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View Full Version : Feelings about multiracial and/or foreign-born Asians?



sinobball
06-29-2010, 02:34 PM
This question has been raised many times in many forms in Asian basketball, I figure I'll make a poll in the OT section. "Asian" here includes Middle Easterners if the term is confusing.

I made the poll with basketball NTs in mind but of course the question isn't limited to that. In particular, ask you this, if all things are equal, would you feel comfortable having this person serve as your national president?

b3lowzro
06-29-2010, 05:27 PM
as long he/she is willing to embrace our culture through thick and thin, I don't care if that mixed asian is 1/128 pinoy.

Czarkazem13
06-29-2010, 08:10 PM
ONE OF US!!!
ONE OF US!!!
ONE OF US!!!

Sorry...flashbacks.:D

kerouac82
06-30-2010, 01:53 AM
I've noticed that foreign-born Pinoys, or those with foreign lineage, are met with two diametrically-opposite reactions. One is a feeling of "he is not one of us", which is not surprising, considering that the Philippines were formerly colonies of three different powers.

Another is that of being a panacea to all the country's troubles, especially when it comes to sports. Having a degree from a foreign university is also a plus when it comes to politics and the academe, and in fact, gives someone more "credibility".

Personally, I wouldn't mind having a foreign-born president, especially if he/she was brought up Filipino/Filipina.

cardenales
06-30-2010, 03:57 AM
Kerouac82, I know that the Phillipines used to be colonies of Spain and the USA. Now, my question is ?Which was the other major power that the Phillipines use to be their colony? Sorry if I sound ignorant.


Kerouac82, Do spanish still speak in the Phillipines?

I know that when it was a spanish colony was spoke and after the Phillipines become US colony since 1898 to after World War II that the Phillipines become a free country. Now, after that generation, still spoke today?

I know Tagalog have spanish words.

sinobball
06-30-2010, 04:04 AM
Kerouac82, I know that the Phillipines used to be colonies of Spain and the USA. Now, my question is ?Which was the other major power that the Phillipines use to be their colony? Sorry if I sound ignorant.I think he meant Britain?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_occupation_of_the_Philippines

Also Japan in WWII made the Philippines a colony, sort of.

I do have 1 question though: what percentage of mixed/foregin-born PBA/PBL/Smart Gilas players can speak Tagalog?

daniab
06-30-2010, 06:37 AM
When you have 3/4 of your population living outside , you can't but to welcome them when they return.
For an exemple , if a Lebanese man left to US and marry an American , his son would be Americanized because of the culture 1st and his mom second , if this guy wants to be back to Lebanon , shall i classify him as a foreign?

yestetday i watched an interview with a Lebanese guy who was adpoted by a dutch family , when he grew up , he decided to come back to Lebanon and search for his heritage , and he comes back and succeeded and he wrote a book about it, this guy also married a Lebanese women.
P.S: this guy only speaks dutch , and he became a dutch citizen!

My conclusion is : those guys are Lebanese like us , for sure they need first to care about their herritage ,if they did not , then for sure i would'nt welcome them.But as much as they care ,even if they r 0.01 % Lebanese , i still welcome them and treat like a normal citizen!

kerouac82
06-30-2010, 09:10 AM
It was Japan, actually. The British occupied the Philippines in 1762-1764, while Japan subjugated what was then the Commonwealth of the Philippines during World War II. For a period after the war, Filipinos of Japanese descent were not exactly well-received. In contrast, British presence in the 19th century consisted mainly of a few trading houses in the principal ports and didn't have the impact that the Japanese occupation had on our history.

As for your question, sinobball, I'd like to think that most of them would've picked up at least a few basic words or phrases during their stay here. This is because English is the second language here anyway and people are more likely to understand them here than, say, in Beijing. In fact, I find it ironic that people here are essentially "forced" to embrace English instead of conversing in the vernacular (it is seen as a sign of breeding, education, and class).

That being said, a few notable exceptions are there: Alex Compton, who played in the now-defunct MBA and now works as a color commentator for Solar TV, actually speaks Tagalog fluently. Norman Black entered the PBA as an import and has more or less mastered the language; I think his high-school son Aaron speaks it as well. Greg Slaughter speaks Bisaya (sort of the Catalan to Tagalog's Castilian) on occasion. Ray Parks grew up here before flying to Memphis and sends messages in Tagalog on Facebook.

