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Thread: 7'1" - Zhou Qi

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    Senior Member DarknessFalls's Avatar
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    Default 7'1" - Zhou Qi

    http://www.nbadraft.net/players/zhou-qi

    Strengths: Has quickly become the next great hope of Chinese basketball ... Very quick for a big man ... A legitimate offensive threat. does decent job in both man-to-man post defense and help defense ... Handles and passes the ball well ... Displays a soft touch, has shooting range out to the FIBA three-point line ... Runs the floor well ... Excellent fundamentals ... Displays some guards skills, his dribbling and penetrating is way better than most big men ... His defense from the weak-side is also much better than most Chinese big men which is why his timing is so good and why he has great shot blocking stats ... His listed age is assumed to be true: 1996 and not changed. But there are sure to be doubts about that ...

    Weaknesses: His athleticism isn't considered to be among the top prospects but his skill level and feel for the game are very good ... Needs to improve reflexes, not an explosive leaper at this point, not aggressive enough in post offense ... Needs improvement in defense rebound positioning ... Has already started to build muscles, but still needs to put on muscle, but not too much right away ... Needs to improve man-to-man defense and strengthen his footwork and finishing ability and prevent injury ... Still needs experience as his amount of games played is very low ...

    Notes: Has become an overnight sensation in China after scoring 41 pts, 28 rebs,15 blks in an U-16 tourney in early February (2011) against Germany, had 26 pts against Bulgaria, 28 pts in a close game against France and 30 pts 17r 8b against Turkey in the finals, helping China win gold and earning MVP of the event ... Zhou Qi began his basketball career playing with the Liaoning Youth Team in the 2005, at that time he was only 5'6" (172cm). In 2009 his height has reached 6'9" (205cm). Zhou is 7'1" (215cm) now, and is expected to grow into 7'2" (217-218cm)。He's signed to a contract through 2013 so going to an American top NCAA schools could be an option, however his coach has stated he feels it is a better option for him to stay and develop in China ...

    *He is signed to play with Liaoning Sports Bureau until 2013. Right now he is training and playing for Liaoning Youth (Basketball) Team. After 2013, the Chinese pro teams will compete to get him ...

    *Dwight Howard is his favorite NBA player.

    *His coach compares him to Wang Zhizhi (first Chinese center drafted - by the Mavs)

    *Contributions from hoopCHINA.com

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    Senior Member Saskibaloia's Avatar
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    He really should try to go to a Division I NCAA school to really uplift his skills. In addition, this will also prepare for him life in the US (if he is to be drafted).
    "No hay poder en el mundo que pueda cambiar el destino"
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    He is signed to play with Liaoning Sports Bureau until 2013. Right now he is training and playing for Liaoning Youth (Basketball) Team. After 2013, the Chinese pro teams will compete to get him
    The NCAA is very apprehensive on contracts. At the moment, the direction of Zhou is similar to the path of his predecessors of Yao, Yi, etc; Where Zhou could start playing professionally at a young age at the CBA and duties for the National team. Maybe then later, Zhou would make himself available for let's say as early as the 2016 NBA draft.
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    He'd better put on about 50 pounds over the next 5 years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saskibaloia View Post
    He really should try to go to a Division I NCAA school to really uplift his skills. In addition, this will also prepare for him life in the US (if he is to be drafted).
    Why does everyone say these Chinese prospects should go to Div I to improve their skills? I don't think it helps. We saw what happened to Max Zhang who went to play ball at Cal. he plays a couple of minutes a game... and the rest of the time he's probably studying a foreign language like Spanish or USA Gov't.
    By playing a few minutes in NCAA games, he basically destroyed his chance of getting drafted by an NBA team.


    These players are better off playing in China (CBA). not only do they get to play more, they build up their marketability. Once they become familiar with the chinese citizens, they would become more famous. Had Zhang stayed in china to play in the CBA he would probably still be considered an NBA prospect based on his height and his mystery. (ala Sun Ming Ming).

    btw, thanks for watching my video clip of Zhou Qi.

