    The morning started out with a flurry of activities, where NBA players joined camp director Dean Cooper to host a Jr. NBA/ WNBA clinic at the Siri Fort Sports Complex for over 100 children who had been invited by the Basketball Federation of India. Kids arrived almost an hour before the clinic began and even though it soon started raining, it couldn’t dampen their excitement of receiving NBA-style training in their own backyard.

    Kids were broken down into groups and taken through shooting and rebound drills, while players cautioned them to be careful on the slippery courts. Kyle’s station was especially rowdy, when they had to

    Back at the American Embassy School, campers attended the second session of the HIV/AIDS education and prevention life skills seminar hosted by the Modicare Foundation. They were reminded that as young athletes, they are going to be role models for the people at home, and they have a social duty to behave responsibly. After classes, they took to the courts for a last round of games to warm-up and simply enjoy the last morning of drills and training with their fellow campers from all over Asia.

    Where Basketball without Borders Asia All-Stars Happens

    The 2008 BWB Asia All-Star game was a spectacle to behold. It contained not only the best 24 players of the camp, but a half-time show and a rocking crowd. In front of 300 plus fans, the East and West Stars were neck-and-neck, by half-time the West Stars were leading by a 32-29.

    Four contestants took to the courts during half-time for the 3-point contest. Park Jung Hoon from Korean beat Yuki Mitsuhara from Japan in the first round by 8-5; while Lim Ming-Hui from Chinese Taipei edged out Ivan Makarchuk from Kyrgyzstan by 7-5. Lim and Park proceeded to the final round but tied it at 6 shots, but Lim proved himself to be the Ray Allen from Chinese Taipei and knocked Park out by one at 7 to 6. Kyle Korver was no threat to Lim’s title as he defeated Kyle 7-3.

    It was a blow-out when the West Stars continued to dominate the second half of the game, with Lim Jong Ill leading the team to victory at 74:53 and was crowned Nike MVP of the All-Star Game.

    Dong Hanlin from China won the Frequent Flyer Award presented by American Airlines, recording the highest jump amongst all campers. The DHL Playmaker award went to Joseph Zaloum from Lebanon, and Xu Tao from China was given the sportsmanship award by Tata Consultancy Awards. But it was India’s own young talent Vishesh Bhriguvanshi who won the loudest cheer and applause in the gym, becoming a hero when he was named Nike MVP of the Basketball without Borders Asia camp!
    http://www.nba.com/global/asia/day4_080706.html

  20. #40
    Senior Member kaiziken_pinas's Avatar
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    the lineup isn't as tall. Opposite of what I expected.

    anyway sir, are there taller players in the pool?

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