Speaking Tagalog is mainly a product of growing around Filipinos. In areas such California, New York, and Chicago, there is a significant Filipino population, while in other areas, such as the Deep South and Midwest, you'd be hard-pressed to find a Filipino or someone who can trace his roots here.

BTW, cardenales, Spanish is still spoken here, although its usage is rapidly dying out. Spanish used to be included in the high school curriculum, but is now confined to colleges and families who trace their roots to Spain. There are a few creole languages that are more or less 50 - 70% Spanish, such as the Zamboanga Chavacano.

cardenales
06-30-2010, 10:22 AM
Thank you very much Kerouca for the information.

interxavierxxx
06-30-2010, 11:27 AM
It was Japan, actually. The British occupied the Philippines in 1762-1764, while Japan subjugated what was then the Commonwealth of the Philippines during World War II. For a period after the war, Filipinos of Japanese descent were not exactly well-received. In contrast, British presence in the 19th century consisted mainly of a few trading houses in the principal ports and didn't have the impact that the Japanese occupation had on our history.

As for your question, sinobball, I'd like to think that most of them would've picked up at least a few basic words or phrases during their stay here. This is because English is the second language here anyway and people are more likely to understand them here than, say, in Beijing. In fact, I find it ironic that people here are essentially "forced" to embrace English instead of conversing in the vernacular (it is seen as a sign of breeding, education, and class).

That being said, a few notable exceptions are there: Alex Compton, who played in the now-defunct MBA and now works as a color commentator for Solar TV, actually speaks Tagalog fluently. Norman Black entered the PBA as an import and has more or less mastered the language; I think his high-school son Aaron speaks it as well. Greg Slaughter speaks Bisaya (sort of the Catalan to Tagalog's Castilian) on occasion. Ray Parks grew up here before flying to Memphis and sends messages in Tagalog on Facebook.

Speaking Tagalog is mainly a product of growing around Filipinos. In areas such California, New York, and Chicago, there is a significant Filipino population, while in other areas, such as the Deep South and Midwest, you'd be hard-pressed to find a Filipino or someone who can trace his roots here.

BTW, cardenales, Spanish is still spoken here, although its usage is rapidly dying out. Spanish used to be included in the high school curriculum, but is now confined to colleges and families who trace their roots to Spain. There are a few creole languages that are more or less 50 - 70% Spanish, such as the Zamboanga Chavacano.

We may be able to revive the uses of the Spanish language if we become major trading partners of Latin American countries and Spain.

CKR13
06-30-2010, 01:45 PM
I for one have never felt any animosity towards Filipinos born and raised abroad; despite they do not speak any Filipino at all or their features are "westernized" I would welcome them.

I would like to share a quote from TIME Magazine on their feature about Asians born and raised on the West and when they do revisit their "Roots" they feel somehow alienated but it was still a journey of self discovery.

"Physical alliterations could alienate one from home, but where one's roots are buried are safe from changes."

The Asian Journey Home (http://www.time.com/time/asia/2003/journey/story.html)

paolylo
06-30-2010, 04:08 PM
how Asian are we talking about? i can easily pick 3 answers in the poll but since the thread only allows one, there's no point in answering.

i'd personally accept a multiracial/foreign-born Filipino if he or she has lived in the country long enough to experience what everyday Filipinos experience, has achieved a decent level of our language's fluency (not just asking "where's the restroom" in the vernacular), and has an ounce of Philippine blood. i don't know how it is for every other person in every other Asian country, but given the multiracial aspect of some Asian countries... either of the two former conditions i mentioned will do and even apply to foreigners in here. that's why i consider foreigners who live here and speak Filipino to be more Filipino than some foreign-born Filipino who denies his or her Asian heritage and thinks he or she's a Pacific Islander.

our Presidents' parents must be citizens at the time of their birth. but that's a rule because we've had racial issues for ages. i don't think more traditional Asian countries have had that concern. perhaps some Asian countries were more open to race-mixing than most. just by facial features, can anyone really tell the difference between an early 20th century Sino-Japanese from a Chinese? or even a Cantonese from a mainlander?

Billy Bounce
06-30-2010, 05:45 PM
This question has been raised many times in many forms in Asian basketball, I figure I'll make a poll in the OT section. "Asian" here includes Middle Easterners if the term is confusing.