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    He needs to take care of your knees

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    Default Zhou Qi 1 of the Best of the Bottom 8(Albert Schweitzer 2012)

    Before analyzing the best prospects from the Top 8 teams; teams that I have seen at least twice during the tournament; I wanted to give a quick recap on several players from the teams that finished in the Bottom 8 and that I could only see once. So these scouting reports remain quite short and not every aspect of the game of the players is mentioned. Additionally, I eventually missed out several players because of poor games, injuries or other reasons that kept them from having an impact in that specific game.

    Emmett Naar was playing Point Guard for the Australian team. He showed a nice first step when attacking on his weaker left hand where he regularly could score from close. With his excellent wingspan, he was able to create also difficult scoop shots and score the layup against taller players. His ball handling was correct and he scored also from the jump shot after a crossover dribble. He is the typical high energy player on the defensive end where he puts a lot of pressure on the ball handler. Not very large, he might struggle if he has to play against physically stronger players on the defensive end. His jump shot is not very fluid or quick so that he has some problems to take it against the man. But in general, he looks like an interesting player to follow over the next years, even if he is not a particularly creative for his team mates.

    Dane Pineau was the second force of the Australian team. The 2m03 tall forward from Melbourne averaged 11.7ppg and 9.0rpg in the tournament. The very lanky and energetic player did not really show a lot of technical finesse but knew how to use his skills and possibilities to be effective. Most of his moves looked very mechanical and his foot work is at least improvable. However, he managed to beat his opponents on the drive and score against them with some difficult moves like running hook shots or up and under plays. He can post up smaller defenders and is also capable of netting the occasional three-point or mid-range jump shot. His high-energy presence on the defensive end was another important asset that he had to offer but he might be a bit too limited technically to be considered as a top level prospect.

    Yaniv Solomon was the statistical leader of the Israeli team. The 1994 born forward from Maccabi Rishon Le-Zion showed good drives to the basket where he was able to finish against the defense. But next to that, he was also capable of netting the three-point shot with good regularity as his shooting mechanics looked well developed. Physically strong, Solomon has also good athletic basics which allow him to finish plays with two-handed dunks and be a big factor in rebounding and shot blocking. Limited by his size to play the inside positions, Solomon was often used as a Small forward which should be his future position as well.

    Rafael Menco was the vocal leader of the Israeli team and doing the dirty work for his team. Averaging by far the most minutes for Israel (more than 31 per game) and having only a –0.2 +/- for a team averaging defeats by more than 9 points underlines his importance to the team. Basically, Israel lost their games in the 9 minutes when Menco was on the bench. Physically strong and very versatile, Menco played a role of Point Forward creating a lot for himself but also finding his team mates. He needs to become more stable from behind the line and improve his shoot selection (38.3% FGs) in the future to become a factor on the professional level.

    Idan Zalmanson showed some interesting stuff in the few minutes I was able to see him. Looking very big and even a little overweight, Zalmanson had an excellent shooting touch as he was able to knock down several difficult jump shots out of the low post situation or after a Pick and Roll. Clearly not the most explosive guy around, Zalmanson was mainly using his technique to finish around the key. He struggled to score from very close against defense as he is not very athletic or able to use his strength in the right way. If Zalmanson can develop his body in the right way, he will certainly be an important factor for Israel in the future because of his size and overall potential.

    Daniel Sealine was the main scoring threat from Israel in the backcourt. Mainly driving to the basket despite his limited size, Sealine showed that he can finish in traffic or even against taller players because of a good athletic package and hangtime skills. Not very effective from the three-point area or creative, Sealine looks a bit undersized to play Shooting Guard at the highest level. His scoring skills will however be a good asset for the different Israeli Youth National Teams over the next years but his long term potential is a bit questionable if he can not develop a more PG oriented game.

    Zhou Qi showed tremendous potential in the limited minutes he was on the court when I was seeing a game of China. First of all, he is 2m15 tall and born in 1996 which gives him even a bit of potential growing in the next years (despite the usual Chinese birthday doubts) as he looks very skinny and not fully mature in his body development. His shooting mechanics are very fluid and guard-like and he is able to score the jumper from mid-range in both catch-and-shoot and dribble situations. He even was able to adjust his jump shot to a perfect form out of the dribble after being severely hit on his arm. Qi is not very fast (he is fast for a 2m15 tall player but not guard-fast) or explosive though which makes him finish a lot more with technique than force around the basket
    He tries to score with both hands when he is within a few meters of the basket but was not successful using his left hand in the attempts he made when I was there. Overall, his game remains though very naïve and immature especially on defense where he got called for a lot of cheap fouls. He rebounds the ball well because of his size and has excellent timing for blocking shots. All this makes Zhou Qi one of the most promising prospects overall of the tournament knowing that he was two years younger than the rest. He is definitely one of the players to follow in the future and he will certainly have a huge impact during the upcoming U17 World Championships this summer.


    Ludvig “Ludde” Hakanson was another 96 born prospect that showcased his skills during the Albert Schweitzer Tournament 2012 and is theoretically still eligible for the next edition in two years. The Barcelona guard was the vocal leader of the team and showed great shooting skills from behind the arc. He controlled the game speed very well for such a young player and made several clutch decisions in the right way. Physically, he is already pretty strong for a 1996 born and he showed good decision making skills but he has of course still to learn whom to give the ball in which situation. Additionally, he rebounded the ball well and was able to initiate immediately the fast break where he mostly looked for his own scoring possibilities first. Overall, Hakanson is an excellent potential to develop into a future high-level scoring point guard.

    Niklas Larsson is a long combo-guard who played a nice tournament for the Swedish National team. Moving very fluidly, Larsson can score from behind the arc or from mid-range areas but lacks a bit of physique and explosiveness to make the baskets from close with defense on him. He even avoids using his left hand for the finish preferring more difficult moves with his right hand instead. Larsson is able to run the Point during stretches as he can find his team mates out of the drives with good dishes or kick outs. He needs though to become stronger but he has the potential to develop into a player that is able to play professionally down the road.

    Lukas Bergäng is another highly interesting prospect coming from Sweden. The 1995 born and 2m10 tall forward plays currently for Casale Monferrato in Italy and he showed in Mannheim why the Italian team has recruited him. He is really long and mobile on the court, can take the jump shot out of the dribbling situation and rebounds the ball very well. Physically, there is still a long way to go but he is only 17 years old and has a good frame to work with in the future. He was not a major factor in terms of scoring impact in Mannheim but he has an excellent potential down the road.

    Dimitrios Agravanis was one of the few interesting players on the Greek team. He was also the only one who did not have a negative +/- ratio on average. Agravanis is nicely athletic forward who has a good presence on both ends of the floor. He can shoot the three pointer but mainly operates close to the basket. Out of Pick and Roll situations, he does a good job moving to the basket and can finish his plays with two handed dunks against defense. Being 2m08 tall, he has excellent size for playing Power Forward on the next level and is eventually considering the NCAA as an option according to what we heard.

    Peter Moeller was the top scorer for the Danish team as the guard logged long minutes for the 15th placed team. We did not see many new stuff on Moeller who showed great progress on the PG position during the NIJT in Kaunas but had to play SG or even SF during long moments in the only game I saw from Denmark. He had to use a lot his left hand as the defense closed his right one and was able to finish several floaters with his weaker hand even against taller players. For more info on him, it’s better to check the report from the NIJT.