I made the poll with basketball NTs in mind but of course the question isn't limited to that. In particular, ask you this, if all things are equal, would you feel comfortable having this person serve as your national president?

Well, I guess I could pass for Middle Easterner :p

The right answer is "it depends" :cool:

For certain jobs it's even better to have somebody "outsider", e.g. without connections to elites within the country

We have probably the best head of a Central Bank ever , and he was born in Zambia, finished his school in Zimbabwe , then studied/worked in London , Boston ...

hoopaddict
06-30-2010, 06:37 PM
In my opinion i don't see any problems considering foreign-born Filipinos. In the first place it ain't their fault not being born here, second you can't choose your parents and third it is already a part of our culture to find work,study or migrate to another country. From what i know approximately 10M Filipinos are abroad (not including the unaccounted ones). That's almost the whole population of metro manila, or twice the population of Lebanon..imagine that!
So the chances of them bearing children in a foreign land to a fellow Filipino or not is highly expected. Actually my nephew was born in kuwait and my cousins were born in the U.S.
I'm a sailor and ive been all over the world (except africa).In every country I've been to ,there is always a Filipino (pure blood,half or whatever) .I can still see that there is still a part of them distinctive of being a Filipino even thought they havent been here.

I'm not sure with the other asian countries, but we don't really discriminate foreigners, actually we welcome them.. It is us that are rudely discriminated whenever we go to the U.S. or Europe.This is coming from my experience. Ive been and out the U.S from quite some time now, but each and every time i end up in the second immigration office even though all my papers are ok.. and believe me, if that office is far from the main immigration counters ,you'll feel like you are walking in the hall of shame..all eyes are on you as if you are a criminal... and the reason they gave me from being held up in there is that i look like a korean (north korean!)not a filipino, i guess they always mistook me for a spy... :p

sinobball
06-30-2010, 10:21 PM
The question was confusing to start with because by "one of us" it makes no distinction between, for example an "ethnic Chinese" and a "Chinese national". I just wanted a general response on acceptance and I liked all of your responses.

The reason I started this thread is because there have been plenty of arguments on the issue on this board, I particularly remember a few years back when some Chinese posters fought with Filipino/Lebanese posters that resulted in multiple threads getting locked. One of the biggest issues, as some of you remembered, was on the issue of naturalization in "national teams".

Asia for the most part is not like America the melting pot of immigrants. However, there is still great diversity. Some countries are quite homogeneous in ethnic composition like China, and as such, most lack understanding of the American value called national diversity. On the other hand some countries have been former colonies like RP and Lebanon and the culture of acceptance is predictably different from China.

TrueBluePinoy
07-01-2010, 12:32 AM
The ultra-nationalist's criteria of a true Filipino::D

- He must not relate himself with his roots if the only thing he knows is Filipino food. (ex: adobo)

- He must use tagalog or any Philippine dialect as a first language if he is residing anywhere in the Philippines

- Balut is not an aphrodisiac

- Tuyo (dried fish) should be viewed as a luxury. Not something you should be covering your nose from.

- He should not fear eating fish that is not filleted.

hoopaddict
07-01-2010, 04:47 AM
The question was confusing to start with because by "one of us" it makes no distinction between, for example an "ethnic Chinese" and a "Chinese national". I just wanted a general response on acceptance and I liked all of your responses.

The reason I started this thread is because there have been plenty of arguments on the issue on this board, I particularly remember a few years back when some Chinese posters fought with Filipino/Lebanese posters that resulted in multiple threads getting locked. One of the biggest issues, as some of you remembered, was on the issue of naturalization in "national teams".

Asia for the most part is not like America the melting pot of immigrants. However, there is still great diversity. Some countries are quite homogeneous in ethnic composition like China, and as such, most lack understanding of the American value called national diversity. On the other hand some countries have been former colonies like RP and Lebanon and the culture of acceptance is predictably different from China.

Correct me if im wrong. From what i know inter racial mixing is not that accepted in the chinese culture. That is why arranged marriage is quite common for the Fil-Chinese community.:confused:

dxjayrock2008
07-04-2010, 10:40 AM
Well, they're afraid that one day, a non-chinese will overtake their company. Lol.