    Rasmus Larsen came into the tournament after months plagued by several injuries and left with another little foot injury. The big time prospect from Denmark showed his usual tremendous skill set and improved body and it will be interesting to see how well he can play once he is fully healed. Let’s hope that comes in time for the major events of the summer so that he can underline his status as one of the top prospects of the 1994 generation in Europe.


    http://www.europeanprospects.com/?p=3762
    Last edited by FEIFEI; 04-18-2012 at 07:51 AM. Reason: wrong

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    Senior Member CKR13's Avatar
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    I will be sure to watch Zhou Qi in the 2nd FIBA U-17 World Championships (June 29 - July 8). China is in Group A alongside Australia, Czech Republic, Egypt, France and the USA.
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    CHN - Qi learns valuable lessons against physical Europeans

    BEIJING (FIBA U17 World Championship) – Zhou Qi does not carry much weight on his 2.13m (7ft 1in) frame. But the 16-year-old Chinese rising star learned some valuable lessons against older and more physical players earlier this month at the Albert Schweitzer Tournament (AST) in preparation for the FIBA U17 World Championship.

    China purposely brought a team full of 16 and 17 year old players to the U18 biennial tournament in Mannheim, Germany to prepare for the U17 Worlds in Lithuania in June and July.

    “The major thing I learned was that players are a lot more physical and stronger in this tournament than what I was used to before. I learned a lot in playing more physically at center,” said Qi, who finished as the top shot blocker with 4.2 blocks per game in Mannheim.

    He also averaged 16.2 points (sixth among all players) on 57 percent shooting from the field, grabbed 7.8 rebounds (seventh)and had the highest efficiency rating (22.4).

    “This is definitely stronger than the U17 World Championship physically. So it’s really good preparation for the U17s. We will go back to China and look at what we did and what we need to do. I will be more focused on those fields,” explained Qi, who is expected to be one of the top stars this summer in Kaunas.

    China head coach Zhang Bin has high hopes for the teenager.

    “Qi will become a very good player in the future. But he has to get stronger physically," he said.

    “He’s really smart. He knows where to go and when. He has a good feeling for the ball. He has everything you need for a center.”

    Zhang Bin praised Qi for his footwork and said his future is bright.

    “For now, he’s 16, so he’s still young. He will definitely play well in the Chinese league, but it will depend on him and how he develops if he can play well in the NBA,” he cautioned.

    Qi's talent is recognised by opponents too.

    “I think he’s an exciting prospect for China basketball," said Australia coach Damian Cotter after Qi went for 13 points, seven rebounds, five blocks, three assists and two steals against his team at the AST.

    "He’s obviously very big, but he’s got nice hands. He’s got good footwork. I think in the next two or three years as he develops his body, he is going to become a force to be reckoned with."

    Qi, who said he idolizes veteran China center Wang Zhizhi, is working most on getting more mass and strength as well as his techniques under the basket.

    He will need to have a good tournament in Lithuania as the Chinese are grouped with Egypt, Australia, Czech Republic, France and the United States in preliminary round play.

    “Asia’s level is still lower compared to the other teams in the world. So these will all be strong teams for us. We will just try our best to do the best we can,” said Qi about the group.

    The young talent also said he is avoiding paying too much attention to all the hoopla back home about him becoming China’s next big basketball superstar.

    “I’m just trying to be myself. I’m trying not to pay attention to the media attention. I just want to be myself. I’m trying to improve and just get better,” said Qi.

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    Zhou Qi played well against the U-17 players of Australia, Lithuania and Denmark in the 4 team tournament meant as a tune-up for the U-17 World championships. The match-up of Zhou Qi against Denmark's Rasmus Larsen and Jacob Jensen was a highlight.

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    Default Zhou Qi in action against the Dongguan Leopard Youth Team








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    China Defeats the Czech Republic to Finish Seventh at World U-17 Tourney -
    China defeated the Czech Republic 77-70 today to finish seventh in the FIBA World Under-17 Basketball Championship. This was exactly the same place that the Guo Ailun-led U-17 tournament finished at the tournament two years ago. This, at the least, shows that the progress made by the earlier team is being maintained and that China can now be competitive with any of the top teams in the world, exept the United States.

    China had a fallow period in the 2000's as it shifted from its own unique way of playing basketball to the way the rest of the world plays the game. China's earlier teams could shoot but were non-competitive in other aspects of the game, especially rebounding and defense. Now we will begin to find out whether China's progress will continue or whether this is the permanent level that China has reached. Is China just beginning to touch the talents of its billion-plus population which may have some advantages over European populations in quickness and jumping ability though disadvantages in bulk and arm-length?

    At this level, China will eventually win a medal when the team is both good and lucky. Or, if it continues its baketball progress, China could rise to the level of the former Soviet Union and Yugoslavia, which consistently won medals at world tournaments. It is even possible that China could rise to the level of the United States, and the world could have two great basketball powers. The future will tell.

    Zhou Qi led China today with 16 points, 9 rebounds, 3 assists, 2 steals and 4 blocks and could very well develop into a world class center and end up in the NBA. One reason China is experimenting with using Wang Zhelin at power forward is that he and Zhou Qi could one day be an impressive front-court duo. Wang seems the better offensive player while Zhou excels at shot-blocking and defense.

    Wang Zhengbo (187-G-96), a 187 cm guard listed as born in October 1996, was China's second most effective player today. He had 16 points on 6 of 8 shooting and grabbed 4 rebounds. Liu Bo also shot 6 of 8 and had 13 points and 5 rebounds in 38 minutes, the most played by any Chinese player. Zhao Jiwei returned to form with 13 points, 7 rebounds, 6 assists, 4 steals and 4 turnovers. Han Delong had 8 points, 3 rebounds and 3 assists. Guo Xiaopeng had 7 points, 3 rebounds, 4 assists and 2 steals.

    China and the Czechs each had 34 rebounds. China had 17 turnovers to 13 for the Czech Republic. China made 47 percent of its field goals to 41 percent for the Czechs. China trailed 25-20 after one quarter but led 39-38 at the half. The score was tied 59-59 after three quarters.

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    ZHOU QI and Wang zheling will play in U18 China yout NT with Gao Shang.

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    So far, I have not seen Zhou Qi being fielded or started with Wang Zhelin. Wang Zhelin starts and is thus far, the star of the tournament. Bai Bing and Dai Huaibo are playing much more minutes compared to Zhou. Plus he is rather new with the core of this U-18 team that saw action in the U-17 world championship, so he and his teammates are still adjusting with one another on the court.
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    Video of Zhou's training in the States:


    I know he's been compared to Yao but Zhou Qi is basically a replica of Wang Zhizhi at the same age. Height, frame, mobility, hops, shooting touch, coordination, and even intensity level and maybe personality, the similarities are uncanny. Biggest difference is Zhou is right-handed. Of course Zhou has far more opportunities today.
    Last edited by sinobball; 01-20-2013 at 12:32 PM.
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    I only saw Wang when he was older (firs time i can recall in Sidney Olympics) but this kid looks more athletic and explosive IMO.

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    Senior Member sinobball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbenga View Post
    I only saw Wang when he was older (firs time i can recall in Sidney Olympics) but this kid looks more athletic and explosive IMO.
    15-seconds of Wang Zhizhi in 1996:
    aim low, score high

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    I saw GIF images over at weibo that highlight's Zhou's lateral movement training. Did a behind the back dribble at sprint to nimbly swerve a hurdle that lead to a pivot spin move; avoiding another hurdle and lay it in nicely.

    I say he improved his motor coordination in handling the ball.
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    How come he's not in the roster for the NIJT? http://www.euroleague.net/events/nik...nament-rosters

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    Zhou Qi missed the NIJT due to playing with his provincial team in the national China games. But he is back with the U19 now.
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